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Award Archive

 

2012 Awards

Deng Selected to Participate in NAE's 2012 U.S. Frontiers of Engineering Symposium  (Posted 6/21/2012)

PNNL wins two R&D 100 Awards  (Posted 6/20/2012)

PNNL scientist receives Early Career Research Award  (Posted 5/14/2012)

PNNL technology wins FLC award for improving submarine air quality  (Posted 5/3/2012)

Chris Baumann Receives DOE Classification Award of Excellence

Karl Castleton Receives Domestic Nuclear Detection Office Commendation  (Posted 4/24/2012)

PNNL Receives FLC Interagency Partnership Award  (Posted 4/24/2012)

Keqi Tang and Ryan Kelly Win Technology Transfer Award  (Posted 2/1/2012)

Mike Kluse named Laboratory Director of the Year  (Posted 2/1/2012)

PNNL Team Wins ACS Award for Team Innovation

An inter-disciplinary PNNL team received the ACS Award for Team Innovation for successfully applying PNNL's SAMMS technology to create a new and effective solution to the critical challenge of removing CO2 from breathing air aboard U.S. submarines.  (Posted 8/21/2012)

Dan DuBois Wins ACS Award In Inorganic Chemistry  (Posted 8/21/2012)

PNNL/EMSL Team Earns Microscopy Today 2012 Innovation Award  (Posted 8/2/2012)

TMS Presents Nyberg with Distinguished Service Award  (Posted 4/24/2012)

Ram Devanathan Wins Fulrath Award of the American Ceramic Society  (Posted 4/9/2012)

Modeling Paper Wins Society of Toxicology Award  (Posted 3/12/2012)

Vamsi Kodali and Gaurav Sharma Named Outstanding Postdocs for Nanotox Research  (Posted 3/12/2012)

PNNL Team Recognized for Second-Most Downloaded ASME Paper  (Posted 3/7/2012)

PNNL Team wins ASME Best Paper Award  (Posted 1/24/2012)

Heejin Cho Receives Applied Energy Editor's 2011 Best Reviewers Award  (Posted 7/17/2012)

PNNL Researchers Awarded Best Paper at International Conference  (Posted 6/21/2012)

Guopeng Liu Receives Building and Environment Best Paper Award  (Posted 4/24/2012)

Article by Jian Tian, Praveen Thallapally and Pete McGrail Honored by CrystEngComm

Jian, Praveen and Pete were recognized by CrystEngComm for their recent contribution to its online journal. Their article on porous organic molecular materials was among the top 10 accessed articles from the site for the month of January.

CrystEngComm publishes communications, full papers, highlights, and letters about cutting-edge crystal engineering research.  (Posted 4/24/2012)

PNNL Team Garners ISEC Best Poster Award  (Posted 3/7/2012)

Paula Linnen wins ATHENA Leadership Award

Presented by the Tri-City Regional Chamber of Commerce, the award recognizes professional excellence, community service and for actively assisting women in professional excellence and leadership skills.  (Posted 1/30/2012)

PNNL Team wins R&D 100 Award for Dynaforge technology  (Posted 1/24/2012)

 

2012 Fellowships

Bob Wegeng Named Associate Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics  (Posted 9/6/2012 12:07:00 PM)

Chuck Peden Named Fellow of the American Chemical Society  (Posted 7/23/2012)

Morris Bullock Named Fellow of the American Chemical Society  (Posted 7/23/2012)

Kyle Bunch Named IEEE-USA Engineering & Diplomacy Fellow

IEEE-USA Engineering & Diplomacy Fellows are recognized by a year working in Washington DC, providing technical expertise to the U.S. State Department, and contributing the foreign policy process.  (Posted 5/21/2012)

Srinivas Katipamula Earns ASME Fellow Distinction  (Posted 3/8/2012)

Jun Liu Elected Materials Research Society Fellow  (Posted 2/16/2012)

Gregg Lumetta named 2011 American Chemical Society Fellow  (Posted 1/24/2012)

Sotiris Xantheas Named Visiting Fellow at German Research Institute  (Posted 6/20/2012)

 

2012 Elected Positions and Offices

Meredydd Evans Joins Steering Committee for IEA Policy Pathways on Building Energy Codes  (Posted 5/17/2012)

Janelle Downs Invited to Serve on Northwest Scientific Association Board of Directors  (Posted 7/17/2012)

 

2012 Impact on Scientific Community

Hibbard and Skaggs Contribute to the National Climate Assessment  (Posted 7/5/2012)

PNNL Receives Secretary's Award of Excellence in Project Management

The DOE Secretary's Award of Excellence in Project Management was presented to the team responsible for managing completion of the Physical Sciences Facility project.  (Posted 4/2/2012)

Dave Anderson and Nancy Kohn Commneded by NRC

NRC lauded the PNNL staff member efforts during the V.C. Summer Nuclear Station mandatory hearing.  (Posted 3/7/2012)

Report on channel project earns praise from the Corps of Engineers  (Posted 1/24/2012)

PNNL Chosen As Premier Proteomics Center for Cancer  (Posted 10/15/2011)

Paper Featured at Intelligent IEEE Transportation Systems Conference  (Posted 3/20/2012)

Wendy Shaw Selected to Attend First U.S-Indonesia Symposium  (Posted 1/1/2012)

Johannes Lercher Selected for Prestigious Lectureship in China  (Posted 7/11/2012)

Johannes Lercher Invited to Be First Vladimir Haensel Invitational Lecturer in Catalysis  (Posted 7/11/2012)

PNNL Team Credited with Third Most Downloaded Article

The publication, Nuclear Instruments And Methods In Physics Research Section A (NIM-A), has credited a team of researchers within NSD for having the third most downloaded NIM-A article in 2011. Congratulations to Dick Kouzes, James Ely, Azaree Lintereur, Mitchell Woodring, Daniel Stephens, and Emily Mace on this notable achievement.

The research paper focuses on the shortage of Helium-3 used in neutron detection applications — namely radiation portal monitor systems — and how this shortage has triggered the search for effective alternative neutron detection technologies for national security and safeguards applications. It was the culmination of a team effort in this area of research of significance to national security.  (Posted 6/1/2012)

Catalysis Team Edits, Contributes to Special Issue on Diesel Emission Control  (Posted 5/1/2012)

PNNL Researchers Invited to Join International Exascale I/O Interface Working Group  (Posted 3/12/2012)

Birgit Schwenzer Selected as MRS Volume Organizer  (Posted 3/12/2012)

Greg Patton Recognized by INTERPOL for international contribution  (Posted 3/8/2012)

Janetos Featured Speaker at Glen Gerberg Weather and Climate Summit  (Posted 1/1/2012)

 

2011 Awards

PNNL Receives DOE Sustainability Award

A PNNL team led by Mike Moran and Jennifer Su-Coker, were recognized by DOE for outstanding contributions to sustainability, including accomplishments in managing pollution, waste, energy, water and vehicle fleets.  (Posted 11/7/2011)

PNNL teams win DOE Secretary's Honor Award  (Posted 10/27/2011)

Wei-Jun Qian Receives PECASE Award

Wei-Jun Qian, Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate, was named winner of a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) for his work in proteomics. The PECASE is the highest honor given by the U.S. government to scientists and engineers who are at the start of their careers. Wei-Jun and his fellow PECASE winners will be honored at a White House ceremony Oct. 14.

Wei-Jun, who came to PNNL in 2002, is developing more accurate methods using mass spectrometry to measure protein concentrations, which fluctuate as cells go about their daily tasks. He's also exploring novel ways to detect how and when certain proteins undergo modifications, such as when some protein functions are turned on or off. This information can help make the biological production of biofuels and other bioproducts more efficient. It also can help improve the way diseases are diagnosed and expand understanding of how diseases progress.  (Posted 9/1/2011)

Reid Peterson, Jim Buelt and Yasuo Onishi Recognized by Office of Nuclear Energy for Fukushima contributions

Reid, Jim and Yasuo have been recognized by DOE-NE Assistant Secretary Peter Lyons for their efforts in support of DOE's response and assistance to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant incident in Japan.

In letters presented to the three staff members, Lyons praised their work on several tasks, including assistance to improve the flow and integration of data from the plant, support to DOE's Emergency Operations Center, and helping to ensure efficient coordination of national laboratory capabilities. Lyons noted DOE's response to the incident is an example of how DOE and staff can quickly come together to help address an international challenge.

The National Security Directorate's Burt Johnson and Bruce Reid also were recognized by Lyons.  (Posted 9/1/2011)

Matthew Marshall and Alex Tartakovsky Win Early Career Awards

Two scientists from PNNL will receive Early Career Research Awards from DOE to advance the fields of underground contaminant cleanup and computer modeling. Each researcher will receive grants totaling $2.5 million over five years.

The two PNNL awardees are:
Matthew Marshall, Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, who will use the grant to study microbial biofilms, which are large communities of bacteria growing on other surfaces. Learning more about the chemical composition of microbial biofilms could also improve understanding of how contaminants are transported underground.

Alex Tartakovsky

Alexandre Tartakovsky, Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, who will use the grant to develop new, simplified models to simulate complex molecular processes on powerful supercomputers. The goal is to improve computer modeling, which is widely used in scientific research, so that larger problems can be simulated faster and more accurately.

They are among 65 researchers who were selected this year from a pool of about 1,150 applicants. The Early Career Research Program is designed to bolster the nation's scientific workforce by providing support to exceptional researchers during the crucial early years, when many scientists do their most formative work. The program is funded by DOE's Office of Science.  (Posted 5/1/2011)

Glenn Hammond receives DOE INCITE Award

Glenn Hammond was named recipient of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) INCITE (Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment) Award—an award of computer simulation processing time for innovative projects that would be impossible or impractical to observe in the natural world.

Glenn, partnering with researchers from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is conducting the project, "Ultrascale Simulation of Basin-Scale CO2 Sequestration in Deep Geologic Formations and Radionuclide Migration using PFLOTRAN." His team was awarded 15 million processor hours on ORNL's Cray XT supercomputer, Jaguar.  (Posted 4/1/2011)

PNNL Gulf Oil Leak Team Efforts Recognized

PNNL received recognition for its support in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon explosion and fire in the Gulf of Mexico.

Members of the PNNL team that calculated oil flow rates from the damaged Macondo Well were recognized with a letter from the DOE Assistant Secretary of Fossil Energy James Markowsky. He wrote, "The level of detail and analysis that your final report embodies is truly impressive and a tribute to the power of the DOE's national labs to come together with a broad disciplinary team to address a national challenge."

The PNNL team members were Phil Gauglitz, Lenna Mahoney, Jim Fort, Judith A. Bamberger, Jeremy Blanchard, Jagan Bontha, Chrissy Charron, Carl Enderlin, Bill Kuhn, Perry Meyer, Yasuo Onishi, Dave Pfund, Dave Rector, Dana Ruane, Mark Stewart, Don Trent , Beric Wells, and Thomas Yokuda, all with the Energy and Environment Directorate, and Bill Dey, Operational Systems Directorate.

Phil also was presented the U.S. Geological Survey Director's Award for his efforts leading the PNNL Gulf Oil Leak Team. USGS Director Marcia McNutt wrote, "The Nation was privileged to have a cadre of such dedicated and capable Government, academic, and independent scientists to call upon during this disaster."  (Posted 2/1/2011)

PNNL Research on CO2 Capture and Storage Featured at Cancun International Climate Negotiations

The research of PNNL scientists Bob Dahowski, Casie Davidson, and Jim Dooley was featured at the U.S. State Department's highly interactive exhibit at the COP16 Climate Change Negotiations held in Cancun, Mexico, Nov. 29-Dec. 10, 2010. The State Department's presentation was designed to spotlight ongoing U.S. climate science and climate mitigation research.

PNNL teamed with scientists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Rock and Soil Mechanics in a five-year study of the potential for deploying CO2 transport and storage technologies in China's fast-growing industrial economy. The breakthrough work has greatly improved the scientific community's understanding of the potential for large-scale deployment of CO2 storage in China to combat climate change.

PNNL provided research highlights and graphics to StormCenter Communications Inc., who developed and delivered the exhibits and presentations on behalf of the U.S. State Department. According to StormCenter president Dave Jones, the presentations exceeded the State Department's expectations.

In an email sent to PNNL staff Dave noted that, "Many people said that the U.S. had the best science presentations and that no one else from any other nation that had exhibits came close to having engaging content and science with regard to climate change." He added that "The head of the U.S. State Department Press Office... said that our demonstrations were being discussed in the actual negotiations."  (Posted 1/1/2011)

Mart Oostrom Named EMSL Wiley Research Fellow

Mart Oostrom has been appointed as a Wiley Research Fellow at EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. The appointment specifically recognizes Mart's past, present and future planned efforts to work with EMSL users and further develop the Subsurface Flow and Transport Laboratory (SFTL).

In addition to leading projects in the SFTL, a DOE user facility catering to scientists interested in flow and transport experiments, Mart is a co-author of the numerical research simulator STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases).  (Posted 1/1/2011)

Andy Felmy Named as EMSL Wiley Research Fellow

Congratulations to Dr. Andy Felmy, PNNL Laboratory Fellow, on being selected as a William R. Wiley Fellow at the Department of Energy's Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). Felmy was selected based on recognition of his strong contributions to this user facility. The Wiley Research Fellows program recognizes scientists who make significant contributions to EMSL outside of their individual research efforts.

Felmy is a nationally recognized expert on the thermodynamics of aqueous electrolytes and actinide species. He was EMSL's Chief Science Officer from 2005-2009 and remains heavily engaged in planning its future investments and science themes. Felmy leads the EMSL Radiochemistry Advisory Committee for a new radiochemistry capability that will provide counsel on how it could advance EMSL's science themes; enhance scientific impact through capability development, integrate with other user facilities, and operate safely.

Scientists named as Fellows actively participate in developing plans and strategies to guide EMSL's instrument and capability investments, science themes, and user activities. Fellows also are consultants for EMSL users and advocates for the user program. The Fellows program is named after William R. Wiley, the former director of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who first conceived the idea of a DOE Office of Science molecular sciences user facility and whose advocacy led to its creation. More information is available online.  (Posted 1/1/2010)

Jean Futrell Earns ASMS Honor, Makes 'History'  (Posted 12/21/2011)

Julia Laskin receives ACS Rising Star Award  (Posted 12/1/2011)

Mikey Brady Raap Recognized for Fukushima Support

Mikey Brady Raap, an engineer in the Nuclear Systems Design, Engineering and Analysis group, has been recognized by the American Nuclear Society (ANS) with a Special Recognition Award for her contribution to the ANS Fukushima, Japan Rapid Response Effort.

The citation was for, "her contributions supporting the response to events in Fukushima, Japan, in order to ensure credible nuclear science and technology information was provided to the media, decision makers and general public. It is the dedication of members such as Michaele who enable the Society to be relevant and a strong advocate for the nuclear community as a whole."

As the ANS Chair for the Professional Divisions Committee, Mikey coordinated efforts to harness the technical expertise of the ANS professional divisions to help address the Fukushima situation. This broad range of expertise made it possible to collect and share credible information for understanding the incident and concerns related to radiation exposure and impacts.

"I also was able to engage the Health Physics Society on some of these responses due to my working relationship with PNNL staff member, Kathy Pryor who is now president of the Health Physics Society" Mikey added.

Mikey also was involved with the development of the ANS technical brief, "The Impact of Mixed Oxide Fuel Use on Accident Consequences at Fukushima Daiichi."  (Posted 8/1/2011)

PNNL staff members contribute to ACS Section winning Six 2011 ChemLuminary Awards

The 13th Annual ChemLuminary Awards celebration was held in conjunction with the ACS National Meeting in Denver, CO, on August 30, 2011. The Richland Section was a finalist for 8 (out of 40 categories) and won 6 of the awards for work done in 2010. Anna Cavinato and Janet Bryant prepared a poster describing the Richland Section activities that was posted during the ACS event. Anna Cavinato (EOU), Janet Bryant and Sam Bryan (PNNL), and Richland Section Councilor Richard Hermens (EOU-Emeritus) attended the awards ceremony on behalf of the Section.

The 6 awards received:

  • Outstanding Continuing Public Relations Program of a Local Section, presented by the Committee on Public Relations & Communications (CPRC). The award is presented for the "Girls in Science" program, a hands-on investigation inviting more than 100 girls to use critical-thinking and interdisciplinary techniques to solve the question, "Is this an alien attack?"
  • ACS Student Chapter Interaction Award, presented by the Society Committee on Education (SOCED). Nutrition was the focus when ACS student chapter members joined the Richland section in offering a month-long program for talented and gifted students and Saturday Science to children from the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla.
  • Outstanding Kids and Chemistry Award, presented by the Society Committee on Education (SOCED). Members of the Richland Local Section provided a number of high quality programs exposing students to the wonder of chemistry. These included Girls in Science, Saturday Science and nutrition workshops for local students.
  • Award for Diversity, presented by the Diversity & Inclusion Advisory Board (D&I). The Richland section held "Saturday Science" at Blue Mountain Community College with 35 middle school students that included many Native Americans. Students conducted hands-on activities revolving around nutrition and closed the event with a magic show.
  • Outstanding Event for a Specific Audience, presented by the Committee on Community Activities (CCA). "Girls in Science" in its 9th year continues to draw a large crowd and is the crown of NCW and Diversity and Inclusion activities for the Section. With help from over 60 volunteers, the event served 100+ girls in grades 6-8.
  • Most Innovative New Activity or Program in a Local Section, presented by the Committee on Local Section Activities (LSAC). Richland Section student members and Eastern Oregon University faculty hosted a weekly group of talented and gifted students over one month exploring chemistry and nutrition; relating to fats, proteins and carbohydrates; and learning about nutritional labels. The program concluded with a poster of a macromolecule that presented their findings to classmates.

PNNL Staff Members involved include: Asanga Padmaperuma (2010 Chair of the Section); Novella Bridges; Sam Bryan; Janet Bryant; Kayte Denslow ; Sandy Fiskum; Dave Heldebrant; Tim Hubler; Phillip Koech; Gregg Lumetta; Jonathan Male; Bill Samuels.

For additional information and to hear and view the excitement, visit the ACS website - 13th Annual ChemLuminary Awards.  (Posted 8/1/2011)

Evelyn Hirt Recognized by IEEE with William W. Middleton Distinguished Award

Evelyn Hirt, a principal engineer in the Quality Assurance Services group, will be honored in August at the opening ceremonies of the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) Sections Congress, IEEE's triennial gathering of worldwide Section leaders, with the William W. Middleton Distinguished Service Award.

Evelyn is being recognized for "a career of exemplary service and inspirational leadership that enthusiastically promotes IEEE as a desirable professional home, and for mentoring volunteers around the world in support of ... member engagement and enhanced organizational unit cooperation." The Middleton Award is presented by the IEEE Member and Geographic Activities (MGA) Board every three years to honor someone "who, over a long and sustained period of leadership, contributed in an exemplary manner" to advancing the Board's goals and objectives.

This is Evelyn's second major award in 2011. In April the University of Detroit Mercy's College of Engineering & Science honored her as its Engineering Alumna of the Year.

Evelyn was the IEEE-USA President in 2010, is the 2011-2012 Kiwanis Club of Tri-Cities Industry Vice President, and has served on the IEEE, American Association of Engineering Societies and Eta Kappa Nu Honors Society Boards of Directors.  (Posted 7/1/2011)

Johannes Lercher Named 2011 Robert Burwell Lecturer for Catalysis Society

Dr. Johannes Lercher, Director of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Institute for Integrated Catalysis, received the Robert Burwell Lectureship in Catalysis from the North American Catalysis Society. This honor, sponsored by Johnson Matthey, recognizes outstanding contributions in catalysis research. As the Burwell Lecturer, Lercher will present talks and hold discussions at the local catalysis clubs and societies for the next 2 years.

Lercher was selected for this honor for his groundbreaking contributions to catalysis, his intellectual curiosity, and his engaging talks. His research is focused on the fundamentals of catalytic materials and processes that are important to industrial applications. His work includes research on catalyzed reactions involving fossil fuels and alternative feedstocks such as biomass, and has resulted in nearly 400 publications and 10 patents.

Lercher is a Professor in the Department of Chemistry at the Technische Universität München in Munich, Germany, and a Battelle Fellow at PNNL. He splits his time about equally between TUM and the IIC at PNNL.  (Posted 6/1/2011)

Nate Engle Awarded AAAS Congressional Fellowship

Congratulations to Nate Engle, Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, who was awarded one of two prestigious 2012 Congressional Fellowships from the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Nate is a postdoc at the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a partnership between PNNL and the University of Maryland. Fellows awarded one of the highly competitive Science & Technology Policy Fellowships spend a year on Capitol Hill assisting with research, developing and drafting legislation, and providing input for policy review and oversight. Nate begins his fellowship in Washington, D.C., in September.

At JGCRI, Nate supports projects on climate policy decision making, adaptation decisions, and intersections between the research community and policy makers. His experience prior to JGCRI was on projects for the World Bank, the Pew Center for Global Climate Change, and as a visiting scholar at the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research in the United Kingdom.

Richard Moss, also of FCSD, is a mentor for Nate at the JGCRI. Richard commented on Nate's appointment, "Nate quickly established himself as a major contributor to our group's work on impacts, adaptation, vulnerability and resilience. It's a signal and well deserved honor for Nate to be awarded this fellowship. It has been a real pleasure to have him as part of our group this year. We wish him well in this next step of his career."

The highly competitive AAAS Science & Technology Policy Fellowships give scientists and engineers the opportunity to contribute to the federal policy-making process while learning about the intersection between science, technology, and national policy. The AAAS program has grown into a partnership with nearly 15 federal agencies, congressional offices and committees, and 30 professional scientific societies. Over 100 fellowships are awarded each year.  (Posted 6/1/2011)

Novella Bridges recognized as a Distinguished Woman in Chemistry

Novella Bridges, a chemist who has helped develop processes to reduce diesel emissions in vehicles and create therapeutic agents for cancer treatments, has been named one of 14 Distinguished Women in Chemistry/Chemical Engineering by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry, or IUPAC.

The awards were made by IUPAC to mark the 100th anniversary of the Nobel Prize in chemistry awarded to Marie Sklodowska Curie. Bridges, who has worked at PNNL since 2000, and the other international recipients will be honored at a ceremony during the IUPAC World Congress in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Aug. 2.  (Posted 5/1/2011)

Sarah Widder named among "New Faces in Engineering" by the National Engineers Week Foundation

Sarah Widder, Energy and Environment Directorate, has been named a "New Face" in engineering by the National Engineers Week Foundation. A coalition of engineering societies, major corporations and government agencies, the Foundation members nominate colleagues 30 years old and younger who have shown outstanding abilities and leadership.

A research paper Sarah published in 2009 after earning a bachelor's in chemical engineering from the University of Washington, "Policy Options for Nuclear Waste Management a Sustainable Solution for Expanded Nuclear Energy," has served as vital background for AIChE Nuclear Engineering Division, and helps set the stage for impacting important U.S. policy decisions on energy. She currently is pursuing a doctorate in environmental/civil engineering at Washington State University.

New Faces of Engineering is promoted during National Engineers Week to provide incentive to those in college and inspire younger students to consider engineering careers.  (Posted 3/1/2011)

Guopeng Liu and Project Win AEE Awards

Guopeng Liu, Energy and Environment Directorate, recently was named the Association of Energy Engineers (AEE) Young Energy Professional of the Year in Region I, which covers the northeastern United States. AEE is a professional association of over 13,000 members engaged in the energy industry.

The award recognizes Guopeng's outstanding contributions to the energy profession that he made prior to his current position at PNNL. He joined the Laboratory just last May.

In addition to receiving the Young Energy Professional award, Guopeng was pleased that an energy efficiency project he previously managed won AEE's Region IV Energy Project of the Year. Efficiencies at Kiewit Plaza-a 16-story Omaha, NE, office building with tenants that include Warren Buffett-produced a 62 percent reduction in electricity use in its heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system, and a 37 percent reduction of whole building electricity usage. Additionally, there was a 48 percent drop in natural gas consumption. In all, it translated to savings of nearly $140,000 over a nine-month period with simple payback in eight months.

"Innovative building control technology and commercial building re-tuning can help to achieve the goal of President Obama's Better Buildings Initiative by improving building operation and maintenance. Even for a well-maintained facility with effective systems, such as Kiewit Plaza, we can still apply efficiencies that achieve significant energy savings and maintain comfort without large capital outlays," Guopeng explains. "Two DOE-sponsored projects I'm involved in are consistent with those efforts: one is training the next generation of commercial building technology workers, and the other is developing the retrofit guides for commercial building owners and facility managers."

The AEE awards were presented in December at the 33rd World Energy Engineering Conference in Washington, D.C  (Posted 3/1/2011)

Guo-Shuh (John) Lee awarded 2010 Giuseppe Parravano Award for Excellence in Catalysis R&D

Congratulations to EED's John Lee, who was honored in February with the 2010 Michigan Catalysis Society Parravano Award for Excellence in Catalysis Research and Development.

The society recognized John for his outstanding work in all aspects of catalytic process chemistry, with particular emphasis on contributions to mordenite related chemistries. The society also applauded his ability to facilitate interactions between the R&D and business communities toward the development of novel catalytic processes.

John joined PNNL in fall 2009 after a distinguished research career at The Dow Chemical Company. At PNNL, his work currently is focused on developing techniques for upgrading the quality of oil produced from biomass.  (Posted 2/2/2011)

Mike Schmoldt and Robbie Tidwell Earn Prestigious Awards from Alliance of Hazardous Materials Professionals

Mike Schmoldt, Operational Systems Directorate, and Robbie Tidwell, Energy and Environment Directorate, have been honored with national Champion of Excellence awards from the Alliance of Hazardous Materials Professionals.

AHMP devotes its efforts to the professional advancement of the hazardous materials management field. The organization includes more than 7,000 members.

Robbie Tidwell

This year, only 59 members received the national Champion of Excellence award, which reflects that the honorees have met multiple service criteria to promote protective management practices for ensuring public and worker safety and awareness. Mike and Robbie say the award is an accomplishment that requires a lot of commitment outside PNNL, and good support from their management.

