Skip to Main Content U.S. Department of Energy
Fundamental Science Directorate
Page 347 of 375

Biological Sciences Division
Research Highlights

July 2005

DOE review of proteomic informatics capability given high marks

Contact:

PNNL's proteomics and bioinformatics capabilities were reviewed by DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) March 29. The purpose of the review was to understand PNNL's informatics capabilities and evaluate the Proteomics Research Information Storage and Management (PRISM) system and related tools for their ability to address the informatics challenges of the proteomics research program as outlined in the proposal for continuation of BER support. The reviewers were BER program manager Marvin Stodolsky; Theodoros Topaloglou, Protana, Inc.; Nathan Goodman, Institute for Systems Biology; and Terry Gaasterland, University of California-San Diego.

The review was extremely well received, and the reviewers' overall assessment is that "the current informatics platform meets the needs of the high-throughput proteomics production operations. The platform has grown in an environment of evolving requirements driven by the proteomics technology development efforts...however, it has been established in practice that the platform is scalable and extensible. The team follows the data standards initiatives in the area of proteomics data and has presented a plan for incorporating parts of these standards in their future work."

This was Stodolsky's first visit to the lab, and he noted that it was a useful trip, because "The scope of the proteomics facility and the depth/enthusiasm of the support team could not otherwise be appreciated. BER thus considers the review started in the Fall 2004 concluded, entirely successfully."

Staff involved in the review included Dick Smith, Gordon Anderson, Ken Auberry, Deep Jaitly, Matt Monroe, Mary Lipton, and Dave Koppenaal.


Page 347 of 375

Fundamental & Computational Sciences

User Facilities

Research Areas

Divisions

Additional Information

Research Highlights Home

Share

Print this page (?)

YouTube Facebook Flickr TwitThis LinkedIn

Contacts