In addition to the AHMP award, Robbie recently received the Outstanding Service Award from the Eastern Washington Chapter of the Academy of Certified Hazardous Materials Managers. The award was presented at the chapter's Dec. 9 meeting. Mike just completed his term as president of the Eastern Washington Chapter.  (Posted 2/1/2011)

Josef Matyas receives 2009 Best Paper Award from ACerS Division

Josef Matyas, Energy and Environment Directorate, has received the 2009 Best Paper Award from the Nuclear & Environmental Technology Division of the American Ceramic Society (ACerS). The award was presented at the recent 2010 Materials Science and Technology Conference.

Twenty-eight eligible papers appeared in ACerS's 2009 publication, Ceramic Transaction: Advances in Materials for Environmental and Nuclear Energy, and Josef's report, Development of Crystal-Tolerant Waste Glasses, came out on top. EED's John Vienna was also a collaborator on the paper, as well as former interns Alyssa Arrigoni, Micah Schaible, and Rachel Tate.  (Posted 1/1/2011)

Brad Johnson receives 2010 Keramos Greaves-Walker Roll of Honor Award

Brad has been selected as a recipient of the 2010 Greaves-Walker Roll of Honor Award from Keramos, a national professional ceramic engineering organization. The Greaves-Walker Roll of Honor Award recognizes senior members of Keramos. Members are nominated by their peers and elected through a consensus of the Board of Directors.

Keramos has roots that date back to 1902 and, among other things, functions to promote interest in the professional aspects of ceramic engineering, technology and science. Brad has been active in Keramos for many years, most recently serving as the National General Secretary.  (Posted 1/1/2011)

PNNL Senior Research Scientist Receives 2011 Stewardship Award  (Posted 12/13/2011)

Hispanic Engineer & Information Technology (HE&IT) magazine honors Elizabeth Stephens, Maria Luna, and Daniel Chavarria

The three PNNL staff members were recognized with a Top 40 Under 40 Award -- recognizing individuals who are making an impact on shaping technology for the future early in their career.  (Posted 10/26/2011)

PNNL receives 2011 Candidate Experience Award  (Posted 10/17/2011)

Lab Recognized with InformationWeek 500 Honor

A software system that helps PNNL staff understand and comply with the thousands of safety, legal and other requirements and procedures earned the Lab a spot on the InformationWeek 500 list of the most innovative users of business information technology.  (Posted 10/12/2011)

Climate and Aircraft Team Receive NASA Group Achievement Award

Congratulations to Beat Schmid,Gene Dukes, Connor Flynn, John Hubbe, and Celine Kluzek who received the prestigious 2011 National Aeronautics and Space Administration Group Achievement Award. As part of the 4STAR Development Team, which included collaborators at NASA, this team expanded the scientific, engineering and aviation capabilities for sun and sky tracking measurements. The award was given out as part of the 2011 Presidential Rank and NASA Awards Ceremony at the NASA Ames Center in California on August 17.

"This is one of the most prestigious awards a group can receive, and is presented to selected groups who have distinguished themselves by making outstanding contributions to the NASA mission," said S. Pete Worden, Director of the NASA Ames Research Center.

The instrument called 4STAR, or Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research, looks like a bowling ball sitting atop the PNNL G-1 aircraft. With the optical collector trained on the sun and sky light, the rest of the instrument is below in the aircraft cabin, collecting and sending data through fiber optic cable to on board light-measuring instruments. Challenging scientific and instrumentation problems were solved by the team. They designed the instrument to collect important information on atmospheric aerosols and clouds contained in the direct and diffuse solar light within strict calibration requirements, during all sorts of aircraft maneuvers, cabin pressure fluctuations and signal transmission variations. And they did all this while achieving the strict FAA airworthiness certification.

"4STAR worked not only from an engineering point of view, but it proved its airworthiness and married two light-collecting concepts into one compact instrument," said Dr. Beat Schmid, PNNL atmospheric scientist and team lead. "The NASA group achievement award honors our collaboration and scientific effectiveness."  (Posted 8/1/2011)

Jae Edmonds Receives Highest Battelle Honor

Dr. James "Jae" Edmonds has been named a Battelle Fellow, the organization's highest recognition for individual achievement in science and technology. The honor, shared by only five other Pacific Northwest National Laboratory staff, recognizes veteran economist Edmonds for his scientific accomplishments, leadership within PNNL and long record of service to multiple national and international climate science communities. He conducts his research at the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a collaboration between PNNL and the University of Maryland in College Park, Md.

Edmonds, who has been at PNNL for 25 years, is a pioneer in the field of integrated assessment of energy and environment. He was one of the first to link climate science to policy and decision-making. Since its First Assessment in 1990, he has worked with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which shared the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He also leads the development of the Global Climate Assessment Model, known as GCAM, a model of human and natural Earth systems. GCAM is used to assess factors of economy, energy, agricultural land use, and their interactions on decade to century time scales with physical Earth systems such as the carbon cycle, atmospheric chemistry, climate, and sea level.

"Jae's leadership has ensured PNNL's presence at the most esteemed integrated assessment and climate-related conferences and collaborative meetings in the world. He has been called upon extensively by the Executive Office of the President, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the IPCC," said associate laboratory director Doug Ray, who leads PNNL's Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate. "A true collaborator and mentor, Jae is preparing the next generation of PNNL scientists to follow in his footsteps, as shown by their significant roles in the IPCC."

Edmonds is chief scientist for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science's Integrated Assessment Modeling Program. He has received service awards from the Department of State and DOE's Office of Science. He has testified before Congress on how advancements in energy technology can stabilize greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

See PNNL press release, "Noted economist receives highest Battelle honor."  (Posted 8/1/2011)

PNNL Announces Laboratory and Battelle Fellows for 2011

Alain Bonneville, Jason Zhang, Steve Ghan, Julia Laskin, Bill Morgan, Joel Pounds, and Ted Bowyer, were selected as 2011 Laboratory Fellows, a senior scientific and/or engineering position within PNNL; and Johannes Lercher was selected as a Battelle Fellow. These Laboratory Fellows and new Battelle Fellow have established national and international reputations with careers of sustained, highest-quality research and development in their respective fields. They were recommended by the Laboratory Fellows Promotion Advisory Committee and Deputy Director of Science and Technology Steven Ashby, and selected by Laboratory Director Mike Kluse. In addition to the qualities of a PNNL Fellow, the Battelle Fellow has a national and international reputation as an innovator and creator in broad scientific or technical areas. Battelle Fellows have made significant contributions that dramatically affect the conduct of their fields and are recognized authorities with far-reaching impact. Battelle Fellows are appointed by the Laboratory Director based on scientific merit and the recommendation of an associate laboratory director.

These newly selected Fellows will be recognized along with winners of the Laboratory Director's Scientific and Engineering Achievement Awards at a ceremony Sept. 1.

Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate

Steve Ghan is recognized for his research on cloud-aerosol interactions and the vitally important role they play in global climate change. Steve's work on atmospheric chemistry and physics ranging from molecular processes to the microscale and ultimately global scale has provided valuable insights for determining the critical balance between greenhouse gas warming and radiative cooling of the earth. Steve is one of the Lab's most highly cited scientists with 100 refereed publications to his credit, including a team contribution to the critically acclaimed Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Assessment Reports that were cited by the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize.

Julia Laskin is an award-winning scientist whose wide-ranging research interests include physical and analytical chemistry, specifically in mass spectrometry, gas phase ion chemistry, and the physical and chemical interactions of ions with tailored surfaces. Her work utilizing hyperthermal ion modification of surface-implanted molecules and nanodroplet electrospray ionization is paramount for advancing PNNL initiatives in catalysis, materials by design and chemical imaging.

Bill Morgan is an internationally renowned leader in radiation biology. Bill leads the Low Dose Radiation Research Program at PNNL where he concentrates his research on radiation biology with particular emphasis on the long-term biological effects of radiation exposure. Bill is one of the Lab's most highly cited scientists, claiming authorship of 130 high-impact peer-reviewed journals, 53 book chapters, and numerous publications.

Joel Pounds is an internationally recognized scientist in the field of environmental toxicology, particularly the interactions of biological systems and organisms with their environment and the identification of biomarkers for these interactions. His leadership of the serum proteomics project and work with systems toxicology of nanoparticles are recognized as major contributions to current PNNL science themes. Joel is a frequently invited presenter at national and international conferences and is also a dedicated mentor to younger colleagues at the Laboratory.

Energy & Environment Directorate

Alain Bonneville is highly regarded for his expertise in geophysics, specifically on subsurface heat transfer mechanisms, marine heat flow, intraplate volcanism and carbon sequestration science. Alain holds appointments as Professor, Vice Director and Acting President at two distinguished research universities in Paris and French Polynesia, which further attest his international leadership in the field of geophysics. He is currently responsible for the technical leadership of Laboratory-level Initiatives on Carbon Sequestration and Subsurface Science for Geologic Sequestration and Environmental Remediation.

Jason Zhang is regarded for his expertise in experimental and condensed matter physics, particularly in the development of thin-film ionic devices. His emphasis on understanding of fundamental mechanisms underlying Li-ion batteries has rapidly evolved into the Li-air battery concept that is one of the most promising candidates for meeting the high density storage requirements established by the Department of Energy's R&D program for hybrid and all-electric vehicles. Jason's knowledge of applied condensed matter physics is amply demonstrated by his highly cited publications and nineteen patents and patent applications.

National Security Directorate/

Ted Bowyer is an internationally recognized expert in nuclear physics, specifically the detection at extraordinarily remote locations of extremely low level airborne radioactive emissions that are definitive signatures for nuclear explosions. A recent demonstration of his research was the first characterization of nuclear emissions from the Fukushima reactor incident in Japan that was characterized by very low level identification of noble gases at PNNL. Ted serves as a scientific advisor to the National Academy of Sciences, the U.S. Department of Energy, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Swedish Defense Research Institute and the Korean Institute for Nuclear Safety.

New Hire Battelle Fellow

PNNL also welcomes new staff member and Battelle Fellow Johannes Lercher, FCSD. Lercher, an internationally recognized chemist and catalysis expert, is the new director of the Institute for Integrated Catalysis (IIC). He is currently a chemistry professor at Technische Universität München in Munich, Germany, and the editor of a leading chemistry journal, The Journal of Catalysis. Lercher's appointment to the IIC will give PNNL researchers the opportunity to enhance and expand on international research collaborations and further advance the science and technology of catalysis along with the IIC's reputation as a world-leading catalysis research center.  (Posted 7/1/2011)

Allison Campbell, EMSL Director, presented Pioneer of Science Award for scientific, mentoring contributions

When chemist-turned-manager Allison Campbell gathers her staff into the 88-seat auditorium at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, people line the walls to hear her speak. Using humor to make her points, Campbell reflects on staff successes, tells her team how they're making an impact, and inspires them into performing their best.

In addition to being a leader and mentor, Campbell is a successful scientist. By 2006, she developed and licensed a coating that improves the lifetime and success rate of implantable artificial joints. For both qualities, Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute in Buffalo, New York is honoring her with their Pioneer of Science Award. The award goes to individuals with a connection to western New York. Campbell earned her doctorate at State University of New York at Buffalo.

HWI is also honoring her advisor in graduate school, George Nancollas, a chemistry professor and researcher at SUNY, Buffalo. In doing so, HWI is highlighting how clinical research is built on more basic studies. "If you look at any technology out there today, you can always tie it back to some fundamental discovery or advancement of knowledge ten, twenty, twenty-five years prior," said Campbell, director of EMSL at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. "I'm proud that Professor Nancollas and I are being honored in this way, and that the Pioneer of Science award reflects the importance of research that seeks to uncover fundamental principles of life and matter."

EMSL is a Department of Energy facility available to scientists worldwide for collaborative and interdisciplinary research ranging from chemistry and biology to materials sciences and nanotechnology. The lab houses a supercomputer and more than 150 scientific instruments that are used by more than 700 scientists from around the world each year. EMSL scientists and staff push the integration of instruments and software at the facility. As it happens, research that builds on itself reflects Campbell's scientific interests as well as her philosophy. In her early days, Campbell studied how proteins help form minerals in teeth. A basic understanding of the biological mineralization process — from laying down studs to building up structure — helped her develop a coating that helps artificial joints bond to real bone. This coating can also be filled with anti-bacterial agents to prevent infections after surgery.

"For me personally, I like what we call use-inspired research, which is where you work in the fundamental area but you've got your eye on applications," said Campbell. "Ultimately, you're interested in the properties of materials and how you manipulate the atoms and the molecules to get the properties that you want. You're not necessarily coming out with a widget, you're coming out with more knowledge and publications but towards an application. That's the area I like to work in."

This is not Campbell's first award. In 2002, the American Chemical Society honored her as one of 25 Women at the Forefront of Chemistry. In addition, her patented process for bone implant coatings received an Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer from the Federal Laboratory Consortium and an R&D 100 Award, both in 2006, as well as the American Chemical Society's 2005 Regional Industrial Innovation Award. The technology was licensed to a medical device company in 2004.  (Posted 7/1/2011)

Wayne Martin named WSU TC Distinguished Alumni of the Year

Wayne Martin has been named the 2011 Washington State University Tri-Cities Distinguished Alumni of the Year. The honor, which was announced at the commencement ceremony in May, was presented by the WSU-TC Chancellor, Dr. Vicki Carwein.

WSU's Alumnus of the Year award "recognizes those who have gained unique distinction through their accomplishments and have excelled personally and professionally, making a continued and significant difference in the lives of others."

The Distinguished Alumni of the Year is chosen from among one of WSU-TC's College Alumni of the Year. Wayne was selected as the College Alumni of the year for the college of Environmental Science.  (Posted 6/1/2011)

Whitney Colella invited to participate in NAE Frontiers of Engineering Symposium

Whitney Colella is one of 85 people from across the U.S. elected to attend the National Academy of Engineering's 17th annual Frontiers of Engineering symposium, September 19-21 at Google headquarters in Mountain View, Calif.

The symposium brings together the best and brightest of early career engineers between the ages of 30 and 45, and encourages collaboration between different disciplines. This year's meeting will explore the topics of engineering sustainable buildings, additive manufacturing, neuroprosthetics and semantic processing.

Whitney's research is focused on low carbon energy technologies and advanced stationary fuel cell systems.  (Posted 6/1/2011)

Oreste Villa and Antonino Tumeo Win NVIDIA CUDA Research Center

Computational Sciences & Mathematics congratulates Oreste Villa and Antonino Tumeo, Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, for their work that has earned PNNL the prestigious honor of being named a 2011 NVIDIA CUDA Research Center. Additionally, PNNL will receive early access to limited-availability systems, exclusive event invites with key researchers and academics, and a designated NVIDIA technical liaison.

Antonino Tumeo

Villa and Tumeo submitted a paper to NVIDIA that demonstrates how they accelerated scientific computing speeds using graphics processing units (GPUs). Their research was conducted as part of a project on software architectures under PNNL's eXtreme Scale Computing Initiative (XSCI). The use of GPUs is growing and many consider them to be the future of this research direction due to their low cost and high-performance-per-Watt ratio. XSCI has been using GPUs for 3 years as users, purchasing systems as soon as they were available. Now, the group will be able to access all systems immediately.

PNNL is now one of 35 new CUDA Research Centers and CUDA Teaching Centers in 14 countries, further advancing the growth of parallel computing across the world. At PNNL, XSCI is using GPU-acceleration of the subsurface transport simulator STOMP to improve public safety by predicting flow of contaminants into underground waterways, and the computational chemistry simulation code NWChem to address key questions about processes such as photosynthesis, protein function, and combustion. The CUDA Research Center program fosters collaboration at institutions that are expanding the frontier of parallel computing.  (Posted 6/1/2011)

Jeff Estes Awarded 2011 Golden Gavel by the Washington Association of School Administrators

Jeff Estes, manager for PNNL's Office of Science and Engineering Education, Organizational Development Directorate, has been awarded the Washington Association of School Administrators 2011 Golden Gavel Award for his work with STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) education. Jeff leads PNNL efforts to strengthen and advance STEM education in Washington state, which includes fostering outreach programs and partnerships aimed at improving STEM education

The award recognizes those who have made an outstanding contribution to public education in the state of Washington that is applicable statewide and of lasting value. It is the association's highest award. Jeff will be honored during the WASA summer conference in Spokane, June 27, 2011  (Posted 6/1/2011)

Elizabeth Stephens named among Top 200 Most Influential Hispanics in Technology

Elizabeth Stephens was recently selected by Hispanic Engineer & Information Technology (HE&IT) magazine as one of the "2011 Top 200 Most Influential Hispanics in Technology." Elizabeth was selected based upon the excellence of her work, strong commitment to community, and because of her leadership as a role model.

Elizabeth was additionally named by HE&IT as one of the "Top 40 Under 40." The list, which will be published in HE&IT's fall edition, recognizes early-career men and women who are making an impact on shaping technology for the future.  (Posted 3/1/2011)

Deb Gracio Selected WSU 2011 Woman of Distinction

"A Woman of Distinction is known for achievements in her academic work, career, leadership or public service. She has gone above and beyond to contribute to the personal growth and success of others through education, research, or public or volunteer service. Her achievements create positive social change, increase equality for all, and build community through service."

-The President's Commission on the Status of Women at WSU

Congratulations goes to Deb Gracio, who was selected the Washington State University 2011 Alumni Woman of Distinction. Deb, director for the Computational and Statistical Analytics Division, joined PNNL in 1990 shortly after acquiring her Electrical Engineering degrees from WSU. She serves on the executive advisory board for the WSU School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and is a dedicated mentor to engineering students and interns.

Deb has a passion for helping others as demonstrated through her philanthropic service with Habitat for Humanity. As the project manager for a recent Women Build project, "Deb was a role model, promoting team spirit and emphasizing synergy. Deb's direction not only built a home for a family in need, but she also built commitment, empowering women to take on new challenges and to be successful," stated Theresa Richardson, Executive Director for Habitat for Humanity Tri-Cities.  (Posted 3/1/2011)

PNNL Program Support Lands NNSA Coveted Project Management Award

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has received a 2010 Distinguished Project Award from the Project Management Institute (PMI) for its Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) and for launching the G2 project management information system. PMI is the world's largest professional organization for project management, representing over 500 million practitioners in more than 185 countries.

The culmination of a three-year project, the G2 system allows GTRI project managers to pull multiple data sources into real-time portfolios. The innovative and robust system integrates multiple project management tools into a single information technology platform. For the first time, project managers can prioritize, track, and document activities from hundreds of sites-therefore reducing or eliminating major security risks and increasing efficiency. The G2 system also allows project managers to effectively coordinate large increases in resources involving GTRI without having to hire additional staff.

GTRI is responsible for the proper handling and security of high-risk nuclear and radiological materials throughout the world. Its main mission is to deny terrorist access to nuclear and radiological materials as a first line of defense. PNNL supports NNSA in these endeavors by providing expertise, program integration, project implementation, contracting, and technical support to the GTRI.

The G2 project team was lead by Marc Zocher, and included project management and IT experts from PNNL, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and NNSA. Primary PNNL staff members responsible for the development of this system include Keith Freier and Alma Contreras, National Security Directorate, and Matt Samples and Peter Hoag, Operational Systems Directorate.  (Posted 2/1/2011)

Jay Grate Honored as Battelle Distinguished Inventor

Jay Grate, Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, is the latest PNNL staff member to receive the prestigious honor of being named a Battelle Distinguished Inventor.

The title of Battelle Distinguished Inventor is reserved for staff members who have received 14 or more U.S. patents over the course of their career at Battelle or Battelle-managed laboratories. A total of 60 Distinguished Inventors have been recognized to date, 16 of those from PNNL. Jay was honored as that 16th inventor at a celebration held Jan. 27 before staff, Lab leadership and managers who gathered to recognize this highly significant accomplishment.

Jay joined PNNL in 1992. His body of work has encompassed basic research in analytical chemistry and chem/bio sensing leading to the development of prototype detectors with high molecular specificity that are used to quantify biological toxins and pathogens, chemical agents, and radionuclides. He also has pursued research on the application of nanostructured materials in analytical chemistry and catalysis. His patented work includes concepts in functional materials for biocatalysis and chemical sensing as typified by the BSP3 polymer, a unique material that allows sensors to detect trace quantities of nerve agents and other toxic vapors, and for which he received an R&D 100 Award in 2004.

Jay has also been awarded a number of patents for his work in microscale column separations, which are relevant to the development of microfluidic bioanalytical separation systems, and which underpin innovative sensors for pathogen and botulinum toxin detection. Several of his patents have been licensed to commercial partners currently pursuing work in the areas of bioseparations, sensing, polymers, vapor preconcentration, radioanalytical separations and biocatalysis.

"Jay's science leadership roles in numerous projects have provided opportunities to showcase his expertise in the analytical chemistry, sensor, and microfluidics areas leading to innovative invention disclosures and subsequent licensing of intellectual property to the commercial sector," said Greg Exarhos, Jay's manager.  (Posted 2/1/2011)

PNNL Receives Two Gordon Battelle Prizes

Last week, Battelle announced 10 recipients of the inaugural Gordon Battelle Prizes for scientific discovery and technology impact-including two from PNNL.

Selected from entries submitted by laboratories where Battelle plays a significant management role, the awards were divided into two categories:

  • Scientific advances published within the last three years that have significantly advanced human knowledge in any field of the physical, life, or social sciences
  • Technology innovations that are on track, or have high promise, to provide substantial social and/or economic benefit.
Each award-winning team will receive a $5,000 education grant to their school of choice.

In the category of Scientific Discovery, the team led by Dick Smith, Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, and Dr. Steven Schutzer of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ) received a prize for their discovery of thousands of new proteins in spinal fluid. Using integrated instrumentation resources at EMSL, the team applied immunoaffinity separation and high sensitivity resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to examine cerebrospinal fluid from healthy normal individuals and make specific comparisons to other subjects.

This research establishes a reference database that may help researchers and clinicians determine the root causes of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and other neurological conditions, and could contribute to devising faster, more efficient diagnostic tests and treatments for diseases with neurological and psychiatric features. Other PNNL contributors to this research included Tao Liu, Thomas Angel, Athena Schepmoes, Mary Lipton, and David Camp II, Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate, and Samuel Purvine and Kim Hixson, EMSL.

The PNNL/UMDNJ team will donate their $5,000 to support continuing STEM education at Delta High School in Richland.

The Millimeter Wave Technology (MMW) development team, led by Doug McMakin, National Security Directorate, also received a prize in the category of Technology Impact. MMW is a high-resolution radar imaging technology that detects objects made of any type of material-both metallic and non-metallic-which are concealed on the body. Millimeter waves harmlessly penetrate a subject's clothing, reflect off of the body, and send signals back to a transceiver which then cues a computer to reconstruct them into a 3-D holographic image.

Originally commercialized by Battelle start-up Safeview following the events of Sept. 11, 2001, the MMW technology became part of L-3 Communications ProVision(TM) line of security scanners when L-3 acquired Safeview in 2006. The scanners were approved by the Transportation Security Administration for airport deployment in 2009. To date, nearly 500 ProVision systems have been sold and installed, making air travel around the world more safe and secure.

McMakin's team will donate their $5,000 award to the Electrical Engineering Program at Washington State University Tri-Cities.

"One of the great strengths of PNNL is our ability to connect science and technology with national needs, and then move it out our doors for practical applications," said Laboratory Director Mike Kluse. "We're very pleased to have received these prizes, and it is all the more gratifying that they will benefit education here in the Tri-Cities."  (Posted 1/1/2011)

Elizabeth Stephens, Maria Luna, and Daniel Chavarría Named in Top 40 Under 40

Hispanic Engineer & Information Technology (HE&IT) magazine publishes a list of the "Top 40 Under 40"—individuals who are recognized as making an impact on shaping technology for the future early in their careers. This fall, HE&IT's list will add three PNNL staff members to its ranks.

Elizabeth Stephens, Energy and Environment Directorate, is a member of the Energy Materials Group, whose research extends from fundamental science to applied studies, in conjunction with Department of Energy projects that focus on lightweight, high-strength material applications and enabling technologies. She has won numerous awards, including a Federal Laboratory Consortium Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer, a PNNL Scientific Technical Achievement Recognition Award, a HENAAC Most Promising Engineer National Award, and a Washington State Mathematics Engineering Science Achievement Award. In addition to these accomplishments, Elizabeth also was recently selected by HE&IT magazine as one of the "2011 Top 200 Most Influential Hispanics in Technology."

Maria Luna

Maria Luna, Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate, is a member of the Biological Separations & Mass Spectrometry group, where she focuses on proteomics and metabolomics technologies for the biomedical and modern biological research community. Maria is also involved with the Advanced Processing & Applications Group in projects that study, treat, and vitrify radioactive wastes and supports the Environmental Assessment Group research that focuses to eradicate airborne and surface pathogens. Luna has received numerous Outstanding Performance Awards from multidisciplinary projects and has completed the Science and Engineering Development Program. She has co-authored more than 25 peer-reviewed publications.

Daniel Chavarría

Daniel Chavarría, Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate, is a senior research scientist in the High Performance Computing group. Daniel was recognized for his work in parallel and distributed systems, compilers for high-performance and parallel computing, reconfigurable computing, programming languages, and interactions of architectural features with software systems. He has also served as a co-principal investigator for PNNL's Center for Adaptive Supercomputing Architecture, which performs research on the use of multithreaded architectures for non-traditional parallel applications and is the PI on a project funded by the DOE Office of Science Advanced Scientific Computing Research program. Additionally, he has published over 35 papers and collaborated on several others.  (Posted 1/1/2011)

EMSL's Don Baer Receives Riviere Prize

Don Baer, Interim Chief Scientist at EMSL, received the 2011 John Riviere Prize from the UK Surface Analysis Forum (UKSAF).

Don received the award during the UKSAF winter meeting earlier this month, which he attended as an invited speaker. The Riviere Prize is for long-term contributions that have had a major impact.  (Posted 1/1/2011)

 

2011 Fellowships

Five PNNL Scientists Elected AAAS Fellows  (Posted 12/7/2011)

Illuminating Engineering Society Presents Eric Richman with Presidential Award  (Posted 11/2/2011)

Bora Akyol Selected as Fellow on the National Board of Information Security Examiners  (Posted 10/19/2011)

PNNL chemists recognized as ACS celebrates International Year of Chemistry

Two scientists at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been named 2011 American Chemical Society Fellows.

PNNL chemists Janet Bryant and Gregg Lumetta are among 213 distinguished researchers nationwide recognized by the American Chemical Society, also known as ACS, for their "outstanding achievements in and contributions to science and the profession of chemistry."

"ACS is especially proud to honor these chemists during the 2011 International Year of Chemistry," said ACS President Nancy B. Jackson. "The work they are doing will improve all of our lives as they unleash the power of chemistry to solve global challenges like providing clean water, sufficient food, new energy sources and cures for disease."

Janet Bryant

Bryant has had a 30-year multidisciplinary chemistry career at PNNL focused on integrative solutions to international science issues related to nuclear materials, their management and related regulatory and national security policies. For the past decade, she has played key roles in deployment, operational support and configuration management of sensor technologies for the Department of Homeland Security. Bryant earned a master's with emphasis in organizational behavior from the University of Washington, and a bachelor's degree with honor in chemistry from Elmhurst College in Illinois.

Gregg Lumetta

Lumetta has been responsible for planning and executing various applied and fundamental research projects related to radiochemical separations processes. Lumetta serves as a member of Technical Expert Group for DOE's Office of Environmental Management and is focus area lead for the Transuranic Recycle Technology Focus Area of the Sustainable Nuclear Power Initiative at PNNL. He also served as PNNL technical lead for the Department of Homeland Security Threat Awareness and Characterization Thrust Area. Lumetta earned a doctorate degree in inorganic chemistry and a bachelor's degree in chemistry from University of Missouri – St. Louis.

Bryant and Lumetta join three other PNNL scientists honored previously by the ACS: Jean Futrell, Bruce Kay and Yong Wang. They are among the 567 Fellows within the organization of more than 163,000 members. ACS is the world's largest chemical science professional society.

The 2011 Fellows will be recognized at an induction ceremony on Aug. 29 during the society's 242nd National Meeting & Exposition in Denver.

The complete list of ACS Fellows can be found in the Aug. 8 issue of Chemical & Engineering News, and online.  (Posted 8/1/2011)

Eva Hickey elected Health Physics Society Fellow

Eva has been selected as a Health Physics Society Fellow. The Health Physics Society is a 5,000-member scientific organization of professionals who specialize in radiation safety.

Fellows are elected by peers as a result of their significant scientific, educational and/or administrative contributions to the health physics profession. This honor also recognizes Eva's extensive service to HPS, which includes serving on multiple committees and on the Board of Directors, leading the local chapter as president, and most recently serving as an HPS Parliamentarian.  (Posted 5/1/2011)

Chongxuan Liu Elected Fellow of Geological Society of America

Chongxuan Liu was selected as a Geological Society of America Fellow. This professional society, which boasts more than 24,000 members in 97 countries, honors those who have made significant contributions to earth sciences. Liu was chosen for his outstanding contributions in microscopic reactive transport in porous media and applying geosciences in understanding and solving environmental problems, including the movement and fate of radionuclides and contaminants in Hanford's groundwater.

More information available at http://www.pnl.gov/science/highlights/highlight.asp?id=964  (Posted 5/1/2011)

Moe Khaleel Selected as ASCE Fellow

Congratulations to Dr. Moe Khaleel, director of the Computational Sciences and Mathematics Division, and a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Fellow, on his selection as a Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers.

He was recognized for "distinguished contributions to the field of computational engineering sciences, particularly computational multi-physics modeling of complex systems." The ASCE is the oldest national professional engineering society in the United States. The organization's mission is to "provide essential value to our members and partners, advance civil engineering, and serve the public good." ASCE fellows are legally registered professional engineers who have made significant technical or professional contributions and have demonstrated notable achievement in responsible charge of engineering activity for at least 10 years following election to the ASCE grade of member. As director of PNNL's Computational Sciences and Mathematics Division, Khaleel leads the effort to provide scientific and technological solutions through the integration advanced computing, mathematics, and computational sciences to advance the Laboratory's science, energy, and national security mission areas. He is also a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.  (Posted 5/1/2011)

Eric Richman selected IES Fellow

Eric Richman has been selected as a 2011 Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) Fellow. He was recognized at the society's Annual Conference, October 29 - November 1, in Austin, Texas. Eric also is a 2010 recipient of the Presidential Award for his exemplary efforts in support of IES, and is a past recipient of the Taylor Award for "An Empirical Data Based Method for the Development of Lighting Energy Standards."

IES is a collegial community whose mission is to "seek to improve the lighted environment by bringing together those with lighting knowledge and by translating that knowledge into actions that benefit the public."  (Posted 5/1/2011)

Seven PNNL Scientists Elected 2010 AAAS Fellows

Seven scientists from the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for their exceptional efforts to advance science and apply it to real–world problems. The PNNL honorees and the AAAS sections that elected them are: Leonard Bond, engineering; Liem Dang, chemistry; César Izaurralde, atmospheric and hydrospheric sciences; Allan Konopka, biological sciences; Jun Li, chemistry; Bill Morgan, biological sciences; and Greg Schenter, chemistry. This year's elections bring a total of 47 PNNL researchers who have been named AAAS fellows.

Leonard Bond


Elected for his contributions to engineering.

Bond specializes in developing methods and instruments that use ultrasound, a high-frequency sound that's inaudible to humans, to examine everything from cells to power plants. Often used to view a fetus inside a pregnant woman's belly, ultrasound hits an object and bounces back a signal that helps describe the object's makeup. He also uses computer models to better understand ultrasound wave movement and behavior. Bond currently uses ultrasonics to help inspect both aging nuclear power plants and advanced nuclear reactor systems, but he has also employed it to examine gas pipelines, rocket motors and defense systems, among other applications.

Bond is a PNNL laboratory fellow. He was also the founding director of the Center for Advanced Energy Studies at Idaho National Laboratory. He's a fellow of the U.K. Institute of Physics and a senior member of the Institute for Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

Liem Dang


Elected for his contributions to chemistry

Dang develops and uses computer models to study how molecules interact at liquid interfaces. His models specifically focus on the potential for molecules to be polarized, or have slight differences in electric charge, and how that affects molecular behavior at liquid interfaces. Dang and his then-postdoc, Tsun-Mei Chang, developed a widely used and cited chemical model called the Dang-Chang model, which accurately portrays the properties of water-based systems in changing environments. His research helps explain how pollutants react in the atmosphere and how toxic metals are transported across liquid interfaces.

Dang is a member of PNNL's molecular theory research group and a fellow of the American Physical Society. He's also an adjunct professor in chemical engineering at the University of Queensland, Australia, and is on the editorial board for the Journal of Physical Chemistry.

César Izaurralde


Elected for his contributions to atmospheric
and hydrospheric sciences

Izaurralde researches how carbon and nitrogen cycle within agricultural soil, and how soil, water and plants are affected by human actions and climate change. He has helped develop and improve computer models that examine climate change in agricultural systems and biogeochemical cycles in soil. Izaurralde has also contributed to several climate change assessments and is often asked to provide scientific information regarding climate change to policymakers. His research has advanced scientists' understanding of soil carbon sequestration as a tool to mitigate climate change and sustainability issues associated with biofuels production.

Izaurralde is a PNNL laboratory fellow at the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a collaboration between PNNL and the University of Maryland. He's a fellow of the Soil Science Society of America and the American Society of Agronomy and an adjunct professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Maryland.

Allan Konopka


Elected for his contributions to biological sciences

Konopka examines the ecology of microbes to understand how they adapt to changes in their habitats, including water and soil that's either above or below the Earth's surface. For example, he investigated how cyanobacteria, also known as blue-green algae, produce sugar polymers to sink so they can access nutrients lower in the water column and then get rid of the polymers to rise and take advantage of the sunlight they need for photosynthesis. He currently studies how microbial communities in below-ground soils affect the movement and chemical form of contaminants like radionuclides at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state.

Konopka is a PNNL laboratory fellow and is an associate director in PNNL's biological sciences research division. Before joining PNNL, he was a biological sciences professor at Purdue University for 30 years. He's on the editorial boards of the scientific journals Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Microbial Ecology and The ISME Journal.

Jun Li


Elected for his contributions to chemistry

Li focuses much of his research on lanthanides and actinides, heavy elements with the atomic numbers 57 to 71 and 89 to 103 on the bottom of the periodic table. To understand compounds made of these and other elements, Li develops computational models and considers the effects of relativistic quantum mechanics. He also uses theoretical models to explore metal clusters, surfaces and nanomaterials. His research can be used to advance methods that produce clean energy and remove pollution from the environment.

Li currently splits his time between EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory on PNNL's campus, and Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. He's an editorial board member for the Journal of Cluster Science and Current Chemical Biology.

Bill Morgan


Elected for his contributions to biological sciences

Morgan's research focuses on the biological effects of low-dose radiation on human health. He and his PNNL colleagues examine radiation's effects on humans by using a 3-D skin model. Morgan's research in cell and molecular biology, biochemistry and other fields helps protect people against radiation's adverse effects.

Morgan directs PNNL's radiation biology and biophysics low-dose radiation research program. He serves as a scientific representative for several national and international regulatory agencies. He is a consultant for the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. He's also an adjunct professor at Washington State University Tri-Cities, the University of Washington and the University of Maryland Medical School in Baltimore.

Greg Schenter


Elected for his contributions to chemistry

Schenter develops mathematical models to advance how scientists simulate molecular behavior. He calculates how small, light molecules and atoms move and react in solids and in solution. To do this, he considers the effects of quantum mechanics, a branch of physics. This research is helping build better batteries and alternative fuels. Schenter also developed a theory of how droplets form, or nucleate, that improved on previous theories and is changing the way scientists see cloud formation, fuel cells and more.

Schenter is a PNNL laboratory fellow, as well as a fellow of the American Physical Society. He has been a mentor to many scientists and students at the postdoctoral, doctoral, graduate and undergraduate levels.  (Posted 1/1/2011)

 

2011 Elected Positions and Offices

Joel Pounds Leads Review Panel for Lead Health Effects Report  (Posted 12/1/2011)

Dave Senor elected to Executive Committee for the ATR National Scientific User Facility

Dave Senor has been elected to serve on the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) User's Working Group Executive Committee. Dave's involvement in irradiation experiments at the ATR makes him well suited as a member of the five-person committee.

The ATR NSUF is a DOE user facility located at the Idaho National Laboratory. Nuclear energy researchers collaborate through the ATR NSUF to make advancements in basic and applied nuclear research and development to address the nation's energy security needs  (Posted 2/1/2011)

Amanda Casella named to ANS Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Division Executive Committee  (Posted 11/3/2011)

Licensing Executives Society (LES) Names Cheryl Cejka to Board of Directors as Trustee for Marketing  (Posted 10/19/2011)

Mikey Brady Raap Elected ANS Treasurer

Mikey has been elected to serve as Treasurer of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) in a national election. She will join a team of three other officers and a board of directors in the governance of the Society. Her term begins at 2011 ANS Annual Meeting in Hollywood, Florida on June 26.

ANS is an international, non-profit organization with a membership of more than 11,000 individuals representing more than 1,600 entities. Mikey has previously served as the chair and vice-chair of the ANS Nuclear Criticality Safety Division, and is a long time member of the education committee.  (Posted 6/1/2011)

PNNL's Ron Jarnagin installed as president of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air- Conditioning Engineers

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory engineer Ron Jarnagin was installed as president of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, or ASHRAE, at its 2011 Annual Conference in Montreal.

As president, Jarnagin will direct the Society's Board of Directors and Executive Committee.

ASHRAE's 50,000 worldwide members conduct research, analysis, continuing education courses and other services that advance the heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration industries. Much of ASHRAE's research is used to create governmental and industry standards. His term will last for one year.  (Posted 6/1/2011)

Amanda Casella elected to Executive Committee of the Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Division

Amanda Casella has been elected to the Executive Committee of the Fuel Cycle and Waste Management Division (FCWMD), a Professional Division of the American Nuclear Society (ANS). The nominees for committee positions are selected by their peers and determined during the yearly ANS elections.

FCWMD is one of the most active divisions within the ANS. In support of program development for national ANS meetings, the Executive Committee is tasked with providing a forum for technical discussions on topics relevant to the nuclear industry.  (Posted 5/1/2011)

Jun Liu Selected to Lead Prestigious Materials Meeting

Congratulations to Jun Liu, Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, on being chosen to lead the 2012 Materials Research Society Spring Meeting. This meeting provides 5,000-plus people from around the world the opportunity to discover and discuss the latest developments in materials research. Scientists from different disciplines present more than 50 top-notch scientific symposia.

Jun was selected as one of the four meeting chairs for this event because of his reputation in materials research. He is known for his contribution to nanomaterials, self-assembly, catalysis, and large-scale energy storage research. At PNNL, Jun leads the Transformational Materials Science Initiative, which is elucidating the underlying materials phenomena for vehicular and grid-scale energy storage. His research has appeared in numerous journals, received patents, and earned him awards, including an R&D 100 Award for self-assembled nanoporous materials.  (Posted 5/1/2011)

Praveen Thallapally Invited to Join CGD Network

The American Chemical Society has recently launched a new initiative - Crystal Growth & Design Network, or the CGD Network - and Praveen Thallapally, Energy and Environment Directorate, has been invited to join its Board of Community Editors.

The CGD Network is part of social networking and community website created by ACS. It provides users with a forum for interaction and collaboration on the topic of crystalline solids structures and the science of "crystal engineering." As a member of the board of editors, Praveen will make contributions to the community, initiate discussions monthly in his area of expertise, collaborate with other members of the board on strategic direction and advocate strongly on behalf of his CGD Network colleagues at conferences.  (Posted 3/1/2011)

Ranata Johnson to serve on IEEE Standards Committee

Ranata Johnson has been appointed Executive Secretary for the IEEE Software & Systems Engineering Standards Committee (S2ESC). She will be responsible for taking and maintaining minutes from teleconferences and meetings, and supporting the election ballot process.

Ranata has been an IEEE member since 1995. In addition to her role with the S2ESC, she also serves on the Configuration Management working group to update the 828 standard.

S2ESC strives to be essential to the global software and systems engineering community of technical professionals everywhere, and to be internationally recognized for the timely development and management of a comprehensive and integrated set of software and systems engineering standards of proven utility. The committee is part of the 85,000-member IEEE Computer Society, the world's leading membership organization for computing professionals.  (Posted 1/1/2011)

Guang Lin Chairs Panel at "Challenges in Geometry, Analysis, and Computation: High Dimensional Synthesis"

The goal of the Yale University conference: Bring together researchers to share advance connecting geometry, analysis, and applications; especially those related to the mathematics of data and information.  (Posted 11/9/2011)

David Atkinson Co-chairs Gordon Research Conference

David Atkinson has been selected as a chair of the Gordon Research Conference entitled: "Detecting Illicit Substances: Explosives & Drugs – Countering the Adaptive Adversary: The Revolution of New Materials and Creative Concealments" beginning June 26 in Lucca (Barga), Italy. David was the vice-chair of the 2010 conference.

As PNNL's Chief Scientist of Explosive Detection research, David provides leadership for PNNL's technical strategy in explosives detection. He is instrumental in engaging and advising government clients, influencing national priorities, and in multi-disciplinary program building. Because of his expertise in explosives detection, David is a sought after speaker at national conferences and society meetings.  (Posted 6/1/2011)

Bill Morgan Elected to Main Commission of International Commission on Radiological Protection

Congratulations to Dr. William Morgan, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who was elected to the Main Commission of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) at its Main Commission Meeting April 17-21 in Seoul, Korea. He was also named Chair of the ICRP's committee on Radiation Effects. Morgan will succeed Dr. Julian Preston, Associate Director for Health, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on October 31, 2011.

The ICRP is an independent, international organization that advances the science of radiological protection for the general public; in particular, by providing recommendations and guidance on all aspects of protection against ionizing radiation. The Radiation Effects Committee considers cancer and heritable disease risk together with the underlying mechanisms of radiation action. It also considers the risks, severity, and mechanisms of induction of tissue/organ damage and developmental defects. The committee consists of 20 radiation experts from 12 countries. Morgan has served on the committee since 2005 and is currently vice-chairman.

During his 30-year career, Morgan has gained an international reputation as a leading researcher in the fields of radiation biology and the long-term biological effects of radiation exposure. He is Director of Radiation Biology and Biophysics at PNNL, where he leads PNNL's Low Dose Radiation Research Program Scientific Focus Area, sponsored by the Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The PNNL program is focused on the effects of radiation exposure on human skin. Morgan also holds adjunct appointments at Washington State University-Tri-Cities and the University of Washington. He has authored or co-authored 130 publications and 53 book chapters, and proceedings papers.  (Posted 5/1/2011)

Pak Chung Wong selected member of editorial board for IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications

Pak Chung Wong, scientist in the Visual Analytics Group at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been selected as a member of the Editorial Board for IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications. The peer-reviewed publication, with an international circulation of more than 2,200 industry professionals, covers topics ranging from virtual reality to multimedia analytics. In his role, Wong helps determine the content of the journal by inviting peer reviews of content submitted by many of the computing graphics field's distinguished professionals.

IEEE is the world's largest professional association for the advancement of technology. Their highly cited publication, IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, bridges the theory and practice of computer graphics. Published six times a year, CG&A is indispensable reading for people working at the leading edge of computer graphics technology and its applications in everything from business to the arts.  (Posted 4/1/2011)

Nathan Baker appointed Editor-in-Chief

Nathan Baker, National Security Directorate, has been appointed editor-in-chief of Computational Science & Discovery. In his role Nathan will oversee peer review, lead the editorial board, and take responsibility for the scientific content and development of the journal. Nathan has served on the CSD editorial board since 2009 and will take up his new role May 1.

Nathan's diverse research background and interests make him a natural fit to lead a multidisciplinary computational science journal like CSD. He currently is chief scientist for Signature Science at PNNL. He is well known for his Adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann Solver software, which is freely available to the scientific community and now has more than 15,000 registered users.  (Posted 4/1/2011)

Xuesong Zhang Named JAWRA Associate Editor

Xuesong Zhang, Fundamental and Computational Science Directorate, has been named by the Journal of the American Water Resources Association as an associate editor for Artificial Intelligence and Advanced Computing.

Associate editors are responsible for assigning reviewers and evaluating reviews, and encouraging submissions in their area of expertise. The appointment is for three years. Xuesong is a research scientist at the Joint Global Change Research Institute.  (Posted 4/1/2011)

Bruce Napier elected to NCRP Board of Directors

Bruce Napier has been elected to serve on the Board of Directors of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). Bruce has been a member of the council for nine years and, during that time, has been on a variety of committees. As a board member, Bruce serves in the Environmental Radiation and Radioactive Waste Issues position.

The mission of the NCRP, an exclusive group of scientific experts, is "to support radiation protection by providing independent scientific analysis, information, and recommendations that represent the consensus of leading scientists."  (Posted 1/1/2011)

Robbie Tidwell - Elected to IHMM Board of Directors

Robbie Tidwell has been elected to a four-year term on the Institute of Hazardous Materials Managements Board of Directors. IHMM, a nonprofit organization, is the credentialing body for the Certified Hazardous Materials Manager (CHMM) designation. Robbie's position on the board began January 1.

IHMM's goal is to protect public health and safety through the administration of credentials for government, private, and corporate sectors. Institute members must demonstrate a high level of knowledge, expertise, and excellence in the management of hazardous materials.  (Posted 1/1/2011)

Jerry Johnson named to advisory board for InformationWeek

Jerry Johnson, PNNL Chief Information Officer (CIO), was named to the advisory board of InformationWeek, a publication focused on the business value of technology. The advisory board provides InformationWeek editors with insight into the issues and trends that are shaping business technology. For more info, read InformationWeek Announces New Advisory Board Members.  (Posted 1/1/2011)

 

2011 Impact on Scientific Community

Gourihar Kulkarni Awarded Competitive Small Business Technology Transfer Grant  (Posted 11/1/2011)

PNNL Researcher Part of Team to Receive INCITE Award  (Posted 11/1/2011)

CR&A Program Team: NVLAP grants re-accreditation of 318 Building's CLIR  (Posted 11/1/2011)

Deb Frincke chairs IEEE Symposium

Deb recently chaired IEEE's Symposium of Security and Privacy. In its 32nd year, the symposium is "the premier forum for presenting developments in computer security and electronic privacy, and for bringing together researchers and practitioners in the field." The symposium was co- sponsored by the IEEE Computer Society Technical Committee on Security and Privacy and The International Association for Cryptologic Research.

In the week following the symposium, there were more than a dozen articles published worldwide covering papers or work presented at the symposium in media outlets including the New York Times, New Scientist, IEEE Spectrum and PhysOrg.com.  (Posted 6/1/2011)

Adolfy Hoisie Serves as Guest Editor for Two Special Journal Issues  (Posted 12/1/2011)

Vanessa Bailey Appointed to Soil Science Journal Editorial Board  (Posted 12/1/2011)

Josh Adkins to Participate in Keck Futures Initiative Conference  (Posted 10/1/2011)

Greg Exarhos to Present Brazilian Scientific Congress Plenary Lecture

Congratulations to Dr. Greg Exarhos, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, on being invited to give a prestigious conference-wide talk at the Brazilian Congress on Applications of Vacuum in Industry and Science. At this annual event, held this year in Itajubá, in the Minas Gerais state of the Federative Republic of Brazil, fundamental and applied researchers exchange information on vacuum technologies and applications, including alternative energy solutions.

In his plenary talk, Exarhos will discuss how thin film vacuum deposition technologies and post deposition film modification have enhanced the performance of conjungate property films. Such materials combine multiple properties together in a non-intuitive way. For example, a conjungate property film could be both transparent and conduct electricity, making it ideal for use in solar photovoltaic or solid state lighting applications. In addition to giving his talk, Exarhos will actively participate in the graduate student poster session.

"Getting to talk with the students and being able to answer their questions, really engaging with them, makes the trip worth it," said Exarhos.

Having Exarhos give the talk was a natural choice because of his pioneering research in thin film deposition and properties modification. His studies have opened up venues in optical and electronic coatings and nanoscale material design. He is also active in the scientific community. Currently, he serves as Chair of the Governance Committee for AVS, a U.S. scientific society. He has served as AVS President, Board of Directors member, Publications Committee Chair, and Long Range Planning Committee Chair.  (Posted 8/1/2011)

Richard Moss Appointed Chair of NRC Committee on Human Dimensions of Global Change

Richard Moss, Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, was appointed Chair of the Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). Moss is a scientist at the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI), a partnership between PNNL and the University of Maryland. The National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academy of Sciences prepares scientific reports and advice for the U.S. government.

At JGCRI, Richard studies methods to support applications of global change research including scenarios, characterization and communication of uncertainty, and adaptation to climate change. Richard has served on other NAS committees such as the America's Climate choices science panel and is active on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

Previously, Richard served as Director of the Office of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (2000-06), Director of one of the IPCC's Technical Support Units (1993-99), and while on leave, as Vice President, Climate Change, of the World Wildlife Fund (2007-2009). Richard received the DOE Distinguished Associate award in 2003 for leading preparation of the U.S. government's 10-year climate change research plan.

"Richard has extensive experience working with federal global change agencies and has connections to international research activities. I value his ability to work with constituents of diverse perspectives," said Dr. Paul Stern, Staff Director at NAS, concerning Richard's work leading the committee.

The Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change includes both natural and social scientists and focuses on interdisciplinary research to inform global change policy. Examples of the committee's current interests include accelerating deployment of low-carbon energy technologies, integrating social and environmental data for research on vulnerable communities, assessing the potential climate and sustainable development benefits of reducing deforestation, and developing valuation methods to support environmental policy and decision making.  (Posted 8/1/2011)

Chris Mundy Gives Plenary Lecture at Theoretical Chemistry Conference

Congratulations to Chris Mundy, Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, on being invited to give a plenary talk at the American Conference on Theoretical Chemistry in July. This conference, held every three years, featured innovative ideas and new research. The event, which grew from a Gordon research conference, is widely attended by chemists from the United States and abroad.

In his plenary talk, Chris discussed the benefits and pitfalls of using density functional theory to understand the behavior of charged particles in water and at the air/water interface. Chris was chosen to give this talk based on his work in equilibrium and non- equilibrium statistical mechanics. He is also known for his work in ab initio and classical molecular dynamics development and applications. In addition, he leads large-scale simulations on leadership-class computers through a Department of Energy INCITE award.

"It feels good to be recognized by your peers—to be chosen to give a plenary lecture at the ACTC. It is quite an honor," said Chris.  (Posted 8/1/2011)

Diefenderfer

Heida Diefenderfer, Richard Anderson and Joshua Adkins invited to National Academies Keck Futures Initiative Conference

Three researchers from the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will convene with about 140 of the nation's top scientists and engineers to discuss how the world can develop a sustainable food supply while preserving the environment.

Restoration ecologist Heida Diefenderfer, risk and decision scientist Richard Anderson and systems biologist Joshua Adkins have been invited to participate in the ninth annual National Academies Keck Futures Initiative conference, to be held Nov. 10-13 in Irvine, Calif.

Richard Anderson

The conference brings together the country's leading researchers in diverse scientific fields to jointly tackle a complex, pressing problem with a multidisciplinary approach. This year's conference will focus on how to best balance the benefits that humans receive from ecosystems with the planet's environmental needs. Attendees can also compete for grant funding to pursue new ideas generated during the conference.

Diefenderfer has conducted research out of PNNL's Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim since 2000. She holds a doctorate in forest resources from the University of Washington, a master's degree in English from Western Washington University and two bachelor's degrees, one in Native American studies and professional writing from The Evergreen State College, and the other in biology from Reed College in Portland, Ore.

Joshua Adkins

Anderson has conducted research from PNNL's main campus in Richland since 2010. He holds a bachelor's degree in engineering mechanics, a master's degree in mechanical engineering and a doctorate in environmental systems analysis, all from John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Md.

Also based in Richland, Adkins has conducted research at PNNL since 2001. He holds a doctorate in biochemistry and molecular biology from Colorado State University in Fort Collins, Colo., and a bachelor's degree in chemistry and biology from Metropolitan State College in Denver, Colo.

The conference is supported by the National Academy of Science, the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Medicine and the W.M. Keck Foundation. More information is online at http://www.keckfutures.org  (Posted 6/1/2011)

Elizabeth Malone Appointed to NRC Committee on Himalayan Glaciers, Climate Change, and Implications for Downstream Populations

Congratulations to Dr. Elizabeth L. Malone on being appointed to the Himalayan Glaciers, Climate Change, and Implications for Downstream Populations Committee for the National Research Council. The committee will explore how climate change affects glaciers in the Himalaya, and how that will impact regional water supply systems. Glaciers are at the headwaters of several of Asia's major water systems and have an impact on drinking water, irrigation, food, and hydropower for billions of people.

As a scientist, Malone works on the areas of vulnerability and resilience to climate change. Looking across geographical boundaries, Malone studies the environmental and social aspects of global climate change. Glaciers are a large component of climate change, especially in Asia. Malone has expertise in addressing the impact of glaciers on the water cycle, combined with how precipitation may change in quantity and timing, which come together in the Himalaya. Malone was the principal author on a U.S. Agency for International Development report, Changing Glaciers and Hydrology in Asia: Addressing Vulnerabilities to Glacier Melt Impacts, which assessed how USAID programs could respond to the effects of climate change in this region of the world.

"Dr. Malone has a history of working across disciplines," said Dr. Maggie Walser, NRC study director for the committee. "Her expertise, particularly in the area of the human dimensions of climate change, will be quite valuable as the committee begins its work."

Malone is a scientist at the Joint Global Change Research Institute , a partnership between PNNL and the University of Maryland. The NRC, as part of the National Academy of Sciences, prepares scientific reports and advice for the U.S. government.  (Posted 6/1/2011)

Jim Fredrickson and Moe Khaleel Elected to Washington State Academy of Sciences

Congratulations to Jim Fredrickson and Moe Khaleel, both of Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate, on being elected to the Washington State Academy of Sciences. Jim and Moe are also PNNL Fellows.

Jim was chosen for his outstanding record of scientific accomplishments and national and international recognition. His research on environmental microbiology provides understanding of the roles of microbes in the biotransformation of radionuclides in the subsurface and in the cycling of metals. Results from his research have provided new mechanistic insights into how microbes alter the mobility of environmental contaminants at locations such as the Hanford site as well as how they weather and form minerals. He is co-principal investigator on two of PNNL's Scientific Focus Areas for the Department of Energy's Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program and Genomic Science Program.

Moe was selected based on his international leadership in computational engineering sciences and fuel cell technology. He is known for his contributions to the development and deployment of solid oxide fuel cells and superplastic forming of aluminum alloys. As director of PNNL's Computational Sciences and Mathematics Division, Moe leads the effort to provide scientific and technological solutions through the integration of advanced computing, mathematics, and computational sciences to advance the Laboratory's science, energy, and national security mission areas.

The Washington State Academy of Sciences provides expert scientific and engineering analysis to inform public policy-making. Also, the Academy works to increase the role and visibility of science in the State of Washington. The Academy was established in 2005.  (Posted 6/1/2011)

Changyong Zhang, Mart Oostrom, Nancy Hess and Thomas Wietsma author paper selected one of "10" Best Papers of 2010" by Environmental Science & Technology journal

A paper authored by PNNL – EMSL researchers was selected by Environmental Science & Technology as one of the journal's 10 "Best Papers of 2010." Of the nearly 1,500 papers that ES&T published last year, the editors nominated 70 to be among the very best. This list was narrowed to the top 10 and then divided between three categories: Environmental Science, Environmental Technology and Environmental Policy. In March, the paper, "Pore-Scale Study of Transverse Mixing Induced CaCO3 Precipitation and Permeability Reduction in a Model Subsurface Sedimentary System," was named second runner-up in the Environmental Technology category. The paper documented the team's work to provide insights into carbon sequestration and contaminant cleanup, and how, due to mixing, changes in groundwater chemistry affect subsurface mineralization. Specifically, researchers examined under what conditions pores within underground rock formations become clogged with newly formed minerals due to changing groundwater chemistry. They found that calcite mineralization can sometimes block pores and prevent further reactions by stopping groundwater mixing—which has implications for immobilizing contaminants in the groundwater or geological storage of greenhouse gases such as CO2.

The team is composed of PNNL researchers Changyong Zhang and Mart Oostrom, EMSL researchers Nancy Hess and Thomas Wietsma, and four researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Karl Dehoff, Albert J. Valocchi, Bruce W. Fouke, and Charles J. Werth.  (Posted 5/2/2011)

Guang Lin invited to Give Poster Presentation at SciDAC Conference

Dr. Guang Lin, a computational mathematics researcher at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been invited to give a poster presentation at the prestigious 2011 Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) conference in July. In conjunction with the invitation to present, he has also been invited to prepare a five-page paper for the peer-reviewed conference proceedings.

Lin is a staff member in PNNL's Computational Sciences & Mathematics Division. His talk "Modeling and Simulation of High Dimensional Stochastic Multiscale Partial Differential Equation Systems" will focus on research efforts to address current limitations on the science of uncertainty quantification (determining the variation of the likely outcome of research in a probabilistic way for risk assessment and decision support when not all the model input data is known) and to develop novel methods for modeling and predicting systems for use in extreme scale computing.

Along with highlighting successes from the SciDAC program, the conference is also slated to be a "general celebration of computational science." The conference brings together computational scientists from different nations, agencies, programs, and scientific fields to highlight recent advances in computational science in important areas – from understanding our universe on its largest and smallest scales, to understanding Earth's climate change and its ramifications, to developing new energy sources.  (Posted 5/1/2011)

John Holladay named FY10 PNNL Inventor of the Year

More than 140 staff members were honored at the PNNL annual Recognition & Rewards Banquet—held May 19 at the Three Rivers Convention Center—for their contributions to the creation, development and commercialization of intellectual property. Honorees received patents, developed commercially valuable software products, made key contributions to technology commercialization efforts, and received Federal Laboratory Consortium and R&D 100 Awards in FY10. Jay Grate, Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate, was recognized for becoming a Battelle Distinguished Inventor last fiscal year.

John Holladay, Energy & Environment Directorate, received the highest honor of the night when he was named PNNL Inventor of the Year for FY10. Each year, the recipient of this award is selected by PNNL management based on their innovation over the previous two fiscal years that has resulted in the creation of intellectual property, or the potential to create intellectual property.

John received six patents in FY10 alone for work in diverse areas, all unified by the use of renewable feedstocks for the creation of value-added chemicals. Several of his most recent patents were for work to convert sorbitol—available from corn—to isosorbide for creation of novel polymers that are sought after for hot fill beverage containers, replacements for hot filter juice and beer bottles, and engineered thermoplastics.

During his 10 years with the Laboratory, John has overseen significant growth in research volume, particularly in catalyst capability at the Bioproducts, Sciences and Engineering Laboratory, and in sustainability analysis as PNNL seeks to improve the science base for conversion of biomass with respect to understanding water and land use impacts. Much of his research to date has involved the development of new catalysts and processes for conversion of a variety of biomass feedstocks to chemicals. His current research continues down this path, specifically directed at using combinatorial techniques to solve problems in the area of condensed phase heterogeneous catalysis.

John is responsible for PNNL's $18 million research portfolio including biofuels, products and energy—ranging from sustainable utilization of terrestrial biomass and marine systems to fuels and chemicals via chemical and biological catalysis. He has 10 granted U.S. patents and 22 U.S. and foreign patents pending.  (Posted 5/1/2011)

Mark Murphy: Article and cover photo in Fertility and Sterility Journal

Mark Murphy's research into protecting fertility in cancer patients has been published in Fertility and Sterility, including a photo on the cover. The results of the study, conducted in partnership with Oregon Health and Science University, demonstrated incredible promise for a drug treatment that may positively impact tens of thousands of women every year. Mark additionally developed a device to protect monkeys during radiation treatments throughout the study.

Fertility and Sterility is an international journal for doctors, scientists and others who treat and investigate problems of infertility and human reproductive disorders. Mark's article appeared in the March 15 issue.  (Posted 3/1/2011)

 

2010 Awards

U.S., Swiss Team Earns INCITE Award Around Complex Reactions

Scientists from PNNL and Switzerland's University of Zurich received 20 million hours of computing time to answer fundamental questions about catalysts, thanks to the 2011 INCITE Leadership Computing award. Managed by the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, the awards provide large, computationally intense projects with time on certain supercomputers. The acronym INCITE stands for Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment. This is the second INCITE award PNNL has received.

Using the Cray XT at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the team will investigate processes that occur at the liquid/air interface of titanium-and nickel-based catalysts. Specifically, the team will perform intense calculations to accurately estimate reaction free energetics, the internal forces that drive a reaction towards equilibrium, in complex chemical environments. The researchers believe this work will show that the combination of electronic structure, statistical mechanics, and leadership-class computing will assist in controlling and creating catalysts that are essential for renewable energy.

On this INCITE award, the team members are Shawn Kathmann, Simone Raugei, Roger Rousseau, and Greg Schenter, all of Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, and Juerg Hutter and Joost VandeVondele of the University of Zurich. The team is led by Christopher Mundy, also of Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate.

This INCITE award and our previous one establish PNNL as a player in large-scale calculations for computational chemistry, said Bruce Garrett, director of Chemical and Materials Sciences at PNNL.  (Posted 11/1/2010)

Jamie Holladay receives 2010 Merit Review Award from DOE's Hydrogen Program

Jamie Holladay is the recipient of a 2010 Annual Merit Review Award from DOE's Hydrogen Program. As the awardee in the Production and Delivery category, Jamie was recognized for his outstanding contributions as part of DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Hydrogen Production and Delivery Team, including the development of the Hydrogen Production Roadmap - Technology Pathways to the Future.

Each year, hydrogen and fuel cell projects funded by DOE's Hydrogen Program are reviewed for their merit. This year's awards were presented at the Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7 - 11, in Washington, D.C.

 (Posted 7/1/2010)

Guang Lin receives 2010 ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge Award

Guang Lin, a computational mathematics researcher in the Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been selected to receive a 2010 ASCR Leadership Computing Challenge (ALCC) award.

The ALCC program allocates up to 30% of the computational resources at the Leadership Computing Facilities at Argonne, Oak Ridge, and NERSC and for special situations of interest to the Department with an emphasis on high-risk, high-payoff simulations in areas directly related to the Department's energy mission in areas such as advancing the clean energy agenda and understanding the Earth's climate, for national emergencies, or for broadening the community of researchers capable of using leadership computing resources.

Lin's proposal "Stochastic Nonlinear Data-Reduction Methods with Detection & Prediction of Critical Rare Events" will be allocated five million processor hours over the next year on the Jaguar supercomputer located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The project focuses on extracting and reducing data from massive volumes of information to quantify and reduce the uncertainty in the climate models. If successful, this research project will have a revolutionary impact on how scientists analyze petascale, noisy, incomplete data in complex systems and ultimately lead to better future prediction and decision-making.  (Posted 7/1/2010)

Wei-Jun Qian Receives DOE Early Career Research Grant

Congratulations to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist Dr. Wei-Jun Qian for receiving an Early Career Research Award from the Department of Energy. He will develop a suite of quantitative proteomics technologies to gain understanding of the spatial and temporal regulation of cellular functions. Funding for this 5-year research grant is under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. Qian will receive $500,000 a year to cover year-round salary plus research expenses.

In this project, called "Spatial and Temporal Proteomics for Characterizing Protein Dynamics and Post-Translational Modifications," PNNL researchers will demonstrate the effectiveness of the technology suite on environmental eukaryotes-organisms whose cells contain complex structures inside the membranes-such as Aspergillus niger, a fungus that plays an important role in biofuel production and global carbon cycling.

Qian has been at PNNL since 2002. His research involves developing and applying novel mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics approaches for accurate and sensitive quantification of protein dynamics in cells, tissues, and biofluids. He is currently focusing on developing more sensitive targeted protein quantification based on selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-mass spectrometry to complement global proteomics discovery. His work has enabled broad applications in various biological systems, and a number of the developed technologies have been applied to study cell signaling and biomarker discovery involved in different diseases such as diabetes.  (Posted 6/1/2010)

Catalysis Researchers Named First Distinguished PNNL Post-Doc Fellows

Congratulations to Dr. Grant Johnson of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Dr. Xiao Lin of the Fritz Haber Institute on being selected as the first recipients of the Pacific Northwest Distinguished Post-Doctoral Fellowship. Through the fellowship program, they will receive funding to conduct their catalysis research at PNNL for the next 2 to 3 years.

"We believe strongly in building the next generation of scientists and in advancing the frontiers of science," said Dr. Steven Ashby, deputy director for science and technology at PNNL. "I'm pleased we'll be able to expose these scientists to the unique capabilities, instrumentation and experts at PNNL while we also learn from their new ideas."

Johnson completed his doctorate in chemistry at Pennsylvania State University . There, he focused on analyzing the use of different types of oxygen in reactions stemming from metal oxide catalysts. At PNNL, Johnson's research will focus on using mass spectrometry to create new catalytic materials.

Lin has most recently worked as a Humboldt Fellow at the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society in Germany. He received his Ph.D. from the Chinese Academy of Sciences. While at PNNL, Lin will develop a molecular-level understanding of how metals catalyze reactions involving carbon monoxide and dioxide. These reactions are vital to supplying energy, global warming, and the chemical industry.

In 2009, PNNL created the Pacific Northwest Distinguished Post-Doctoral Fellowship to attract outstanding researchers and build the future of scientific leadership for the Laboratory. These post-doc fellows receive a competitive salary, benefits, and relocation expenses. In addition, they have the potential to receive extra funding for travel and conferences. Both will conduct research at the Department of Energy's EMSL, a national scientific user facility at PNNL  (Posted 3/1/2010)

Wendy Shaw, William Gustafson, and Uljana Mayer to receive five-year grants

Three scientists from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will receive an Early Career Research Award from the Department of Energy, including funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for five-year research grants. All three researchers will receive grants for at least $500,000 a year to cover year-round salary plus research expenses.

The three PNNL researchers receiving this award and their grant titles are:

  • Wendy Shaw, "Catalyst Biomimics: A Novel Approach in Catalyst Design," funded by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences
  • William Gustafson, "Reducing Scale Dependence of Physics Parameterization for Global Cloud Resolving Climate Models," funded by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research
  • Uljana Mayer, "Targeted Imaging Probes for Systems Biology," funded by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

As part of the DOE's new Early Career Research Program, this new effort is designed to bolster the nation's scientific workforce by providing support to exceptional researchers during the crucial early years, when many scientists do their most formative work.

To be eligible for an award, a researcher must be an untenured, tenure-track assistant professor at a U.S. academic institution or a full-time employee at a DOE national laboratory, who received a Ph.D. within the past ten years.

Awardees were selected from a pool of 1,750 university- and national laboratory-based applicants. Selection was based on peer review by outside scientific experts.  (Posted 2/1/2010)

PNNL Postdoc Wins DOD Breast Cancer Fellowship Award

Congratulations to Dr. Hongjun Jin, a biochemistry postdoctoral fellow at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who won a U.S. Department of Defense postdoctoral fellowship for breast cancer research. In this 3-year, $250K project, he will determine post-translationally modified biomarkers for the early detection of breast cancer. The research will further strengthen PNNL's protein microarray platform.

Thousands of top breast cancer postdoctoral researchers from across the U.S. applied for this fellowship, out of which 43 were recommended for funding. Jin, who joined PNNL in 2008, received his Ph.D. in biochemistry from Texas A&M University and bachelor's degrees in Radiochemistry and Medicine from Lanzhou University and Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, respectively.  (Posted 2/1/2010)

Team Earns 2010 INCITE Award from DOE

Scientists from PNNL and two Swiss institutes received 12 million hours of supercomputing time, thanks to the 2010 INCITE Leadership Computing award from DOE. Now, the team will be able to continue running calculations that explain the physics of reactions in bulk and at interfaces.

"Understanding the reactions that occur in the vicinity of interfaces have far-reaching implications in many disciplines," said Christopher Mundy, Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate. Furthermore, the supercomputers will be put to use to elucidate how water behaves around ions at the air/water interface. The results of these studies will be used as leverage to help scientists control processes for hydrogen storage, biofuel production and other reactions.

The members of this research team are Christopher Mundy, Roger Rousseau, Greg Schenter and Shawn Kathmann, all of Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate; Allesandro Durioni of IBM Research-Zurich and Joost VandeVondele of the University of Zurich.

The INCITE award grants access to supercomputers to model complex processes and analyze large data sets. The team received a total of 12 million hours on two DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Research supercomputers: the Cray XTs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the IBM Blue Gene/P at Argonne National Laboratory.

More Info  (Posted 2/1/2010)

Researchers to receive five-year grants

Three scientists from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory will receive an Early Career Research Award from the Department of Energy, including funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for five-year research grants. All three researchers will receive grants for at least $500,000 a year to cover year-round salary plus research expenses.

The three PNNL researchers receiving this award and their grant titles are:

  • Wendy Shaw, "Catalyst Biomimics: A Novel Approach in Catalyst Design," funded by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences
  • William Gustafson, "Reducing Scale Dependence of Physics Parameterization for Global Cloud Resolving Climate Models," funded by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research
  • Uljana Mayer, "Targeted Imaging Probes for Systems Biology," funded by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

As part of the DOE's new Early Career Research Program, this new effort is designed to bolster the nation's scientific workforce by providing support to exceptional researchers during the crucial early years, when many scientists do their most formative work.

To be eligible for an award, a researcher must be an untenured, tenure-track assistant professor at a U.S. academic institution or a full-time employee at a DOE national laboratory, who received a Ph.D. within the past ten years.

Awardees were selected from a pool of 1,750 university- and national laboratory-based applicants. Selection was based on peer review by outside scientific experts.  (Posted 2/1/2010)

Postdoc

Jordan Smith to Receive Best Postdoc Publication Award

Congratulations to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory environmental toxicologist Dr. Jordan Smith who will receive the 2011 Best Postdoctoral Publication Award from the Society of Toxicology (SOT). The award recognizes exceptional papers in the field of toxicology published from postdoctoral research in 12-month period.

His publication "Pharmacokinetics of the chlorpyrifos metabolite 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol (TCPy) in rat saliva" appeared in the February 2010 issue of Toxicological Sciences. Smith will receive his award at the SOT Annual Meeting in Washington, DC in March.

Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphate insecticide widely used in U.S. agriculture. Smith's research uses experimental and computational methodology to investigate pharmacokinetics and biological effects of pesticides, specifically regarding biosensor development and risk assessment of potentially sensitive populations, such as children.

Reference: Smith JN, J Wang, Y Lin, and C Timchalk. 2010. "Pharmacokinetics of the Chlorpyrifos Metabolite 3,5,6-Trichloro-2-Pyridinol (TCPy) in Rat Saliva." Toxicological Sciences 113: 315-325.  (Posted 12/1/2010)

Bill Bair Receives Health Physics Society Top Honor

Battelle retiree Bill Bair (1994) has received the Robley D. Evans Commemorative Medal from the Health Physics Society. The society's highest award, the Evans Medal is not awarded every year. Bill is the ninth to receive the medal since its inception in 1997, and the first researcher from a national laboratory.

The award presentation read in part, "Dr. William J. Bair, the 2010 recipient of the Robley D. Evans Commemorative Medal, has been a pioneer and mentor in the field of radiation biology and health physics all of his professional life: he is now in his seventh decade of service and leadership in the toxicology of and protection from internally-incorporated radioactive materials."

"It was quite an honor to be nominated by the local HPS chapter," Bill says. "PNNL deserves credit for providing me the opportunity to do everything that led to this award. Credit also is due the many staff members who supported me through the years."

Bill retired in 1994 as the manager of the Life Sciences Center following a 29 year career with Battelle and ten years with General Electric Hanford Laboratories.  (Posted 11/1/2010)

Landsberg

Jerry Allwine to Receive Prestigious Helmut E. Landsberg Award

Congratulations to Dr. Jerry Allwine, who was selected as the recipient of this year's Helmut E. Landsberg Award from the American Meteorological Society. Allwine, who retired from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in 2008, will accept the award in January at an AMS gathering in Seattle. Allwine served more than 25 years as a PNNL senior scientist in the fields of atmospheric sciences, fluid dynamics, and mathematics.

The Helmut E. Landsberg Award is given to an individual or team for outstanding contributions in the fields of urban meteorology, climatology, or hydrology. This includes measurements or modeling that provides an improved understanding of atmospheric processes in urban environments, and/or enhanced urban meteorological or air quality forecasting capabilities.

Allwine's contribution to the field of meteorology was cited: "For his work as chief scientist and manager of the four urban field experiments carried out under the Urban Dispersion Program, and for sustained research contributions to applied dispersion model development and testing."

Allwine led four multi-scale, atmospheric dispersion studies in diverse urban areas from 2000 to 2005. The studies involved national and international scientists who sampled, studied, and modeled the complex patterns of atmospheric and meteorological contaminant dispersion around buildings, through urban areas, and into surrounding regions. The results of this work made a significant contribution to understanding the complex processes of atmospheric dispersion of contaminants in urban areas, which helped create emergency response models, evacuation, and cleanup plans for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, and the U.S. Department of Defense.  (Posted 10/1/2010)

Nik Qafoku selected to receive Citation of Excellence from Soil Science Society of America Journal

Nik Qafoku received a Citation of Excellence for Associate Editors related to his service as an Associate Editor for the Soil Science Society of America Journal. Nik is serving his fifth year as an Editorial Board Member and Associate Editor of the discipline of soil chemistry. Soil Science Society of America Journal is ranked number one in the world for the number of citations (2008 Journal Citation Report, ISI Web of Knowledge).  (Posted 7/1/2010)

George Deverman, John Fulton, Dean Matson, and Clem Yonker Receive ACS Northwest Regional Innovation Award

Congratulations to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's John Fulton, George Deverman, Dean Matson, and Clem Yonker on winning the American Chemical Society's Regional Industrial Innovation Award. The award celebrates innovations that have contributed to the good of society. The team was chosen for their e-RESS coating process which is being used by Micell Technologies to create vascular stents that are less likely to become blocked by tissue.

"I get very excited that this research could have an impact on the quality somebody's life," said Fulton, one of the lead researchers on this project.

In the e-RESS or Electro-static Rapid Expansion of Supercritical Solutions process, a tissue-inhibiting drug is dissolved in a supercritical fluid at high pressure and temperature. The solution is expanded through a small nozzle into a chamber at atmospheric pressure. The expansion produces nanoparticles of the polymer/drug coating.

The nanoparticles are electrostatically "harvested," free of the solvent, and precisely layered onto the stent. The drug slowly elutes, preventing tissue growth from re-blocking the artery. When the drug is gone, the underlying polymer slowly degrades. By the time the polymer is gone, the body has adjusted to the bare metal stent. Clinical trials are planned for the end of 2010.

The e-RESS process was born of research done by Fulton, Deverman, Matson, and Yonker for the U.S. Department of Energy's Basic Energy Sciences . They were conducting research to expand U.S. knowledge of supercritical fluids, such as carbon dioxide and water. This BES-funded research was instrumental in conceiving the e-RESS process.

The award was presented at the 65th Northwest Regional Meeting of the American Chemical Society.  (Posted 7/1/2010)

Dan Strom Receives American Academy of Health Physics National Service Award

Dan Strom received the National Service Award from the American Academy of Health Physics (AAHP). The award, presented at the annual Health Physics Society (HPS) meeting in July, recognizes meritorious service and is awarded to individuals deemed most helpful to an Academy president during their term of office.

Special recognition was also given for Dan's work to organize and implement the AAHP Special Session on Radiation Dose Reconstruction for Epidemiology at the HPS annual meeting.  (Posted 6/1/2010)

Ron Jarnagin earns ASHRAE Exceptional Service Award

Ron Jarnagin received the Exceptional Service Award on June 26, 2010, at the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers 2010 Annual Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico. ASHRAE is an international organization of 51,000 persons.

The award recognizes Ron for serving the Society faithfully and with exemplary effort, which has helped ASHRAE contribute technological advances for the benefit of industry and the public.  (Posted 6/1/2010)

Deb Frincke Selected for IEEE Award

Deb Frincke, National Security Directorate, has been selected for the IEEE 2010 Northwest Area Outstanding Leadership and Professional Service Award. The award recognizes IEEE members who "through their professional and technical abilities have made outstanding and noteworthy contributions to the Institute, their communities, fellow professionals and fellow man."

Deb is a key contributor to the Laboratory's research agenda development in cybersecurity research at PNNL. She is also a recipient of numerous teaching/outreach awards, and is currently working with the University of Washington and has supported the successful development of the institution's application for NSA/DHS Center of Excellence status. Deb is a member of several editorial boards and many national and international program committees  (Posted 6/1/2010)

Local IEEE-PES chapter wins High Performing Chapter Award

Yousu Chen, chapter chair, accepted a 2009 award for a High Performing Chapter in the IEEE Power and Energy Society. Chapters qualifying for this award must demonstrate leadership in membership and chapter website development, student and educational activities, and membership recognition programs just to name a few.

Other PNNL staff members contributing to this outstanding effort are Jason Fuller, Zhenyu (Henry) Huang, Steve Widergren, Ning Zhou, Hong (Amy) Qiao, Yan Shi, and Frank Tuffner.  (Posted 5/1/2010)

Jerry Posakony

Jerry Posakony Honored with AAES John Fritz Medal

Jerry Posakony, National Security Directorate, has been honored by the American Association of Engineering Societies (AAES) for his pioneering contributions to the fields of ultrasonics, medical diagnostic ultrasound and nondestructive evaluation technologies.

AAES has awarded the John Fritz Medal annually since 1902 as a memorial to the engineer and 15th president of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers who bears its name. Past recipients include Alexander Graham Bell (1907), Thomas Edison (1908), Alfred Nobel (1910), Orville Wright (1920) and Guglielmo Marconi (1923).

Jerry has devoted much of his career to developing important technologies that have touched nearly everyone's life, from medical diagnostics to industrial applications that help ensure product quality and safety.

He devoted nearly 60 years of his career to designing, developing and deploying first-of-a-kind nondestructive evaluation inspection and measurement systems, in particular ultrasonic transducers and the associated circuits and systems. Jerry was also involved in developing industry standards for that type of instrumentation. Most recently, Jerry's research and consulting efforts are in the field of sonochemistry and sonoluminescense, the emission of short bursts of light from imploding bubbles in a liquid when excited by sound.

More Info...
Contact: Geoff Harvey, 509 372-6083  (Posted 3/1/2010)

Siva Pilli "New Faces of Engineering 2010" honoree

Congratulations to Siva Pilli, who is one of 13 "New Faces of Engineering 2010." Siva and the other honorees were recognized as part of National Engineers Week activities and were prominently featured in a USA Today ad on February 16 2010.

The New Faces of Engineering program highlights the interesting and unique work of engineers 30 years of age or younger, and the resulting impacts on society.

Siva's current research focus is on developing seal materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, conducting structural integrity evaluations of underground nuclear waste storage tanks, and assisting with reviews of license renewal applications for nuclear power plants.  (Posted 2/1/2010)

Wally Weimer accepts NWFPA 2010 Cluster Partner of the Year

Wally Weimer recently accepted the "2010 Cluster Partner of the Year" Award on behalf of Battelle/PNNL. Awarded by the Northwest Food Processors Association (NWFPA), the award recognizes the Laboratory for its work to develop a rapid pathogen detection technology for food processors.

Tests currently available to detect the food pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes, can take up to 36 hours to produce results. The NWFPA hopes to reduce this detection time to only eight hours with the use of PNNL's technology. Wally, manager of the Hydrocarbon Conversion product line, has been the primary PNNL point of contact with the NWFPA.  (Posted 11/1/2011)

year

Dick Smith Named R&D's 2010 Scientist of the Year

Parkinson's disease, cancer, and biofuels production are just a few problems Dick Smith has helped untangle in his long career of technological innovation and scientific insight. Now, R&D Magazine has honored Smith, PNNL's Director of Proteomics and Battelle Fellow, as 2010 Scientist of the Year for his many significant contributions to science.

Smith is one of the most-published scientists in the field of proteomics, which seeks to understand biology by the complement of proteins at work within organisms, tissues, or cells. Since the Human Genome Project developed a blueprint of all human genes in human chromosomes earlier in this century, proteomics researchers have pushed to understand how the blueprint creates life.

Over the last 15 years Smith has led the development of measurement platforms that have made proteomics practical. In the last few years, he has driven efforts that trimmed analytical steps from days and hours to minutes. The increase in speed has opened important new areas for study. Smith led other advances in sensitivity and accuracy that greatly improved clinical researchers' ability to find rare proteins, bringing proteomics technology to their doorstep.

Smith and collaborators applied the technology to liver disease and cancer in the hopes of finding rare markers of disease in blood, making diagnosis or treatment safer and faster. Smith also looked at how bacteria and viruses might cause illnesses, investigated traces in the blood left behind by breast cancer that in the near future may be exploited by doctors, led studies for DOE into possible roles for microbes in making biofuels and examined how large environmental communities of microbes function in our ecosystem and affect our environment.

Much of Smith and his group's cutting-edge technology — including mass spectrometers beefed up with ion funnels, electrospray ionization and other new technologies he has been key in developing — is housed at EMSL, DOE's Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory on the PNNL campus, and a number of the developments have been licensed to private companies.  (Posted 11/1/2010)

Jennifer States Earns 2010 Rising Star Award from Women of Wind Energy

Jennifer is the recipient of the Rising Star award from the Women of Wind Energy. The award, which was presented at the American Wind Energy Association's WINDPOWER 2010 Conference in May, honors women relatively new to the wind energy field who demonstrate unusual talent, dedication and innovation in the industry.

WoWE recognizes Jennifer as "a motivated individual who has the skills, interest and passion to address the barriers to wind energy through private activity and public sector work."  (Posted 10/1/2010)

Tarang Khangaonkar, Zhaoqing Yang and Stephen Breithaupt contribute to award-winning fish protection project

Zahoqing Yang Photo

Stephen Breithaupt Photo

Tarang, Zhaoqing and Stephen are recognized for their roles in Portland General Electric's Selective Water Withdrawal Project, a recipient of the Edison Electrical Institute's Edison Award. The team was instrumental in the design development of the world's first floating surface fish collection facility coupled with power generation. The facility is located at the Round Butte Dam in Oregon.

The Edison Award is the electric utility industry's highest honor and recognizes outstanding leadership, innovation, and exceptional contributions to the field.  (Posted 10/1/2010)

Jennifer States earns Women of Wind Energy's 2010 Rising Star Award

Jennifer States is the recipient of the Rising Star Award from the Women of Wind Energy. The award, which was presented at the American Wind Energy Association's WINDPOWER 2010 Conference in May 2010, honors women relatively new to the wind energy field who demonstrate unusual talent, dedication and innovation in the industry.

WoWE recognizes Jennifer as "a motivated individual who has the skills, interest and passion to address the barriers to wind energy through private activity and public sector work."  (Posted 10/1/2010)

Four PNNL Scientists Elected to the Washington State Academy of Sciences

Four scientists from PNNL have been elected to the Washington State Academy of Sciences. They join other scientists and engineers from across the state who have been recognized for outstanding scientific achievement. As members, they will review and assess initiatives and provide state policymakers with scientific counsel.

initiatives and provide state policymakers with scientific counsel. The newly elected WSAS members are: Allan Konopka, Fundamental and Computational Sciences, Richard D. Smith, Fundamental and Computational Sciences, and Ron Thom, Energy and Environment Directorate. The award was also presented posthumously to James Thomas, formerly of National Security Directorate, in recognition of his significant scientific accomplishments.

The academy was created in 2005 and is made up of more than 100 members from diverse academic disciplines and industries, including aerospace, agriculture, computer science, energy, engineering, ecology and transportation.

More Info...  (Posted 9/1/2010)

Zachara Receives Highest Battelle Honor

Veteran geochemist John Zachara has been named a Battelle Fellow, a rank shared by only three other scientists at PNNL.

The honor recognizes John, who's been at PNNL for 31 years, for his scientific accomplishments, leadership and long record of service as advisor to multiple DOE offices.

John, Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, is a nationally recognized expert on how contaminants such as uranium or chromate flow underground and react with sediments, rocks and water. For decades he has studied the complex subsurface environment below Hanford where years of weapons-grade nuclear materials production released radioactive and chemical materials to the ground and subsurface. In the process, he solved many perplexing issues.

For example, John has led a team trying to determine why a decades-old uranium plume underneath Hanford hasn't dispersed as predicted 15 years ago. The team found that high Columbia River flows in the spring cause fluctuations in the groundwater water table that allow uranium to move from sediments above the aquifer. And when the nuclear fission byproduct known as cesium 137 traveled faster underground than anticipated at another location, John found that residual heat and high salt concentrations from the wastes unexpectedly affected how water and minerals reacted with the cesium.

John also has collaborated with microbiologists to understand how bacteria and other tiny organisms influence the movement of contaminants in harsh geochemical environments that were previously thought to be lifeless. Some microorganisms can slow down or stop contaminants by packing them inside newly formed minerals, in the process removing the toxic substances from water.

"He's gotten a handle on some of the most extreme environments with respect to chemistry, temperature and radiation," said Doug Ray, Associate Laboratory Director for Fundamental & Computational Sciences. "And what he's learned can be generalized to many other legacy waste sites, as well as applied to the challenge of understanding geologic and terrestrial sequestration of carbon dioxide and other fossil fuel emissions."  (Posted 9/1/2010)

Nathan Baker Receives National Cancer Institute's Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG ) Connecting Collaborators Award

Nathan Baker received the award at the 2010 caBIG Awards Ceremony for his work in expanding the Nanotechnology Working Group from a few academic institutions to over 20 different organizations, including several federal agencies, standards bodies, international coalitions, and academic institutions.

The caBIG Connecting Collaborators Award recognizes an individual or organization working to connect multiple institutions in support of collaborative research. The award reflects the significant contributions by individuals or teams that have been made to the program.  (Posted 9/1/2010)

Jewel Adgerson Receives Technology Rising Star Award

Jewel Adgerson, National Security Directorate at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, is among 138 women recognized by the Career Communications Group and Women of Color magazine as a "Technology Rising Star." Awarded annually, the industry-recognized "Technology Rising Star" award is presented to young, minority women working in the technology arena who have demonstrated extraordinary achievement in their workplace and communities. Jewel's colleagues nominated her for the award for her outstanding contributions to the Laboratory in the two years she has been here. Wayne Martin, National Security Directorate, commented, "Jewel is one of the young up-and-coming engineers in NSD."

Jewel is recognized for her research in electrical and materials applications. Jewel's work to understand these complex processes has contributed to an understanding of the issues related to system engineering. Jewel has conducted research work related to analog and digital electronic system design. She has proven herself extremely valuable to her research team and continues to grow. Jewel also has discovered another talent - mentoring students and other young scientists and engineers. She has found several opportunities to engage students assigned to her organization. Because of these abilities, she is now involved the NSD Minority Serving Institution Initiative. The purpose of the initiative is to establish research and development relationships with professors to develop joint research projects and identify hiring prospects for our research groups.

Additionally, Jewel has been involved with many community service projects. She has a focus on minority and other underrepresented individuals in the fields of science and engineering. Both during the year and summer, Jewel personally mentors students in programs such as Mickey Leland.

When asked what her reaction was when she received the news about the award, Jewel responded, "I have learned so much about the needs of our nation and how I believe I best fit into the solution. I am truly thankful for all of my mentors and those who I have worked with and have gleaned knowledge from. My hope is that I continue to make my mark throughout the Lab and in the community."  (Posted 8/1/2010)

Dave Heldebrant Named Among Best and Brightest Innovators in the Energy Labs

Dave Heldebrant was named one of 12 Best and the Brightest Innovators in the Energy Labs by Innovation, America's Journal of Technology Commercialization. Dave, whose photo appeared on the cover of the publication's April/May 2010 issue, was featured in the article "How to Control Coal Emissions."

Dave's work focuses on reducing carbon dioxide emissions, particularly in coal-fired power plants. Dave and his team have developed a liquid carbon capture solution, CO2BOL, that shows promise in an effort to reduce our carbon footprint and help combat global warming.  (Posted 6/1/2010)

Dick Smith Named One of Innovation Magazine's "Best and the Brightest"

Congratulations to Wiley Research Fellow Richard D. (Dick) Smith on being named 1 of the 12 Best and the Brightest Innovators in the Energy Labs in the April/May 2010 issue of Innovation, a journal of technology commercialization. The article "Dick Smith: A Most Prolific Inventor" can be viewed online at http://innovation-america.org/index.php?articleID=638.

Smith, chief scientist and director of proteomics at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, holds 37 U.S. patents, 9 of which have resulted in R&D 100 Awards for high technology products. Among his numerous other awards are the recent 2010 Eastern Analytical Symposium Award for Outstanding Achievements in the Fields of Analytical Chemistry, the 2009 HUPO (Human Proteome Organization) Discovery Award in Proteomics Sciences, and the 2003 Award in Analytical Chemistry from the American Chemical Society.  (Posted 6/1/2010)

Terence Critchlow invited to participate in 2010 NAE Frontiers of Engineering Symposium

Terence Critchlow, a chief scientist in the Computational Sciences & Mathematics Division at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been selected to participate in the National Academy of Engineering's 16th Annual U.S. Frontiers of Engineering symposium. The event brings together the country's outstanding young engineers from industry, academia, and government to discuss pioneering technical and leading-edge research in various engineering fields and industry sectors.

"As we face the challenges the next century brings, we will rely more than ever on innovative engineers," said NAE President Charles M. Vest. "The U.S. Frontiers of Engineering program is an opportunity for a diverse group of this country's most promising young engineers to gather together and discuss multidisciplinary ways of leading us into the economy of tomorrow."

Terence is one of 87 engineers selected from among approximately 265 applicants. His research interests are focused in the areas of large-scale data management, data analysis, data integration, meta-data, data dissemination and scientific workflows. In particular, current projects for both science and security customers include research in multi-dimensional data dissemination, OLAP, link analysis, and extending workflow capabilities within the Kepler workflow engine.

The symposium will be held Sept. 23-25 at the IBM Learning Center in Armonk, N.Y., and will examine cloud computing, autonomous aerospace systems, engineering and music, and engineering inspired by biology.  (Posted 6/1/2010)

Guo-Shuh John Lee honored with Parravano Award for Excellence in Catalysis R&D

Congratulations to EED's John Lee, who was honored with the 2010 Michigan Catalysis Society Parravano Award for Excellence in Catalysis Research and Development. The society recognized John for his outstanding work in all aspects of catalytic process chemistry, with particular emphasis on contributions to mordenite related chemistries. The society also applauded his ability to facilitate interactions between the R&D and business communities toward the development of novel catalytic processes. John joined PNNL in fall 2009 after a distinguished research career at The Dow Chemical Company. At PNNL, his work currently is focused on developing techniques for upgrading the quality of oil produced from biomass.  (Posted 2/1/2010)

 

2010 Fellowships

Liem Dang Named American Physical Society Fellow

Congratulations to Dr. Liem Dang at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on being selected a Fellow in the American Physical Society. Dang was honored for his contributions to the physics community. Specifically, he was chosen for developing and applying molecular dynamics simulation methods and reliable polarizable potential models for studying processes in solution and at liquid interfaces. In addition, he was recognized for modeling ionic and organic molecule transport.

A member of the Chemical Physics and Analysis Group at PNNL, Dang is active in the scientific community. He has written or co-written 100-plus articles on chemical physics and theoretical chemistry. He is a member of the editorial board for the Journal of Physical Chemistry. Also, he works with students, mentoring new scientists as adjunct faculty at the University of Queensland, Australia.  (Posted 12/1/2010)

Greg Kimmel Named American Physical Society Fellow

Congratulations to Dr. Greg Kimmel at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on being elected a Fellow in the American Physical Society. He was recognized for his seminal contributions to understanding the structure and electron-stimulated reactivity of interfacial water. His studies, using low-energy electrons to mimic radiochemical reactions on surfaces, provide a detailed understanding of the physical and chemical processes occurring there. Kimmel is also known for his work on the structure of nanoscale water films at surfaces and interfaces. His research has identified a "hydrophobic" water layer that grows on a hydrophilic substrate, and a novel two-layer crystalline ice that grows on hydrophobic substrates. His research provides insights into the behavior of water, whether it is in fuel cells or on the icy moons of Europa.

"In a lot of cases, water gets pretty complicated pretty fast," said Kimmel. "That's what keeps this research so interesting."

His research has resulted in invitations to give talks at national and international conferences. For example, he gave an invited talk on electron stimulated reactions in thin water films at a recent Gordon Conference. Also, he spoke on hydrophobic water monolayers at ECOSS24 in Paris, France. His research has appeared in Science, Physical Review Letters, and numerous other journals.  (Posted 12/1/2010)

Yong Wang

Yong Wang Named Fellow of American Chemical Society

Yong Wang, associate director of the Institute for Interfacial Catalysis at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and Voiland Distinguished Professor in the Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering at Washington State University, has been named a Fellow of the American Chemical Society, or ACS.

Fellows are recognized for their exceptional accomplishments in chemical science and the profession, as well as their service to the ACS.

Wang, an internationally known researcher in the area of energy and renewable energy, has a joint appointment with the Department of Energy national laboratory and WSU. A portion of Wang's appointment also is funded by WSU's Agricultural Research Center, the state's agricultural experiment station.

He is a leading researcher in the area of catalysis and biorenewable energy, where his work has had a significant impact on improving energy efficiency, particularly in the chemical and fuels industries.

Wang's work spans from fundamental to applied research in clean energy conversion, including fundamental studies of structure and functional relationships of transition metal oxide and bimetallic catalysts, development of novel catalytic materials, and innovative work in reaction engineering to improve the conversion of biomass and hydrocarbons to fuels and chemicals. He also developed novel and durable materials for fuel cell applications.

Wang is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. The Chinese Institute of Engineers also named him the 2006 Asian American Engineer of the Year. He is the recipient of three prestigious R&D 100 awards, which annually recognize 100 of the most significant and innovative technologies that have been introduced in the marketplace. He is recipient of the Presidential Green Chemistry Award in 1999 and was twice named PNNL Inventor of the Year, in 2004 and 2006. He was honored as a Battelle Distinguished Inventor in 2004. In 2005 he received the PNNL Laboratory Director's Award for Exceptional Scientific Achievement. Wang earned a master's of science degree and doctorate in chemical engineering from Washington State University in 1992 and 1993.

Wang has co-authored more than 130 peer reviewed publications, has given more than 60 invited presentations over the past five years, is an inventor/co-inventor of more than 100 issued patents, and has edited six books and topic journal issues on novel materials and reaction engineering for fossil and biomass conversions. ACS is the world's largest chemical science professional society, with more than 161,000 members. The group publishes 38 professional journals.  (Posted 7/1/2010)

bruce Kay

PNNL's Bruce D. Kay named American Chemical Society fellow

A second scientist at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been named a 2010 American Chemical Society fellow, Chemical & Engineering News reported this week.

Experimental chemical physicist Bruce D. Kay is among 192 researchers nationwide who the American Chemical Society, also known as ACS, is recognizing for their outstanding contributions to science and the profession of chemistry.

"Whether it's making new materials, finding cures for disease or developing energy alternatives, these fellows are scientific leaders, improving our lives through the transforming power of chemistry," Chemical & Engineering News quoted ACS President Joseph Francisco as saying.

Kay joins chemical engineer Yong Wang, who has a joint appointment with PNNL and Washington State University, in this year's list of ACS fellows. PNNL and WSU announced Wang's election in July.

Kay's research seeks to gain a basic understanding of how chemical reactions occur on surfaces. In particular, he examines the molecular behavior of glassy, flash-frozen water, called amorphous solid water. He freezes ultra-thin layers of water vapor onto super-cold surfaces to understand how ice molecules move and interact with others molecules. Amorphous solid water is thought to be the most common form of water in the universe, though it's not prevalent on Earth. Better understanding its behavior will help astrophysicists in their studies of stars and planets. And studying how amorphous ice behaves as it's heated is providing important information that could unravel the mysteries of terrestrial liquid water.

Kay's research also focuses on catalysis, or chemical reactions driven by catalysts. The work could make current energy sources more efficient, help the world tap alternative energy sources and reduce the environmental impact of energy use. Kay specifically explores how catalysts help break the molecular bonds of certain chemical compounds and then form other bonds to make new compounds. He looks at how oxide catalysts can more efficiently speed up reactions involving water and alcohol, among other materials.

Kay is also a fellow of several other scientific societies, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society, the American Vacuum Society and the International Union for Pure and Applied Chemistry, also known as IUPAC. He joined PNNL in 1991 and is a PNNL Laboratory Fellow. Kay has published more than 130 peer-reviewed papers. He earned a doctorate in chemical physics from the University of Colorado at Boulder and a bachelor's degree in chemistry from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

ACS is the world's largest chemical science professional society. The complete list of 2010 ACS fellows can be found online at http://pubs.acs.org/isubscribe/journals/cen/88/i31/html/8831acsnews4.html  (Posted 7/1/2010)

Theva Thevuthasan named AVS Fellow

EMSL Capability Steward Theva Thevuthasan has been named a Fellow of AVS, the American Vacuum Society. The honor recognizes scientists who have made sustained and outstanding technical contributions to AVS and the scientific community for at least 10 years.

The AVS cited Thevuthasan's "significant and sustained contributions to the understanding of physical and chemical properties of surfaces and buried interfaces."

He is a recognized leader and author in ion beam modification and analysis of oxide materials with applications in resolving energy and environmental issues. In addition, Thevuthasan is well-recognized within AVS for his service to the professional society. For example, he has served as chair of the Short Course Executive Committee for AVS. In that role, he's focused on developing education programs that will increase participation in these short courses. He also is lead organizer for a two-day topical conference in in-situ microscopy and spectroscopy.

Mike Henderson, a Laboratory Fellow in PNNL's Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate and also an AVS Fellow, nominated Thevuthasan for the honor. Thevuthasan will receive his award at a ceremony during the AVS 57th International Symposium and Exhibition scheduled for Oct 17 - 22 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

This is an honor reserved for no more than .5 percent of AVS membership each year.

Thevuthasan leads EMSL's Interfacial Spectroscopy and Diffraction Group. He has been with EMSL since 1993. He has authored or coauthored more than 175 peer-reviewed scientific journal publications, 40 peer-reviewed proceedings papers, numerous technical reports, one patent, and two invention reports in his areas of expertise.  (Posted 7/1/2010)

Gene Carbaugh Elected Health Physics Society Fellow

Congratulations to Gene Carbaugh on his election to Fellow status in the Health Physics Society. He'll be inducted at the HPS Annual Meeting in late June in Salt Lake City. Fellows are senior members of the Society who have been nominated and elected by peers for making significant administrative, educational, and/or scientific contributions to the profession of health physics.

Gene joined PNNL in 1980 and currently manages the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program. He's a Certified Health Physicist who has established himself as one of the leading applied internal dosimetrists in the nation and is known for his many contributions to the health physics profession.  (Posted 6/1/2010)

Michael Brambley and Srinivas Katipamula honored as ASHRAE Fellows

Two staff members in the Energy & Environment Directorate, Mike Brambley and Srinivas Katipamula, were elevated to the grade of Fellow in the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). ASHRAE bestows Fellow status on members who have attained distinction in the fields of heating, refrigeration, air conditioning, ventilation or the allied arts and sciences. Honorees must have made substantial professional contributions and have been a member in good standing for at least ten years.

Mike's elevation to Fellow was based on contributions in research and development, technical publications, and significant technical contributions to the arts and sciences.

His expertise in developing, testing and evaluating technologies for improved building energy efficiency has yielded multiple innovations. Mike shepherded the development of the first energy design tool fully integrated into a commercial building computer-aided design environment, and led a team that created foundational elements of the Energy Expert building efficiency software tool. He also has been a pioneer in the study of self-correcting, fault-tolerant controls for heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems.

Srinivas was recognized by ASHRAE for research, development and deployment in areas related to applied heat transfer, energy conservation, and demand response, as well as energy end-use technologies.

He's known for his expertise in the field of automated fault detection and diagnostics for building systems. He has made significant contributions in this discipline through his algorithms and software tools, a number of which are in use today in the field. His RD&D, technical publications and software development all have a common focus-improving the operating efficiency of existing buildings.  (Posted 1/1/2010)

 

2010 Elected Positions and Offices

Deb Frincke joins National Media Advisory Board

Deb Frincke joins the GovInfoSecurity Advisory Board, bringing a research perspective to the editorial content on this highly visible website for Information Security professionals. GovInfoSecurity.com is an educational portal specializing entirely on information technology risk management. GovInfoSecurity has 15,000 registered users, representing all walks of government, primarily senior management and technical personnel from local, state and federal agencies of the U.S. government.

Deb Frincke is a Chief Scientist in Cyber Security at PNNL, and is the Initiative Leader on the Information and Infrastructure Integrity Initiative. The goal of this research is to extend the Laboratory's research and development capability related to the resilience of large-scale digital computer and control infrastructures, the communications within those infrastructures, and the soundness of information contained/ transported by the infrastructures.  (Posted 11/1/2010)

Jim Morris and Kathy Ertell Appointed to National DOE Human Research Board

Congratulations to Dr. James Morris, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, on his recent appointment as Chair of the Central Department of Energy Institutional Review Board, or CDOEIRB, DOE's national Institutional Review Board. Ms. Kathy Ertell, PNNL Operational Systems, was also appointed to the board. The CDOEIRB reviews and approves all DOE complex-wide human research.

The CDOEIRB assures that risks to human participants involved in DOE beryllium-related studies, the Former Worker Medical Screening Program, and future research involving emerging issues and/or technologies under the board's purview are minimized and reasonable in relation to anticipated benefits. The board also assures that the rights and welfare of study participants are protected in accordance with applicable Federal regulations, state laws, DOE directives, existing ethical principles, and professional practice standards.

Morris has chaired PNNL's Institutional Review Board since 2007. He holds a Ph.D. in immunology, and has conducted research in biological monitoring and modeling at PNNL since 1973. Ertell manages PNNL's Human Research Protection Program, holds a M.S. in environmental health, and has 20 years of experience in environmental and occupational health research and consulting.  (Posted 5/1/2010)

Dave Atkinson and Dave Thurman Appointed to Key Roles in Homeland Security

In support of Homeland Security programs, Dave Atkinson and Dave Thurman have been appointed leadership roles in multi-lab, aviation security working groups established in response to the December 25 airline bombing attempt. Dave Atkinson is co-leading the emerging technology team of the Interagency Aviation Security Working Group. Dave Thurman is a key member of a multi-lab data & information analysis team supporting the National Counterterrorism Center.  (Posted 1/1/2010)

president

Ron Jarnagin President-elect of ASHRAE

Ron Jarnagin is President-Elect of ASHRAE. An international organization of more than 52,000 persons, the American Society of Heating, Refrigeration, and Air-Conditioning Engineers strives to advance the arts and sciences of heating, ventilating, air conditioning and refrigeration for the betterment of mankind and to promote a sustainable world. With a focus on the energy aspects of buildings and building systems, Ron has long been active in ASHRAE. He has previously served on the Board of Directors and as both an officer and director.  (Posted 11/1/2010)

SigmaXi

Kelly Sullivan Elected Sigma Xi President

For the second time, a scientist at PNNL has been elected president of Sigma Xi, one of the largest and most prestigious international science and engineering honor societies.

At Sigma Xi's annual meeting in Raleigh, N.C., Kelly Sullivan, PNNL institutional partnerships and postdoc program manager, was elected president of the 125-year-old society. Her term as president-elect will begin July 1, 2011 and she will become president on July 1, 2012.

With nearly 50,000 members in 100 countries, Sigma Xi associate members are invited to join only after showing potential in scientific research. Full membership is granted to those who have demonstrated noteworthy scientific achievements. Society membership has included renowned scientists Albert Einstein and Linus Pauling, DNA discoverers Francis Crick and James Watson, physicists Enrico Fermi and Richard Feynman and geneticist Barbara McClintock, along with more than 200 other Nobel laureates. "It is quite humbling to be recognized by such a prestigious body, and I feel particularly honored, because the last PNNL scientist elected president of Sigma Xi was Bill Wiley," Kelly said in reference to the former PNNL director. Bill served as Sigma Xi's president-elect, but passed away in 1996 before he became president.

Bill and Kelly are the only DOE national laboratory scientists to be elected to the Sigma Xi's top office.

"Sigma Xi is a true trans-disciplinary organization with a rich blend of scientists who share ideas from different fields. This is a very nice compliment to our research approach at PNNL," Kelly said. "It is an important organization, particularly for younger researchers who find an instant professional network, both within and outside of their disciplines."

Before becoming director of institutional partnerships at PNNL, Kelly's research focused on the electronic structure and stability of small molecules and ions of atmospheric and mass spectrometric interest. More recently, she played a key role in the Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable at the National Academies, leading efforts in STEM education. She is active in Sigma Xi, serving in several leadership roles, as well as president of the society's Tri-Cities, Wash. Chapter.  (Posted 11/1/2010)

Kathy Hibbard Appointed Chair of the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting Program Committee

Congratulations to Dr. Kathy A. Hibbard, who recently accepted the honor to serve as chair of the American Geophysical Union (AGU) Fall Meeting Program Committee. Her three-year term of office begins in January. She will also serve as an ex-officio member of the Meetings Committee through 2013.

Hibbard has more than 25 years of experience in the atmospheric sciences. With more than 30 peer-reviewed journal articles, reports, and book chapters, and more than 1600 citations since 1991, Hibbard is recognized for her expertise in the consequences of human activities with terrestrial biogeochemical cycles and their interactions with the climatic and ecological systems. She holds a Ph.D. in Rangeland Ecology and Management from Texas A&M University. Hibbard has been an AGU member since 1994.

In her role on the Meetings Committee, Hibbard will help guide the organization in responding to the needs of the geophysical community and collaborate with established partners to plan, structure, and manage AGU meetings, fulfilling the strategic goals of the Union.

Established in 1919, AGU promotes the science of Earth and space in cooperation with national and international scientific organizations. AGU publishes more than a dozen peer-reviewed journals and technical publications, sponsors scientific meetings and scientific and educational events to promote understanding from Earth and oceans to atmosphere, space, and planets.

For more information about AGU, visit their website.  (Posted 10/1/2010)

Jim Fredrickson Elected to International Society for Microbial Ecology Board

Congratulations to Dr. Jim Fredrickson on his election to the board of directors of the International Society for Microbial Ecology. He was elected to a 4-year term at the close of the ISME's general meeting in Seattle August 22-27, which Fredrickson chaired.

ISME is the principal scientific society for the burgeoning field of microbial ecology and its related disciplines. The society fosters the exchange of scientific information by organizing international symposia and workshops, sponsoring publications, and promoting education and research.

Fredrickson, an international leader in environmental microbiology, is a Laboratory Fellow and Senior Chief Scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Academy of Microbiology and serves on the Editorial Board of Geobiology, Environmental Microbiology, and Microbial Biotechnology.  (Posted 9/1/2010)

Steve Ghan Reappointed to Journal of Geophysical Research Editorial Board

Congratulations to Steve Ghan, recently re-appointed to another 4-year term as editor for the Atmospheres section of the Journal of Geophysical Research, published by the American Geophysical Union (AGU). In his role as editor, Ghan has the authority to accept or reject papers, as well as the responsibility for attracting new and interesting research to the journal. He and his co-editors have emphasized timeliness in the manuscript review process, consequently reducing the review time by two weeks.

Ghan is highly recognized for his expertise in developing, evaluating, and applying parameterizations for climate models, including aerosol interactions with clouds. He holds a Ph.D. in Meteorology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The AGU is a worldwide scientific community that, through cooperative research, advances the understanding of earth and space for the benefit of humanity. It publishes more than a dozen peer-reviewed journals ranging from earth and oceans to atmosphere, space, and planets.  (Posted 8/1/2010)

Bing Liu elected Chair of project committee

Newly elected Chair of the project committee to develop the 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small to Medium Offices

In order to achieve 50% energy savings over the minimum code-compliant buildings, ASHRAE, DOE and their partner organizations are developing a series of design guides. Bing has been elected as the Chair of the project committee for the 50% AEDG for Small to Medium Offices. The AEDG provides recommendations to building owners, design professionals and consultants so they may design buildings with low energy use and high performance without having to resort to detailed modeling analyses.

Bing has worked for a number of years on the 30% AEDG guides and is well known for her expertise and contributions in building energy savings.  (Posted 7/1/2010)

Karin Rodland Named U.S. HUPO Board Member

Congratulations to Dr. Karin Rodland on being selected for the U.S. Human Proteome Organisation (HUPO) Board of Directors. HUPO is an international scientific society representing and promoting proteomics through international cooperation and collaborations. As a member of the U.S. Board of Directors, Rodland will planning strategic and scientific meetings. In addition, she will work to increase HUPO's membership. Her term on the board lasts for three years.

Rodland, lead for National Institutes of Health programs at PNNL, is known for her outstanding proteomics research. Her reputation in applying proteomics to biomarker discovery is evidenced by highly cited review articles and her prominent role in organizing sessions at scientific meetings, such as the International Association for Cancer Research. Her publication record includes 56 peer-reviewed publications, 5 invited review articles, and 5 peer-reviewed publications from 2006 to the present. She holds two patents in DNA technology.  (Posted 3/1/2010)

Debbie Dickman Appointed INMM Chair

Debbie Dickman, National Security Directorate, has been appointed chair of the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management's (INMM) newly established Education and Training Committee. PNNL's leadership role in nonproliferation and international safeguards/security education and training was recognized by Debbie's recent appointment to this position. The INMM created the committee to address long and short-term strategies to grow and sustain core competencies in the nonproliferation and nuclear materials management workforce. The newly created committee has a number of components, including international education and training collaboration, student career fairs and INMM student chapter initiatives, student scholarship programs, and student paper competitions.  (Posted 2/1/2010)

Daniel J. Gaspar named chair of ASTM International Committee E42

ASTM International Committee E42 on Surface Analysis has named Daniel J. Gaspar, technical group manager at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, as its chairman. Committee E42 develops concepts and approaches that help improve quantitative surface analysis, and its 67 members currently oversee 30 ASTM standards in this area. A member of ASTM International since 2001, Gaspar works on several E42 subcommittees, including the U.S. Technical Advisory Group to ISO TC 201 on Surface Chemical Analysis.  (Posted 2/1/2010)

Matthew Barnett and John Glissmeyer Part of ANSI N13.1 Committee

Matthew Barnett, Operational Systems Directorate, has been selected as a member on the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N13.1, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. This standard is an air monitoring standard of radioactive effluents in the United States and has also been adopted by other countries that do not have standards (e.g., South Korea, Argentina).

Because of technology and knowledge capability changes, each standard has a lifespan of 10 years. Matthew will be part of the reformed committee to take the 1999 version and refine, implement and address core areas. The committee is a cross-section of different types of organizations that use the standard. Matthew represents the DOE user community. He is the Radioactive Air Task Lead at PNNL; he is also an adjunct faculty member at the Washington State University Tri-Cities. He actively supports DOE's implementation of 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart H.

John Glissmeyer Photo

Another PNNL staff member, John Glissmeyer, Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, chairs the N13.1 working group for the Health Physics Society. He also chairs the corresponding working group for the International Standards Organization. While an employee of PNNL, John has performed research and development of air monitoring solutions for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission/DOE sites, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the U.S. Department of Defense since 1975.

ANSI has served in its capacity as administrator and coordinator of the U.S. private sector voluntary standardization system for more than 90 years. Throughout its history, ANSI has maintained as its primary goal the enhancement of global competitiveness of U.S. business and the American quality of life by promoting and facilitating voluntary consensus standards and conformity assessment systems and promoting their integrity. ANSI also promotes the use of U.S. standards internationally, advocates U.S. policy and technical positions in international and regional standards organizations, and encourages the adoption of international standards as national standards where they meet the needs of the user community.  (Posted 12/1/2010)

Jim Fredrickson and Allan Konopka Join Editorial

Congratulations to Dr. Jim Fredrickson and Dr. Allan Konopka, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, who recently accepted invitations to join the advisory board of The ISME Journal for a 3-year term. As members of this international board, Fredrickson and Konopka will help define the journal's scope and provide scientific input.

Fredrickson is recognized internationally for leading research programs investigating the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of geologically diverse subsurface environments. He is a Laboratory Fellow and Senior Chief Scientist at PNNL and was recently elected to the ISME's board of directors.

Allan Konopka

Konopka, an internationally known microbial ecologist, is a Laboratory Fellow at PNNL. He heads PNNL's Microbiology Group and is leading efforts on analysis of microbial communities and the development of novel technologies to develop a mechanistic understanding of microbial community ecology.

The ISME Journal is the official journal of the International Society for Microbial Ecology. It publishes research and reviews in the rapidly expanding area of microbial ecology. The journal is a member of the Nature family of journals and has an impact factor of 6.379 in only its second full year.  (Posted 10/1/2010)

journal

Chuck Henager Joins Advisory Editorial Board of The Journal of Nuclear Materials

Chuck Henager has accepted a position on the Advisory Editorial Board of The Journal of Nuclear Materials. In this position, he will provide paper reviews and recommend or author papers on key topics, as well as have opportunities to influence the Journal's future directions. In his invitation letter, Dr. Mansur, Chairman of Editors, wrote: "I hope that such an appointment would be an indication of your own high level of personal accomplishment." The Journal of Nuclear Materials publishes high quality papers relevant to nuclear fission and fusion reactors and high power accelerator technologies.  (Posted 10/1/2010)

Charles Long to Serve on The Open Atmospheric Science Journal Editorial Board

Congratulations to Dr. Charles Long, who accepted an invitation to be on the editorial board of The Open Atmospheric Science Journal , published by Bentham Science Publishers. The journal is a relatively new open-access online peer-reviewed publication, free to readers worldwide. Using an all-electronic format, the journal rapidly publishes original research articles, short articles, and review articles in all areas of climate research and atmospheric science.

Long specializes in the study of clouds and their effect on the surface radiation energy balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. He is the Tropical Western Pacific Site Scientist for the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. He is internationally sought after in the scientific community based upon his reputation in the field. Long currently has 51 published papers in peer-reviewed atmospheric science journals, 17 technical reports, and over 80 conference proceedings publications. He is also an invited coauthor for the World Meteorological Organization Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment's (GEWEX's) Radiative Flux Assessment chapter on surface observations, and an appointed member of the Global Energy Balance Working Group of the International Radiation Commission (IRC).  (Posted 10/1/2010)

Dick Smith Elected to Second Term on HUPO Board

Congratulations to Dick Smith on being elected to a second 3-year term on the Human Proteome Organization (HUPO) board of directors following the HUPO World Congress in Sydney, Australia, in September. HUPO is an international scientific organization representing and promoting proteomics through international cooperation and collaborations by fostering the development of new technologies, techniques, and training.

Dr. Smith, a Battelle Fellow at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has extensive experience in developing new approaches and platforms for proteomics, as well as in the broad applications of proteomics in biological research. He is Director of the National Institutes of Health Biomedical Technology Resource Center for Integrative Biology and the U.S. Department of Energy High Throughput Proteomics Facility at EMSL, a Department of Energy scientific user facility located at PNNL.

Dr. Smith has presented more than 350 invited or plenary lectures at national and international scientific meetings, and is the author or co-author of more than 750 publications. He holds 38 patents and has been the recipient of ten R&D 100 Awards, the 2003 American Chemical Society Award for Analytical Chemistry, and the 2009 HUPO Discovery Award in Proteomics Sciences.  (Posted 10/1/2010)

David Koppenaal Appointed to Editorial Board of Metallomics

Congratulations to David Koppenaal, who has been named a member of the Editorial Board for Metallomics, a journal of the Royal Society of Chemistry. Metallomics publishes research on the role of metals in biology. The Editorial Board sets journal policy and advises the RSC about themed issues, reviews, tutorials, and other issues. Dr. Koppenaal is a Fellow of the RSC, the largest organization in Europe for advancing the chemical sciences.

Dr. Koppenaal will serve a 2-year term on the Board. This follows his recent service on Metallomics' International Advisory Board. He is a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Fellow who leads the Biological Separations and Mass Spectrometry Group within PNNL's Biological Sciences Division. Dr. Koppenaal also serves as Chief Technology Officer at EMSL, a Department of Energy scientific user facility located at PNNL. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and currently serves as program chair of the Analytical Chemistry Division of the American Chemical Society. He co-edited the recently published second edition of the Encyclopedia of Spectrometry and Spectroscopy.  (Posted 10/1/2010)

Cesar Izaurralde Appointed as Editorial Board Member of a New Peer-Reviewed Journal

Congratulations to Cesar Izaurralde, who recently accepted an invitation to be an editorial board member of new peer-review scientific journal called "Advances in Climate Change Research," sponsored by the National Climate Center and supervised by the China Meteorological Administration.

A soil scientist with more than 30 years of research experience in agronomy, soil science, and ecosystem modeling, Izaurralde's expertise and research is critical to a greater understanding of anthropogenic climate change, one of the central scientific and political issues of the 21st century.

This new quarterly journal seeks to improve the scientific understanding of adaptation and mitigation policy making; enhance the implementation of scientific research in socio-economic sustainable development; and enhance international cooperation and negotiations regarding climate change.  (Posted 9/1/2010)

Sriram Somasundaram selected ABET Program Evaluator

Sriram Somasundaram has been selected as a program evaluator with ABET, the recognized accreditor for college and university programs in applied science, engineering, and engineering technology. In this role, he will help evaluate Mechanical Engineering departments around the world.

Sriram recently completed his first campus visit to the University of North Carolina, Charlotte. ABET accredits over 3,000 programs worldwide and in their latest cycle, has over 315 requests in 19 countries.  (Posted 9/1/2010)

Evangelina Shreeve Named to Governing Board for Pacific Northwest Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation

Evangelina Shreeve, Organizational Development Directorate, has been named to the Pacific Northwest Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (PNW LSAMP) Governing Board. The PNW LSAMP is funded by the National Science Foundation and is a collaborative effort between educators, universities and STEM diversity advocates in Washington, Oregon and Idaho. The goal of PNW LSAMP is to increase the underrepresented student participation in STEM majors through enhanced recruitment, internships, workshops, scholarships and research opportunities.

For over 18 years, Evangelina has provided leadership in diversity and higher education for a variety of organizations including the University of Washington, Columbia Basin College and most recently with PNNL.

At PNNL, Evangelina is responsible for providing leadership, direction and assessment of the STEM Education efforts in pre-college, secondary and post-secondary programs, including the DOE Workforce Development for Scientists and Teachers; work-based learning programs, such as internships and fellowships, and also inclusion and engagement strategies that relate to education programs and early career development at PNNL.  (Posted 8/1/2010)

Subhash Singhal Elected to WSAS Board

Subhash Singhal, Energy and Environment Directorate, has been elected to the Board of Directors for the Washington State Academy of Sciences. WSAS, a non-profit organization created by the state legislature, conducts commissioned studies and prepares scientific reports on issues of public importance to the state of Washington.

Subhash is a world leader in solid oxide fuel cells. He provides senior technical, managerial and commercialization leadership to the PNNL fuel cell program. In 2008, he was named one of 104 founding members of the WSAS. The scientific academy represents many academic disciplines and diverse industries, including aerospace, agriculture, computer science, energy, engineering, ecology and transportation.  (Posted 8/1/2010)

Darrell Fisher invited member of AREVA Med's High-Level Science Advisory Committee

Darrell Fisher has been named as one of five members of a new, high-level science advisory committee formed by AREVA Med to support rapid development of new radiopharmaceuticals for cancer treatment. AREVA Med LLC is a subsidiary of the French nuclear energy company AREVA. As a specialist in isotope production and medical radiation dosimetry, Darrell will provide strategic advice and scientific guidance for product development and testing leading to regulatory approval of new radioimmunotherapy drug products targeting ovarian and breast cancer. The new drugs employ lead-212/bismuth-212-labeled antibodies.  (Posted 8/1/2010)

Guang Lin Invited to Serve on Editorial Board for International Publication

Guang Lin, a computational mathematics researcher in the Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been invited to serve on the editorial board for the prestigious International Journal for Uncertainty Quantification. The publication features information in the areas of analysis, modeling, design, and control of complex systems in the presence of uncertainty across all areas of physical and biological sciences. Lin will lead the team that reviews submissions and makes recommendations on which manuscripts to accept for publication. The 11-member editorial board includes representatives from other national laboratories, as well as universities and industry.

Lin is a member of PNNL's Computational Mathematics group. His research focuses on high-order numerical methods for stochastic partial differential equations, uncertainty quantification, computational fluid dynamics, petascale data analysis and dimensional reduction techniques, extreme-scale computing, and multiscale modeling.

Lin has been highly involved in investigating high-order numerical methods for stochastic partial equations, uncertainty quantification and petascale data analysis. He is the principal investigator on a project funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) that focuses on extracting and reducing data from massive volumes of information to quantify and reduce the uncertainty in the climate models. He also is strongly involved in studying multiscale modeling and has been a key investigator of the Northwest Consortium for Multiscale Mathematics project.

Lin is also active in the eXtreme Scale Computing Initiative at PNNL, in which he is a co-PI of a extreme-scale computing project focusing on restructuring STOMP, a multiphysics subsurface code, so that it can scale to extreme-scale computing nodes.

Lin holds a Ph.D. from the Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University.  (Posted 7/1/2010)

Chuck Long Appointed to International Radiation Commission Committee

Congratulations to Dr. Charles N. Long, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, on his recent appointment as a member of the International Radiation Commission (IRC) Global Energy Balance (GEB) Committee. The IRC, founded in 1896, is a global network of scientists engaged in atmospheric radiation research and related disciplines.

As the primary driver of the Earth-atmosphere system, the global energy balance is critical in understanding the climate system and climate change. Yet large uncertainties still exist in measuring its different components.

The IRC Global Energy Balance Working Group aims to assess the magnitude and uncertainties of the global energy balance, the decadal changes and underlying causes, as well as their significance for other climate system components and climate change. Another purpose of the working group is to be a forum for discussing to what extent the datasets currently available to the scientific community are adequate for advancing the state of knowledge on the Earth's energy balance.

The appointment of Dr. Long is based upon his outstanding expertise in radiative flux measurements and diagnostics. Long's expertise is widely known for his research on clouds and their effect on the surface radiation energy balance of the Earth-atmosphere system, partly through his extensive association with BSRN, the international World Meteorological Organization Baseline Surface Radiation Network. Specifically, he developed the Radiative Flux Analysis (RFA) methodology, techniques that infer cloud properties using surface radiometer and meteorological measurements. In addition, he specializes in development of surface-based instrumentation and systems for measuring cloud and radiative properties. Dr. Long has been a scientist at PNNL for 10 years.  (Posted 6/1/2010)

Cheryl Cejka appointed to two positions in technology transfer world

Technology Commercialization director Cheryl Cejka has been appointed to two positions in technology transfer world.

In April, Cheryl was elected as one of three new Members-at-Large for the Federal Laboratory Consortium's (FLC's) executive board. The FLC is a nationwide network of federal laboratories that provides a forum for developing strategies and leveraging opportunities to link laboratory innovations with the market. PNNL's Technology Commercialization Office is highly participative in various FLC efforts, including regular submission of PNNL nominations for the coveted annual Excellence in Technology Transfer Awards. To date, the Lab has garnered more of these awards than any other federal lab which, along with Cheryl's new role, helps PNNL and its researchers maintain visibility as leaders in transferring innovative technologies into commercial use.

She also recently was appointed Chair of the Industry-University-Government Interface (IUGI) sector, one of five sectors in the Licensing Executives Society. In this role, she will lead the IUGI sector committee and interested members in providing a forum for education, discussion and networking regarding technology transfer and licensing between industry and universities or government laboratories, among other responsibilities.

Cheryl continues to be a respected technology transfer professional at a national level. Last fiscal year, she served as Executive Chair of the Department of Energy's Technology Transfer Working Group, which provided recommendations on many topics, including priorities for a new DOE Technology Transfer Coordinator. Numerous other appointments and speaking opportunities keep her directly engaged with technology transfer activities across a broad spectrum and help build and maintain PNNL's reputation as a leader in commercializing innovations.  (Posted 6/1/2010)

Dehong Hu Selected Senior Editor for International Journal

Congratulations to Dr. Dehong Hu at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on being chosen as a senior editor for Nano Reviews, a new, international scientific journal. Released in February 2010 by Co-Action Publishing, the publication organizes the deluge of nanoscience, nanotechnology, nanobiotechnology, and single molecule studies, providing researchers with the information they need. The journal is supported by five senior editors and an advisory board.

As a senior editor of a newly launched journal, Hu's priority is to select and invite high-profile scientists to write articles for the journal. In addition, Hu will coordinate peer reviews on submitted manuscripts.

The only representative from a national laboratory, Hu was selected because of his expertise in single-molecule spectroscopy research. Recently, Hu led the installation of two new microscopes at the Department of Energy's EMSL, a national scientific user facility. These microscopes will aid Hu and other scientists in studying interactions and fate of nanomaterials within living cells.  (Posted 5/1/2010)

Wayne Martin named Trustee of the Year

Columbia Basin College trustee Dr. Wayne Martin has been named Trustee of the Year by the state's Trustees Association of Community and Technical Colleges.

Martin has been on the CBC board since 2000. He's also on the WSU Tri-Cities Advisory Council and is a founding member of the Tri-Cities Reading Foundation.

Martin, an environmental research engineer at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, was a driving force in establishing CBC's Office of Diversity, leading to millions of dollars in federal grants for the college and its students.  (Posted 5/1/2010)

Bill Morgan Elected to NCRP Board of Directors

Congratulations to Dr. Bill Morgan on his election to the 2010 Board of Directors of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). NCRP was chartered by Congress in 1964 to support radiation protection by providing independent scientific analysis, information, and recommendations that represent the consensus of leading scientists. The Board of Directors is the NCRP's policy-making body. It consists of the President, the Vice Presidents, and nine other members, all of whom are elected by the voting members. Dr. Morgan is Vice President of NCRP's Program Area Committee-I (PAC-1) that covers basic criteria, epidemiology, radiobiology, and risk.

Dr. Morgan, who is Director of Radiation Biology and Biophysics at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, is a leading researcher in the fields of radiation biology and the long-term biological effects of radiation exposure. He leads PNNL's Low Dose Program, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Morgan is a scientific representative for regulatory agencies such as the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, the International Commission on Radiological Protection, and the Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board Radiation Advisory Committee.  (Posted 4/1/2010)

Mikhail Alnajjar Named to Editorial Board of Safety and Health Journal

Congratulations to Dr. Mikhail Alnajjar at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on being selected for the editorial board of the Journal of Chemical Health and Safety. This bi-monthly journal is designed to provide the latest news on safety and health in the laboratory. As a member of the board, Alnajjar will review manuscripts and, with his background and skills, provide perspectives to the editorial board of the journal. Also, he will be involved in article submission to the journal on an annual basis during his initial 2-year assignment on the board.

Alnajjar was asked to join the board because of his expertise and his passionate efforts to ensure that the tragic laboratory incident that took the life of a person at the University of California, Los Angeles, does not occur at PNNL. Working with scientists and other safety experts, Alnajjar wrote guidelines for managing pyrophoric materials for PNNL, and shortly thereafter, submitted a paper to Elsevier's Journal of Chemical Health and Safety. As the result, he was invited to give a presentation at the American Chemical Society's National meeting in March 2010.

"It was a lively discussion," said Alnajjar. "And, the editor happened to be at the meeting. Shortly thereafter, I was invited to join the board." Alnajjar will add this new role to his already full schedule, including his work as the Chemical Hygiene Officer and the Lead for the Chemical Management System at PNNL, while completing a master's degree in industrial hygiene.  (Posted 4/1/2010)

Ward TeGrotenhuis named co-director of the Microproducts Breakthrough Institute

Ward TeGrotenhuis, Energy & Environment Directorate, has been named co-director of the Microproducts Breakthrough Institute.

The institute, located in Corvallis, Ore., is a joint effort between PNNL and Oregon State University to develop and commercialize microchannel technologies for energy applications. Microchannel technologies are effective for process intensification, increased efficiency and improved control of processes such as those used to make and deposit nanoparticles. The MBI is co-directed by one representative each from PNNL and OSU.

At the institute, researchers from PNNL currently are focused on reducing solar cell manufacturing costs and developing cooling systems powered by waste heat. Eight staff from PNNL work at the MBI.

Ward will continue to be based in Richland. In addition to his co-director responsibilities, he will continue to lead the thermal and reaction systems research team.

More information about the institute is available at Microproducts Breakthrough Institute.  (Posted 2/1/2010)

 

2010 Impact on Scientific Community

Jim Dooley Briefs White House Task Force on Status of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage

Jim Dooley, Senior Staff Scientist at the Joint Global Change Research Institute , was invited to provide his insights at a major public meeting of the White House Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage. The event gave the public the opportunity to provide input on what actions the government should take in the near, mid- and long-term to accelerate the commercial deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage projects to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, Council on Environmental Quality Chair Nancy Sutley, and Deputy Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Bob Perciasepe attended the meeting and delivered remarks.

The Interagency Task Force on Carbon Capture and Storage, co-chaired by the Department of Energy and the Environmental Protection Agency, is developing a plan to overcome the barriers to the widespread, cost-effective deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage within 10 years. The plan is due to President Obama in August 2010. The Task Force is also working on recommendations to bring 5 to 10 commercial demonstration projects online by 2016.

Dooley, an internationally recognized expert on this class of greenhouse gas emissions mitigation technologies, was selected to speak to the Task Force at this public meeting because of his extensive knowledge on carbon dioxide capture and storage and the role of this class of technologies in addressing climate change. Dooley was both a Lead Author and the Cross-Cutting Chairman for Market Deployment for the 2005 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage. He is also the Associate Editor for the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, the first peer-reviewed journal to focus on carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies.

The meeting occurred on May 6, 2010, in Washington, D.C.  (Posted 6/1/2010)

L. Ruby Leung and Jae Edmonds to Serve on NRC Study Committee

Dr. L. Ruby Leung, a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) research scientist, and Dr. Jae Edmonds, chief scientist and Laboratory Fellow at PNNL's Joint Global Change Research Institute — a partnership between PNNL and the University of Maryland-have been selected to serve as members of the National Research Council's "A National Strategy for Advancing Climate Modeling" study committee. The committee is selected by the National Academy of Sciences with oversight by the Board on Atmospheric Sciences and Climate. The study is designed to develop a strategy for improving the nation's capability to accurately simulate climate and related Earth system changes. As two of the 15 committee members, a number of Leung and Edmonds' duties will include:

  • Discuss the status and future of climate modeling over the next decade and beyond.
  • Assist in the development of a strategic approach for identifying the priority observations, research, and decision support activities that would lead to the greatest improvements in the understanding and ability to monitor, model, and respond to climate change.
  • Provide recommendations for developing a comprehensive and integrated national strategy for climate modeling over the next decade and beyond.

Leung is widely considered one of the top few researchers in the United States and the world in regional climate modeling, and is internationally recognized for her research on regional climate change and the hydrological cycle. She led important efforts in defining research priorities and needs in regional climate modeling, and coordinated community efforts to develop capabilities in community models to simulate regional climate. Her research crosses scientific disciplines to advance the state-of-the art in predicting climate change and its regional impacts.

Jae Edmonds Photo

Edmonds is well known for his contributions to the field of integrated assessment of climate change and the examination of interactions between energy, technology, policy, and the environment. He has contributed to numerous assessments including those of the UN-convened Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. During his 35 years in research and teaching, Edmonds has written or co-written hundreds of publications and presentations.

As part of the National Academies, the National Research Council advises the nation on scientific and technical matters. They bring together committees of experts in all areas of science and technology. These experts address critical national issues and give advice to the federal government and the public.  (Posted 12/1/2010)

NAC

John Wacker Selected for National Academies Committee

John Wacker, National Security Directorate, has been selected to serve as a member of the National Academies Committee "Assuring a Future U.S.-based Nuclear Chemistry Expertise" study committee. The committee is selected by the National Academies with oversight by the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technology.

This team will examine supply and demand for nuclear chemistry expertise in the U.S. compared with the production of experts with these skills, and discuss possible approaches for ensuring adequate availability of these skills, including necessary training platforms.

John's insights into the field of nuclear signature analysis and nuclear forensic analysis are highly sought after by government and scientific leaders alike. Nuclear signatures–or chemical and radiological indicators of nuclear processing–are of particular interest to national security officials monitoring nuclear activities and in the emerging area of nuclear forensics. His research has supported the monitoring of radioactive contamination in the environment. He often serves as an advisor in radioanalytical chemistry and nuclear forensics for government agencies.  (Posted 12/1/2010)

Mutation

Bill Morgan and Marianne Sowa Honored by Mutation Research

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Drs. William F. Morgan and Marianne B. Sowa have one of the Top Ten Cited papers in 2007 and 2008 in Mutation Research: Fundamental & Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis. They authored the article "Non-targeted bystander effects induced by ionizing radiation."

They were also recognized for "exceptional contributions to the quality of the Mutation Research series" by Jennifer Whittaker, Executive Publisher, Elsevier, USA. The series consists of three journals on mutagenesis, chromosome breakage, and related subjects.

Marriane Sowa

Morgan, who is Director of Radiation Biology and Biophysics in the Biological Sciences Division, provides scientific leadership at PNNL in the area of effects of low-dose radiation exposure to human health. Both he and Sowa are researchers in the field of radiation biology and the long-term biological effects of radiation exposure.

Reference: Morgan WF and MB Sowa. 2007. "Non-targeted bystander effects induced by ionizing radiation." Mutation Research 616(1-2):159-164.  (Posted 12/1/2010)

NOBUGS

Kleese Van Dam Invited to Talk on Real-Time Analysis at NOBUGS

Parkinson's disease, cancer, and biofuels production are just a few problems Dick Smith has helped untangle in his long career of technological innovation and scientific insight. Now, R&D Magazine has honored Smith, PNNL's Director of Proteomics and Battelle Fellow, as 2010 Scientist of the Year for his many significant contributions to science.

Smith is one of the most-published scientists in the field of proteomics, which seeks to understand biology by the complement of proteins at work within organisms, tissues, or cells. Since the Human Genome Project developed a blueprint of all human genes in human chromosomes earlier in this century, proteomics researchers have pushed to understand how the blueprint creates life.

Over the last 15 years Smith has led the development of measurement platforms that have made proteomics practical.  In the last few years, he has driven efforts that trimmed analytical steps from days and hours to minutes. The increase in speed has opened important new areas for study. Smith led other advances in sensitivity and accuracy that greatly improved clinical researchers' ability to find rare proteins, bringing proteomics technology to their doorstep.

Smith and collaborators applied the technology to liver disease and cancer in the hopes of finding rare markers of disease in blood, making diagnosis or treatment safer and faster. Smith also looked at how bacteria and viruses might cause illnesses, investigated traces in the blood left behind by breast cancer that in the near future may be exploited by doctors, led studies for DOE into possible roles for microbes in making biofuels and examined how large environmental communities of microbes function in our ecosystem and affect our environment.

Much of Smith and his group's cutting-edge technology — including mass spectrometers beefed up with ion funnels, electrospray ionization and other new technologies he has been key in developing — is housed at EMSL, DOE's Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory on the PNNL campus, and a number of the developments have been licensed to private companies.  (Posted 10/1/2010)

Zelenyuk Invited to Speak at National Academies Workshop

Congratulations to Dr. Alla Zelenyuk on being asked to speak at the National Academies workshop titled Challenges in Characterizing Small Particles. This event will focus on the challenges of and possible approaches to understanding particles ranging in diameter from a few nanometers to tens of microns. Large gaps remain in our understanding of these ubiquitous particles, linked to environmental and health issues.

Zelenyuk will be speaking about the challenges of analyzing and imaging particles. She was selected for reputation in developing and applying instruments to study the basic processes that govern nanoparticle chemistry and microphysics. For example, she developed a one-of-a-kind single particle mass spectrometer known as SPLAT II. With this instrument, scientists in the lab and in the field can measure simultaneously the size, chemical composition, shape, and other properties of individual particles. The instrument provides data on particles as small as 50 nanometers in diameter.

The workshop is occurring on October 25-26, 2010, at the Washington Plaza Hotel in Washington, D.C.  (Posted 10/1/2010)

Charles Peden and Janos Szanyi Serve as Guest Editors on Special Issue of Physical Chemistry Journal

Congratulations to Dr. Charles H.F. Peden and Dr. Janos Szanyi at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Institute for Interfacial Catalysis on serving as guest editors for the Festschrift issue of The Journal of Physical Chemistry C. This special issue honors Professor D. Wayne Goodman , Texas A&M University, College Station, TX on the occasion of his 65th birthday.

Dr. Janos Szanyi

As guest editors, Peden and Szanyi along with co-editors Dr. Jose Rodriguez at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Professor Mingshu Chen at Xiamen University solicited, reviewed, and edited 47 scientific papers. These papers were written by Goodman's former students, postdoctoral associates, colleagues, and collaborators. Scientists from the IIC contributed 7 articles.

"Professor Goodman's intellect, rigor, and wit is evidenced throughout his distinguished scientific career. His influence can be seen in much of our work at the IIC," said Peden, Interim Director for the Institute. "I was Wayne's first post-doc and Janos his first Ph.D. student. As such, it has been a special honor for us to work on this special issue."

Peden is best known for his fundamental and applied studies of catalytic automotive exhaust emission control. A Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow and AVS, he has contributed to more than 200 peer-reviewed scientific publications, and leads professional society activities including his recent service as the first Chair of the new Catalysis Science and Technology Division (Probationary) of the American Chemical Society.

Szanyi is recognized for his experimental surface chemistry and catalysis research on metal and metal oxide surfaces. He has extensive experience in kinetic and spectroscopic studies of heterogeneous catalytic processes. His research earned him a 2009 Fulbright Fellowship to conduct studies in his native Hungary on reducing nitrogen oxide emissions from cars and trucks.  (Posted 10/1/2010)

Morris Bullock edited a book on replacing precious metal catalysts with iron, nickel and other earth-abundant metals

Rare and expensive, precious metals such as platinum, rhodium and palladium are used extensively as catalysts on a large scale in preparing pharmaceutical and agricultural chemicals, as well as for applications in energy sciences.  For example, platinum catalysts effectively break the H-H bond of hydrogen in clean, efficient fuel cells. However, the need for platinum limits fuel cells from contributing as effectively to the global energy solution. A new book edited by Dr. Morris Bullock of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory summarizes the progress and challenges of designing catalysts from less expensive, more abundant metals.

Catalysis Without Precious Metals

The handbook, Catalysis without Precious Metals, is written for chemists in industry and academia. The 306-page hardcover book summarizes recent progress in the field, pointing to how new catalysts may ultimately supplant precious metals in some types of reactions. Also, the book goes on to highlight the remaining chemical challenges and areas in need of further study. The book was written by experts from the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and China.

Bullock was asked to edit because of his expertise in homogeneous catalysis, which has both the feedstock and catalyst in the same phase. Bullock's research focuses on reactivity of metal hydrides, including the transfer of protons, hydrides, and hydrogen atoms. He has also made substantial contributions to developing molecular catalysts that create and use hydrogen as fuel. Bullock currently serves as the Director of the multi-million dollar Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis.

Bullock RM (editor). 2010. Catalysis Without Precious Metals. Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, Germany. ISBN: 3527323546. Order copies from Amazon.com, Barnes and Noble , or other book retailers.  (Posted 10/1/2010)

Koppenaal Co-Editor-in-Chief of New Edition of Spectrometry/Spectroscopy Encyclopedia

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Dr. David Koppenaal is co-editor-in-chief of the second edition of the Encyclopedia of Spectrometry and Spectroscopy. He and 17 other PNNL scientists also authored several chapters. They are Doug Duckworth, Greg Eiden, Jean Futrell, Kim Hixson, Ryan Kelly, Julia Laskin, Daniel Lopez-Ferrer, Ioan Marginean, Tom Metz, Kevin Minard, Jason Page, Ljiljana Pasa-Tolic, Errol (Robbie) Robinson, Alex Shvartsburg, Anil Shukla, Keqi Tang, and John Wacker.

The three-volume, 3312-page set is published by Elsevier and covers theory, methods, and applications of these key scientific areas for researchers, students, and professionals. The encyclopedia combines proven techniques and new insights for comprehensive coverage of the field.

Koppenaal is a PNNL Laboratory Fellow who leads the Biological Separations and Mass Spectrometry Group within the Biological Sciences Division and is Chief Technology Officer for EMSL, a Department of Energy user facility located at PNNL. He currently is chair of the Analytical Chemistry Division of the American Chemical Society, is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Royal Society of Chemistry, and is a member of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry.

Spectroscopy is the use of light, sound or particle emission to study matter. Spectrometry is the spectroscopic technique used to assess the concentration or amount of a given chemical species. Spectroscopy and spectrometry are often used in physical and analytical chemistry to identify substances through the spectrum emitted from or absorbed by them. EMSL and PNNL house state-of-the-art capabilities in these important analytical areas  (Posted 9/1/2010)

International Climate Change Assessment Gains Five PNNL Scientists

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) named five Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) scientists to play significant roles on its next report. The IPCC is a group of experts tasked with evaluating the science, underlying climate change, its impacts, and potential responses. The scientists will join 831 researchers on the three working groups.

Working Group I, "The Physical Science Basis":

Phil Rasch, lead author. An American Association for the Advancement of Science Fellow and Laboratory Fellow at PNNL, Rasch is internationally recognized for his contribution to climate modeling and connecting cloud formation, atmospheric chemistry, and climate. Rasch is a consistent contributor to IPCC reports.

Working Group II, "Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability":

Tony Janetos, coordinating lead author. Janetos is a Laboratory Fellow at PNNL and Director of the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI), a partnership between PNNL and the University of Maryland. Janetos is frequently called upon to give testimony to Congress and participate in other policy forums to provide scientific insight and perspectives on climate change and its impacts to a wide range of audiences. He has contributed to chapters in each of the previous IPCC reports, and the special report on Land Use, Land Use Change, and Forestry.

Richard Moss, review editor. Moss, a Senior Staff Scientist at JGCRI, has been with PNNL since 1993. During a business leave of absence from 2006-2009, he served as Vice President and Managing Director for Climate Change at the World Wildlife Fund and Senior Director of the U.N. Foundation Energy and Climate Program. He has been a lead author and general editor of a number of IPCC Assessments, Special Reports, and Technical Papers, and remains active in the IPCC, co-chairing its Task Group on Data and Scenario Support.

Working Group III, "Mitigation of Climate Change":

Jae Edmonds, lead author. Edmonds is a PNNL Laboratory Fellow and Senior Staff Scientist and Technical Leader of Economic Programs at JGCRI. Edmonds is internationally known for his contributions to the field of integrated assessment of climate change and the examination of interactions between energy, technology, policy, and the environment. He served as lead author on 14 IPCC chapters and reports.

Leon Clarke, coordinating lead author. Clarke is a Senior Research Economist at JGCRI; his current research focuses on the role of technology in addressing climate change, scenario analysis, and integrated assessment model development. He contributed to two previous IPCC reports.

Their selection to serve in integral roles in the next IPCC assessment highlights their worldwide leadership in the climate science community. The IPCC was established by the United Nations and the World Meteorological Organization to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date assessment of the current state of knowledge on climate change. The IPCC Climate Change Assessment Report is scheduled to be released in sections in 2013 and 2014.  (Posted 8/1/2010)

Satish Nune and Praveen Thallapally Research featured on cover of Chemical Communications

Materials research conducted by PNNL's Satish Nune and Praveen Thallapally served as the cover article for the printed edition of Chemical Communications in June. The research demonstrates synthesis of hexagonally shaped nanoparticles, which could have applications in the optics and magnetic industries. Also, the sorption properties of the material and its selectivity offer potential for carbon dioxide capture and various industrial applications.

Other PNNL staff who contributed to the research were Alice Dohnalkova, Chongmin Wang, Jun Liu, and Gregory Exarhos.  (Posted 7/1/2010)

Evangelina Shreeve named to National Science Foundation National Girls Collaborative Project

Evangelina Shreeve, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Science and Engineering Education Manager, has been named to the National Science Foundation's National Girls Collaborative Project. This project brings together organizations from around the nation to encourage girls to pursue careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

PNNL is nationally recognized as a leader in STEM education and is also active in the local MESA (Mathematics, Engineering, and Science Achievement) Program and sponsors a Young Women in Science Program.

Shreeve brings over eighteen years of leadership in diversity and higher education to the NGCP Board. From 2001-2007, Shreeve served as the Vice-President for Diversity and Grants Administration for Columbia Basin College. Prior to joining PNNL in 2008, Shreeve was the Director of Community Partnerships for the University of Washington where she was the primary liaison for the UW Yakima Valley Community Partnership office and Educational Outreach Program.  (Posted 6/1/2010)

Research featured on cover of Dalton Transactions

A new class of catalytic material has been studied by lead researcher Praveen Thallapally along with fellow Energy and Environment Directorate scientists Carlos Fernandez, Radha Motkuri and Satish Nune. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) display a unique three-dimensional structure that is highly selective and reactive, with performance that is up to 50 percent better than commercial materials in the tested reactions. The catalyst's high shape selectivity points to energy, environmental, and other applications for this new class of materials. This breakthrough research was featured as the cover of Dalton Transactions in February 2010. Additional staff at PNNL involved in the research were Jun Liu and Chuck Peden.  (Posted 6/1/2010)

Carolyn Pearce Writes Chapter on Microbial Production of Metalloid Nanoparticles

Carolyn Pearce, Fundamental and Computational Directorate, on contributing to a chapter in a new book, Microbial Metal and Metalloid Metabolism: Advances and Applications. The study of microbe-metal interactions has led to innovations and discoveries, such as development of microbial fuel cells, pili that function as "nanowires," and new, enhanced approaches to bioremediation.

Scheduled for release in June, the American Society for Microbiology publication reviews the current state of research in the field, as well as emerging developments and applications, and forecasts future research directions.

One of five authors, Carolyn lent her expertise in microbial synthesis of nanominerals to the writing of "Nanoparticles Formed From Microbial Oxyanion Reduction of Toxic Group 15 and Group 16 Metalloids." Written as a review chapter providing background information, the chapter also includes snapshots of current research in this up and coming area. Read the full article.  (Posted 6/1/2010)

XSCI Invited to Give Presentations at IPDPS Conference

Representatives from the eXtreme Scale Computing Initiative (XSCI) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory were invited to give a Global Arrays presentation at the prestigious 2011 IEEE International Parallel & Distributed Processing Symposium (IPDPS) in Anchorage, Alaska in May. In addition to the invitation to present a Global Arrays tutorial and host a full-day workshop to discuss the readiness for exascale computing of data-centric programming models, five XSCI Principal Investigators were invited to speak about their research for the Initiative: Daniel Chavarria, Darren Kerbyson, Manoj Krishnan, Bruce Palmer, and Abhinav Vishnu. XSCI's mission is to develop methods, algorithms, and software that can be efficiently used on the next generation of supercomputers with a 1,000-fold increase in computational power compared to what is available today. High-performance computing is working to solve problems our society is facing in areas such as energy, the environment, and national security.

IPDPS is an international forum for engineers and scientists from around the world to present their latest research findings in all aspects of parallel computation. IPDPS represents a unique international gathering of computer scientists from around the world.  (Posted 5/1/2010)

Steven Smith Served Key Role in National Academies Workshop on Climate Change Mitigation

Congratulations to Dr. Steven Smith of the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) on the success of the National Academy of Sciences. Modeling the Economics of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Workshop. As a member of the event's planning committee, Smith and his colleagues focused the 2-day workshop on the economics of carbon offsets, bottom-up supply curves, technological learning curves, and long-term scenarios. Around these topics, the committee brought together leading researchers, including Dr. Jae Edmonds also from JGCRI. The workshop was attended by members of the policy and modeling communities.

Smith chaired the panel session titled "Storylines, Scenarios, and the Limits of Long-Term Socio-Techno-Economic Forecasting." This panel was designed to start discussions on creating and using new socio-economic scenarios, which are the starting point for analyzing mitigation costs. Dr. Richard Moss, also from JGCRI, spoke at this session, discussing the new community-based process for developing and using future scenarios for emissions and climate change.

Held April 15-16, 2010, at the National Academies of Sciences Headquarters in Washington, DC, this workshop was requested by the Department of Energy to better understand the models used to estimate the economic impacts of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This is the second National Academies of Sciences workshop DOE has requested on this topic.  (Posted 5/1/2010)

Marianne Sowa Serves as Guest Editor for Special Issue of Mutation Research

Congratulations to Dr. Marianne Sowa, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, for serving as Guest Editor for the May 10 issue of Mutation Research: Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis. The issue theme is "NOTE: Towards a New Paradigm for Evaluating the Effects of Exposure to Ionizing Radiation."

This special issue of Mutation Research contains several papers that were presented at the NOTE annual meeting in Galway, Ireland, as well as other complementary contributions. The NOTE project is a European Union-funded integrated research effort designed to address non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation and to consider the implications of these effects on radiation protection. The journal features research that addresses cell signaling, epigenetic effects and the role of the tissue microenvironment in radiation-induced responses. As Guest Editor, Dr. Sowa solicited manuscripts, oversaw the peer-review process and worked with the journal staff to finalize all submissions.

Dr. Sowa was chosen to serve as Guest Editor on the basis of her expertise in the effects of ionizing radiation on cells and complex tissue models. She is currently working to understand the role of radiation induced signaling in matrix remodeling in a human skin tissue model. Dr. Sowa has a joint appointment as an adjunct full professor at the University of Maryland's School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Baltimore, and is currently course coordinator for Radiation Biology at Washington State University-Tri-Cities. Her work is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Dose Radiation Research Program and NASA's Ground Based Biology Program.  (Posted 4/1/2010)

Article on Molecular Simulation of Water Named Highly Innovative by Journal

Congratulations to Dr. Soohaeng Yoo and Dr. Sotiris Xantheas at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Professor Xiao Cheng Zeng at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln on having their article on water properties chosen as of one of the top chemical physics papers in 2009. The article was selected by the editors of the Journal of Chemical Physics. Each year, the editors select a few notable articles published in the journal that year that present ground-breaking research.

The article demonstrates a key problem in two of the most popular DFT or density functional theory models in predicting the correct phase diagram of water. The DFT models describe the underlying interactions between water at the molecular level, incorporating the interactions between the nuclei and the electrons of the system. Both of those DFT models suggest that the melting temperature of ice is too high, almost 150°F higher than the value that nature has settled on.

"So if you use those models to describe water at room temperature, you do not get the regular liquid but instead a supercooled glassy state that does not look like nature's most ubiquitous solvent," said Dr. Sotiris Xantheas, the principal author on the paper. This finding will help researchers fine tune DFT models to achieve a closer match to what's observed during experiments.

This seminal article is freely available online until the end of August 2010.

Reference: Yoo S, XC Zeng, and SS Xantheas. 2009. "On the phase diagram of water with density functional theory potentials: The melting temperature of ice Ih with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof and Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functionals." Journal of Chemical Physics 130:221102.  (Posted 3/1/2010)

Jim Dooley Edits Special Issue of the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

Congratulations to Dr. James Dooley at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on the publication of the Special Issue of the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control: The Ninth International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies. Dooley served as the Managing Guest Editor for this special issue. He worked together with Associate Editors Sally Benson (Stanford University), Anhar Karimjee (US Environmental Protection Agency) and Ed Rubin (Carnegie Mellon University) during the 12-month process. Together, the team selected, arranged peer reviews, and edited the articles. The issue was published on March 3, 2010.

The Special Issue includes 34 invited papers which were originally presented at the 9th International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Control Technologies, held in Washington, D.C. in November 2008. The papers covered all aspects of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), including detailed analyses of fully integrated CCS systems and descriptions of lab-based advancements relating to individual process steps. The special issue captures important new hard-won and invaluable field testing data about how CCS systems work in practice. Other papers in the Special Issue address a wide range of economic, public policy and environmental aspects of future large scale CCS deployment.

"The body of knowledge that is summarized in this Special Issue represents a profoundly more mature and nuanced understanding of the technological readiness of CCS technologies and their ability to make significant contributions to addressing climate change. The scientific and technological progress represented by these papers is something that all members of the CCS community can take pride in," said Dooley.

The International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control is the first peer-reviewed journal to focus on CCS technologies. The journal covers developments in greenhouse gas control in the power sectors and in the major manufacturing and production industries. It aims to cover all greenhouse gas emissions and the range of abatement options available, and comprises both technical and non-technical related literature in one volume. Dooley is the Associate Editor of the International Journal of Green House Gas Control.

Dooley is an internationally recognized expert known for his cutting-edge research on CCS and the role of this class of technologies in addressing climate change for PNNL's Joint Global Change Research Institute and Global Energy Technology Strategy projects. He was also a lead author and the Cross-Cutting Chairman for Market Deployment for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage (2005).  (Posted 3/1/2010)

Carol Kessler

Carol Kessler Selected for National Academy Committee

Carol Kessler, Director of PNNL's Center for Global Security, has been selected to participate on a National Academy Committee on Homeland Security and Export Controls. The first meeting was held March 2-3, 2010. The committee will be reviewing suggestions from several studies on modernizing U.S. export controls from the standpoint of the Department of Homeland Security.  (Posted 3/1/2010)

Liem Dang Named Adjunct Professor at Australian University

Congratulations to Dr. Liem Dang at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on being named an adjunct faculty member of the School of Chemical Engineering at the University of Queensland, Australia. In this role, Dang will work with students who are inventing, designing, and managing products and processes that transform raw materials into valuable products via biology, chemistry, and physics.

Dang was selected because of his expertise in designing and implement simulations to study molecular properties and processes at aqueous interfaces. His research, including numerous publications focused on the transport of ions and molecules between interfaces of hydrogen-bonded liquids. Of particular interest is his research at interfaces of water with vapor, other liquids, and solids.  (Posted 1/1/2010)

Frank Greitzer Authors Book Chapter on Combat Identification

Frank Greitzer, Knowledge Systems group, authored a book chapter titled "Training Strategies to Mitigate Expectancy-Induced Response Bias in Combat Identification: A Research Agenda" in Human Factor Issues in Combat Identification, which was published in January 2010.  (Posted 1/1/2010)

Jian Ma Co-authors New Book

Jian Ma, Energy & Environment Directorate, co-authors a new book, Emerging Techniques in Power System Analysis. The book presents emerging techniques including data mining, grid computing, probabilistic methods, phasor measurement unit and how to apply these techniques to solving new challenges facing the power industry following the deregulation. The book is intended for engineers and managers in the power industry, as well as researchers and graduate students in power engineering. The book will be published by Springer in February, and is available on Amazon.com. More Info  (Posted 1/1/2010)

 

2009 Awards

CIO

Jerry Johnson Named One of Top 50 Government CIOs

Jerry Johnson, PNNL Chief Information Officer (CIO), was named one of the Top 50 Government CIOs by Information Week. This is Information Week's first-ever compilation of top CIOs in federal, state and local government.

This is not a recognition that was applied for or for which there was a formal nomination process. Rather it's based on the feedback from the network of government CIO peers that Jerry routinely interacts with. Jerry is the only CIO from a DOE national lab among the Top 50.  (Posted 9/1/2009)

office

Beat Schmid Receives Dual Honor from DOE Office of Science

Beat Schmid recently was honored with two awards by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science. These two awards recognize Beat's leadership contributions to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, a DOE multi-laboratory, interagency program for global climate change research. The awards honored Beat's three-year terms as a member of the ARM Climate Research Facility Science Board and as leader of the ARM Program's Aerosol Working Group.

Dr. Beat Schmid, foreground, points out a feature on a research aircraft used in ARM field campaigns
Dr. Beat Schmid, foreground, points out a feature on a research aircraft used in ARM field

The Science Board is composed of highly respected ARM-supported scientists and the external climate research community. During his term, Schmid reviewed large user facility proposals and made funding recommendations. Dr. Wanda Ferrell, Program Director of the ARM Climate Research Facility, included these words on the plaque: "Your contribution has established a solid foundation for ensuring that the best quality science is conducted at the ACRF."

The Aerosol Working Group comprises national and international climate experts whose research is quantifying the impact of aerosols on clouds that affect the Earth's climate system. Dr. Patricia M. Dehmer, Acting Associate Director of DOE's Office of Science, included these words on the award: "Because of your dynamic leadership, the Working Group has made a significant scientific contribution to the ARM program's aerosol science and climate community at large." Beat received the Working Group award at the annual ARM Science Team Meeting in April.  (Posted 4/1/2009)

geosciences

Kevin Rosso Received Best Paper Award at Geosciences Symposium

Kevin Rosso received the Best Paper from a National Laboratory Award at the 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Basic Energy Sciences Geosciences Symposium. The symposium brought together 50+ U.S. experts in geosciences and related fields to discuss ongoing and future research. Every year, the symposium's committee of observers awards two best paper awards: one to a national laboratory researcher and one to a university researcher.

The award-winning paper Rosso presented was on redox transformations of the iron oxide hematite. Rosso showed that under certain conditions interfacial electron transfer can couple to bulk conduction of electrons yielding transformation to unique crystal morphologies. These results with iron oxide are relevant to water quality, corrosion science, soil evolution, and environmental cleanup.

Rosso is active in the scientific community, having authored or co-authored 90+ peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters. He is a frequent speaker at universities and international symposia. In addition, he is a life fellow of the Mineralogical Society of America and a member of the Geochemical Society and the American Chemical Society. The symposium was held March 12-13, 2009, in Annapolis, Maryland.  (Posted 3/1/2009)

Donna Magruder and Casey O'Leary Receive DOE Secretarial Honor Award From Secretary Bodman

Donna Magruder
Casey O'Leary
Donna Magruder and Casey O'Leary were recognized by Secretary Bodman during the Department of Energy Secretarial Honor Awards ceremony in Washington, D.C., Nov. 5.

They were honored for their extraordinary achievement in identifying and neutralizing cyber threats to the DOE. The ceremony recognizes a number of department employees for their outstanding leadership, accomplishments, commitment to excellence and contributions benefiting the organization and our nation.  (Posted 1/1/2009)

Tom Cook and Team Awarded the CIA Directorate of Science & Technology's 2008 John A. McCone Award

Tom Cook and a team of others were awarded the CIA Directorate of Science & Technology's 2008 John A. McCone Award. The award honors agency employees who bring science and technology to bear on the nation's most challenging intelligence problems. It is presented to teams or individuals whose dedication and accomplishments exemplify the tradition of the Directorate of Science and Technology – deep technical expertise, disciplined program management, and responsiveness to mission. The award acknowledges the importance of teamwork, creativity, innovation, initiative, risk-taking, persistence and determination.  (Posted 1/1/2009)

leadership

Robbie Tidwell Earns Special Leadership Acknowledgment

Robbie Tidwell earned special leadership acknowledgment from the Eastern Washington Chapter of the Academy of Certified Hazardous Materials for serving a second term as president.  (Posted 12/1/2009)

PNNL team wins award from Eastern Washington Chapter of the Academy of Certified Hazardous Materials Management

The Eastern Washington Chapter of the Academy of Certified Hazardous Materials Management recognized PNNL's Mike Truex, Vince Vermuel, Mart Oostrom, Rob Mackley, Donny Mendoza, and Brad Fritz with the 2009 award for Hazardous Material Identification and Control Research for their development of Iron Particle Catalysis to Dechlorinate TCE at Ft. Lewis, WA.

The team worked with industrial partners to develop a method to inject 2-micron-diameter iron particles into an aquifer at Fort Lewis, Washington, contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE). When the test zone temperature was increased, using electrical resistance heating (also previously developed by PNNL), TCE dechlorination dramatically increased. The TCE was destroyed quickly enough to prevent vapor-phase TCE from escaping before being treated. The combined heating and chemical reaction treatment technique is expected to cost less than other approaches to contaminant source remediation.  (Posted 12/1/2009)

ANS

Michaele (Mikey) Brady Raap Recognized

Michaele (Mikey) Brady Raap, a Chief Engineer in Nuclear Materials & Engineering Analysis, was recognized by the American Nuclear Society (ANS) for "Distinguished Service to the American nuclear Society Nuclear and Criticality Safety Division in governance and international work." Mikey has served as the NCSD Vice Chair and Chair. She is a long-time member of the Education Committee and was a contributor to the development of the white paper process. Mikey has led international NCS technology studies and serves in the development of ANS and ISO NCS standards. She has served on the Program Committee of several ICNC meetings and recently as the General Chairman of the 2009 NCSD topical meeting.  (Posted 12/1/2009)

Mike Truex, Vince Vermuel, Mart Oostrom, Rob Mackley, Donny Mendoza, and Brad Fritz win award from Eastern Washington Chapter of the Academy of Certified Hazardous Materials

Mike Truex, Vince Vermuel, Mart Oostrom, Rob Mackley, Donny Mendoza, and Brad Fritz received the 2009 award for Hazardous Material Identification and Control Research for development of Iron Particle Catalysis to Dechlorinate TCE at Ft. Lewis, WA.

The PNNL team worked with industrial partners to develop a method to inject 2-micron-diameter iron particles into an aquifer at Fort Lewis, Washington contaminated with trichloroethene (TCE). When the test zone temperature was increased, using electrical resistance heating (also previously developed by PNNL), TCE dechlorination dramatically increased. The TCE was destroyed quickly enough to prevent vapor-phase TCE from escaping before being treated. The combined heating and chemical reaction treatment technique is expected to cost less than other approaches to contaminant source remediation.  (Posted 12/1/2009)

chemistry

Richard Smith Selected for Analytical Chemistry Award

Congratulations to Dr. Richard D. Smith at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on being chosen for the 2010 Eastern Analytical Symposium, Inc., award for "Excellence in the Fields of Analytical Chemistry. "Smith was selected for developing and applying high-resolution separations and mass spectrometry methods and instruments to the analysis of complex biological samples.

A Battelle Fellow, Smith is an internationally recognized scientist. His work spans a wide array of applications. For example, his group is uncovering how microbial communities inside termites turn wood into useful chemicals, serving as a possible basis for developing new fuel sources. Other efforts are related to health, such as discovering functions of salmonella, hepatitis C, and influenza.

Smith has written or co-written more than 750 publications and book chapters. His research has garnered 36 U.S. patents and 32 foreign patents since he joined PNNL in 1976. He has received numerous honors including eight R&D 100 Awards, the 2003 American Chemical Society Award for Analytical Chemistry, and the 2009 Human Proteome Organization Discovery Award for Proteomics Sciences.  (Posted 11/1/2009)

HUPO

Dick Smith Receives HUPO Award for Advancements in Proteomics Technologies

Congratulations to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Dr. Richard D. Smith, who received the 2009 Human Proteome Organisation (HUPO) Discovery Award for Proteomic Sciences. The award is for a single discovery in the field and consists of a plaque and $3000. Smith was honored at the HUPO 8th Annual World Congress September 26-30 in Toronto, where he presented a major lecture on some of the proteomics developments that earned him this recognition.

HUPO is an international scientific organization representing and promoting proteomics through international cooperation and collaborations. Smith is a member of the HUPO Board of Directors.

Smith, a Battelle Fellow and Chief Scientist and Director of Proteomics at PNNL, is the author or coauthor of more than 700 peer-reviewed publications, holds 33 patents and has received eight R&D 100 Awards. He is also the Director of the NIH Research Resource Center for Integrative Proteomics within the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a U.S. Department of Energy national scientific user facility located at PNNL.

See the PNNL news release.  (Posted 10/1/2009)

Nerken

Don Baer wins prestigious AVS Nerken Award

Don Baer, Lead Scientist for Interfacial Chemistry at the Department of Energy's EMSL, has received the 2009 Albert Nerken Award from the AVS.

The award recognizes individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the solution of technological problems in areas of interest to AVS. Baer was cited "for seminal contributions towards advancing the application of surface-sensitive techniques to understand environmentally important materials and interfacial processes."

Baer largely attributes the award to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's rich history of multidisciplinary, team-oriented research that enables significant progress on complex problems. "Although the award is presented to an individual, much of my research has involved participating on and leading teams," he says. "These teams have made important advances in understanding stress corrosion cracking, oxide and mineral surface chemistry, and dynamic behaviors of nanoparticles, as well as in developing and applying interfacial tools in EMSL that facilitate such advances."

The award was established in 1984 by Veeco Instruments, Inc., in recognition of Albert Nerken for his role as a founding member of AVS, his early work in the area of high vacuum and leak detection, and his contributions to the commercial development of that instrumentation. Presentation of the award takes place at the AVS International Symposium, which this year is in San Jose, California, in November.

Baer is a Laboratory Fellow at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, on whose campus EMSL resides, and a Fellow of AVS. He also is an adjunct professor of physics at Washington State University, Tri-Cities, and an adjunct professor of chemistry at the University of Washington. Baer graduated from Carnegie Mellon University and received his doctorate from Cornell University. He has authored or co-authored more than 200 peer-reviewed scientific journal publications and edited three books and four special journal issues. He is also Reviews Editor for Surface and Interface Analysis, a refereed journal devoted to publishing papers and applying techniques for characterizing surfaces, interfaces, and thin films.  (Posted 6/1/2009)

friend

Mark Morgan Receives Supporting Friend of IEEE Member and Geographic Activities Award

Mark Morgan, Energy & Environment Directorate, received the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) 2009 "Supporting Friend of IEEE Member and Geographic Activities Award" from Leonard Bond, director of IEEE Region 6 (Western USA), during a senior management meeting May 28.

IEEE is the world's largest technical society with nearly 400,000 members worldwide, including areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power and consumer electronics among others. Mark has been consistently supporting the activities of the IEEE local Section and the Power & Energy Chapter and encouraging his staff to participate and play leadership roles in the technical society.  (Posted 6/1/2009)

society

Terence Critchlow Inducted Into World's Largest Computing Society

Terence Critchlow has been elected a Senior Member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). ACM, the world's largest educational and scientific computing society with about 92,000 members, delivers resources that advance computing as a science and a profession. ACM provides the computing field's premier digital library and serves its members and the computing profession with leading-edge publications, conferences, and career resources.

Terence, Associate Director of Scientific Data Management, is one of 395 members inducted into the ACM Senior Member program this year. The program, initiated in 2006, includes members with at least 10 years of professional experience who have demonstrated performance that sets them apart from their peers through technical leadership, and technical or professional contributions. ACM Senior Member status recognizes the top 25 percent of ACM Professional Members for their demonstrated excellence in the computing field. ACM's Senior Members join a distinguished list of colleagues to whom ACM and its members look for guidance and leadership in computing and information technology.  (Posted 5/1/2009)

Scott Stephens Recognized by CCHPS as Radiation Safety Technologist of the Year

Scott Stephens, Operational Systems Directorate, has been recognized by the Columbia Chapter Health Physics Society (CCHPS) as the Radiation Safety Technologist of the Year. The CCHPS is a professional organization whose members are specialists in radiation safety and are dedicated to maximizing the beneficial use of radiation while minimizing the risk to people and the environment.

Scott has been at the Lab for the last ten years as a senior radiation protection technician (RPT) in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL). He has had the opportunity to interface with several top research scientists in the nation and has developed an excellent working relationship with the RPL staff members. One of Scott's colleagues stated, "Scott is an outstanding RPT and staff member at the Lab. He is consistently recognized by our research customers for his outstanding support, skill, attitude and personal caring."  (Posted 5/1/2009)

young

Henry Huang Receives IEEE Power & Energy Society Outstanding Young Engineer Award

Henry Huang will receive the 2009 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Power & Energy Society (PES) Outstanding Young Engineer Award. The award recognizes engineers 35 years of age or under "for outstanding contributions in the leadership of technical society activities including local and/or transnational PES and other technical societies, leadership in community and humanitarian activities and evidence of technical competence through significant engineering achievements."

As a recipient, Henry will designate a college or university to receive a $2,000 electrical engineering scholarship from the society. He is scheduled to accept this award at the awards luncheon July 28 at the IEEE PES General Meeting in Calgary, Alberta. The IEEE is the world's leading professional association for the advancement of technology, with more than 375,000 members in more than 160 countries.  (Posted 4/1/2009)

Heather Colburn and Jon Schwantes Selected to Attend IUPAC Meeting as 2009 Young Observers

Heather Colburn
Jon Schwantes

Heather Colburn and Jon Schwantes were selected as 2009 Young Observers to attend the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry General Assembly and Congress Meeting.

The U.S. National Committee (USNC) sends U.S. Observers under the age of 45 from industry, academia, and national laboratories to the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) World Chemistry Congress and General Assembly, held every two years. The IUPAC will hold its 45th General Assembly and 42nd Congress in Glasgow, Scotland in August 2009. Established by the U.S. National Committee (USNC) for IUPAC in 1977 to foster interactions with internationally acclaimed scientists in various fields, the Young Observer Programs strives to introduce the work of IUPAC to a new generation of distinguished researchers and to provide the opportunity to address international scientific policy issues.  (Posted 2/1/2009)

career

Siva Pilli Selected for ASME Early Career Leadership Internship

Siva Pilli, Energy & Environment Directorate, was selected for ASME's Early Career Leadership Intern Program to Serve Engineering (ECLIPSE). Siva has been an ASME member since 2007 and currently serves as peer reviewer for ASME journals. The goal of ECLIPSE is to engage, identify, and begin developing potential leaders for ASME by placing early career engineers in highly visible and productive roles within the ASME organization.  (Posted 2/1/2009)

walleigh

Evelyn Hirt receives IEEE 2008 Robert S. Walleigh Engineering Professionalism Award

Evelyn Hirt recently was selected by the IEEE-USA board of directors as a 2008 recipient of the Robert S. Walleigh Engineering Professionalism Award for enthusiastic leadership and contributions in a wide range of IEEE-USA professional activities. IEEE is the world's leading professional association dedicated to technological innovation and excellence the benefit of humanity.  (Posted 1/1/2009)

SERCh

Former PNNL Interns Receive Honors for Research

On November 8-9, 100 student researchers convened in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to present their research in poster form during the annual DOE Science and Energy Research Challenge (SERCh) Poster Competition. SERCh showcases the research projects of DOE-funded undergraduate students and interns at national laboratories. Kirsten Meyer and Mike Larche, former PNNL interns, received top honors for their scientific research.

Kristen Meyer, a WSU Tri-Cities science major, worked in the Bioproducts, Sciences, and Engineering Laboratory (BSEL) on the WSU Tri-Cities campus. DOE's Office of Biomass Program funded Kristen's research under the guidance of molecular biologist Kenneth Bruno in PNNL's Fungal Biotechnology group. She placed first in the life sciences division and earned a $3,000 scholarship.

During her internship, Kristen dove into the genetics of a black mold commonly found in soil, Aspergillus niger—a filamentous, or fuzzy, fungus. Her efforts greatly improved the efficiency and speed of lab processes. She worked with Ken to advance how researchers delete genes from A. niger. The work could provide a way to use mold to make plastics and other chemicals from broken-down plant matter, called biomass. With Kristen's help, this method dramatically sped up the whole process for A. niger. "Instead of being able to delete target genes just 18 percent of the time, the new method does it 95 percent of the time, "Ken said. Now PNNL researchers only need about a week to identify genes, enabling them to study several groups of genes at once.

Mike Larche placed third in the energy division, earning a $1,000 scholarship. Mike studies physics at Eastern Washington University. This past summer he supported the Reactor Aging Management LDRD project. This project is attempting to develop new diagnostic and prognostic methods to permit life extension of the U.S. nuclear reactor fleet. The project involves development of sensing methods (eddy current, acoustic microscopy, magnetic sensing), which will detect fatigue-induced flaws in reactor components (piping, pumps, pressure vessels, etc.). Flaw data will be used to develop prognostic models to estimate the remaining lifetime of the components.

Mike worked on the "magnetic Barkhausen noise" task. In this method, steel samples are immersed in a strong magnetic field to "listen" for movement in the material. The movement is caused when tiny magnetic domains (microscopic magnets) attempt to orient themselves within the imposed field. If the steel sample is damaged due to fatigue, the magnetic domains have a harder time orienting themselves with the imposed field.  (Posted 11/1/2009)

noaa

Kerri Pratt Awarded NOAA Fellowship

Congratulations to Dr. Kerri A. Pratt on her selection for a postdoctoral fellowship in climate and global change from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Pratt was one of ten researchers that NOAA chose in 2009 as part of its national program to create and train the next generation of climate research leaders. Pratt decided to spend her two-year fellowship, which began in October 2009, at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Pratt relishes the opportunity to work with Dr. Dan Cziczo, who leads measurement and instrument research for PNNL's Aerosol Climate Initiative and with PNNL climate physics scientist Dr. Jennifer Comstock. Pratt already had been familiar with Cziczo because of their related research in cloud-ice formation, a little understood yet important aspect in predicting global climate change. "When I was awarded the fellowship, I knew I couldn't find a better place in the United States than PNNL for this field of research," she said.

Pratt is part of a PNNL group that will travel to Colorado this winter to study cloud ice formation at the Storm Peak Laboratory. Accustomed to flying through the clouds with measurement instruments, Pratt says, "In Colorado we'll let the clouds come to us on the mountain top." Pratt and PNNL postdoctoral researcher Dr. Gourihar Kulkarni will study ice formation using an environmental chamber, as well as particle analysis by laser mass spectrometry (PALMS) to measure ice residue chemistry. Pratt will then work with Comstock to model the clouds observed in Colorado.

Pratt received her B.S. in chemistry at Pennsylvania State University and a Ph.D. in chemistry at University of California, San Diego. While Pratt was finishing her doctoral degree at UCSD, PNNL established an Aerosol Chemistry and Climate Institute with the university. Pratt is a past recipient of the National Science Foundation graduate research fellowship and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's STAR graduate fellowship.  (Posted 11/1/2009)

PNNL Researchers Honored by Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum

Robert Dahowski
Robert Dahowski
James Dooley
Jim Dooley
Casie Davidson
Casie Davidson

Congratulations to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Robert Dahowski, Jim Dooley, and Casie Davidson, with their Chinese and U.S. collaborators, for receiving a recognition award from the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum. The team recently completed an intensive five-year research project that revealed that China has enough geologic storage capacity to capture and store carbon dioxide from industrial sources for at least a century.

The Forum is a Ministerial–level international climate change initiative focused on the development of carbon capture and sequestration technologies. The Forum presented the award during its 3rd Ministerial Meeting in London in October 2009. The award went to the research team comprising Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Rock and Soil Mechanics, and Leonardo Technologies, Inc.  (Posted 10/1/2009)

Carbon capture shows major potential in China

Unprecedented study identifies 100 years of carbon storage reservoirs

An international carbon sequestration organization recognized a team of PNNL scientists for their unprecedented research to identify and quantify China's potential capacity for capturing and storing carbon dioxide and to determine its potential viability and cost effectiveness for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

On Oct. 13, Norwegian Minister of Petroleum and Energy Terie Riis-Johnansen presented a Recognition Award to Bob Dahowski, Energy & Environment Directorate, at the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum's 3rd Ministerial Meeting held in London. Bob accepted the award on behalf of his colleagues, Casie Davison, EED, and Jim Dooley, Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate, and their partners at the Chinese Academy of Sciences' Institute of Rock and Soil Mechanics and Leonardo Technologies, Inc.

Energy Secretary Steven Chu also spoke at the conference and highlighted the team's research in his presentation.

The award came as the team was finishing its report on the five-year study. Their results showed that China has enormous and widely distributed deep geologic CO2 storage formations that could allow for cost-effective, large-scale deployment of capture and storage technologies for at least 100 years.

"For the first time ever, we have quantified the potential for future large-scale carbon capture and storage deployment within China," Bob said. "Our work suggests that CO2 capture and storage can provide a key element of China's portfolio of options for cost effectively reducing greenhouse gas emissions."

These findings are important as the international community looks for ways to balance economic growth and the resulting demands for energy with the need to reduce and mitigate greenhouse gas emissions globally.

Support for this research has been provided by the DOE Office of Fossil Energy, Leonardo Technologies, Inc. and the Global Energy Technology Strategy Program.  (Posted 10/1/2009)

columbus

Jim Thomas Receives Christopher Columbus Fellowship Foundation 2009 Homeland Security Award

Jim Thomas was recently awarded the Christopher Columbus Fellowship Foundation 2009 Homeland Security Award at the US Capital. This significant honor recognizes his international leadership and outstanding scientific achievements in founding and establishing the growing science of visual analytics and the numerous associated technologies that aid in detecting, predicting, preventing, and responding to acts of terrorism.

Jim's scientific leadership in visual analytics has resulted in the emergence and deployment of new information technologies critical to our nation's security. Visual analytics innovations developed under Jim's leadership have been deployed to national and regional analysts and first responders at a number of homeland security agencies and organizations. For example, the Scalable Reasoning System has provided law enforcement investigators with visual tools to discover patterns, trends, and relationships when and where it matters most—where lives are at stake. This technology has been deployed to front-line law enforcement and counter-terrorism personnel at the San Diego area Automated Regional Justice Information System (ARJIS), the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, and the Seattle Police Department. The ARJIS Executive Director described this capability as "critical" to officers on the ground.

Other deployed science enables understanding and management of our critical infrastructures e.g. power grid, cyber analytics to detect intrusion and other attacks on our communication networks, financial analytics to detect fraud and money flows, pandemic analytics to detect and plan for likely flu expansions, immigration analytics on applications to speed processing while enabling better detection of potential terrorists, to a host of intelligence applications through visual analytics of blogs and open source information in multiple languages with text, images and video.

This technology also provides far more effective analytics for applications such as energy, environment, economy, health, finance, and other critical parts of our society to every day access and dealing with masses of information on the Web. A unique capability has been developed under Jim's leadership to build test data sets with embedded threats (ground truth) now being used through international contests by IEEE that allows researchers and industry around the world to test and measure their technology, turning Jim's vision into a calibrated science enabling our knowledge workers to detect the expected and discovery of the unexpectedTM.

Equally important to the contributions Jim has made to this scientific field, he has played a critical visionary role in educating our next generation of scientists and engineers. He has led the development of a series of visual analytics workshops and tutorials at the university level. He has inspired degree and certificate programs, academic research programs and classes, workshops, summer camps, and faculty fellowships. His impact on future generations of visual analytics researchers helps ensure a steady pipeline of discoveries and technology solutions that can address homeland security challenges.

These advances would not be possible without the critical funding support from the Science and Technology Directorate of Department of Homeland Security, other members of the Intelligence Community and Department of Defense, U.S. National Science Foundation, our international partners protecting freedoms around the world and the professional society IEEE for providing the international science forums to build, publish and calibrate these new technologies.

Congress established the Christopher Columbus Fellowship Foundation in 1992 to "encourage and support research, study and labor designed to produce new discoveries in all fields of endeavor for the benefit of mankind." Each year, the foundation honors American citizens who improve the world through scientific endeavors. Recipients are selected from hundreds of nominations and are chosen by a panel of science, policy and other experts.  (Posted 9/1/2009)

innovator

Wei-Jun Qian Receives New Innovator Award from NIH Director to Develop Dramatically Improved Biomarker Research and Clinical Diagnostic Tools

Congratulations to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Dr. Wei-Jun Qian, who received a 2009 National Institutes of Health Director's New Innovator Award. The award is given to stimulate highly innovative research having the potential for significant impact and support promising early-career investigators.

The award, which includes a $1.5 million, 5-year grant, will support Qian's drive to make new research and clinical diagnostic tools that are dramatically more sensitive, reliable and faster than current technologies. His application was for "A Universal Multiplex Assay System for High-Throughput Clinical Applications."

Qian's research involves developing and applying novel mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches for quantifying changes in proteins from mammalian cells, tissues and biofluids. This work is helping the scientific community gain a better understanding of cell signaling and discovering novel mechanistic or diagnostic protein biomarkers for human diseases.

For more information, see PNNL's news release.  (Posted 9/1/2009)

community

Ted Poston earns 2009 Battelle Community Spirit Award

Battelle presented its 2009 Community Spirit Award to Ted Poston. This award provides staff an opportunity to recognize their peers for outstanding volunteer spirit. Nominees were evaluated on the level of their volunteer involvement and impact to the community.

Since 1985, Ted has volunteered as a coach, referee, and board official in TCJSA soccer, Columbia Little League in Richland, youth basketball in both Richland and Kennewick, and assisted as a general volunteer in both Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts. Between 1985-2001, Ted dedicated over 2,400 hours to these youth sports activities.  (Posted 8/1/2009)

mentor

Bonnie Williams Recognized with 2009 National Mentor Award

Bonnie Williams has recognized with the Adecco 2009 National Mentor Award. Adecco S.A. is a Global Fortune 500 company and the world leader in workforce solutions. The Mentor Award recognizes the top administrative professional who shares their time and talents with their colleagues.

Bonnie was nominated by PNNL's Executive Assistants National Awards Committee. Through her mentoring, Bonnie helps colleagues learn the importance of professionalism and how to apply their skills to future interactions with the Laboratory's national and international clients. Bonnie was honored for mentoring she provided to staff in EED as well as across the Laboratory and even to those outside of PNNL.  (Posted 8/1/2009)

PECASE

Alexandre Tartakovsky Wins Presidential Early Career Award

Congratulations to Dr. Alexandre Tartakovsky, a computational mathematician at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, for winning a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The award honors Tartakovsky's research on subsurface flow that addresses past and future energy needs: cleaning up buried nuclear or toxic contaminants and storing carbon dioxide from fossil fuels underground. Tartakovsky is an acknowledge leader in the field of computational mathematics for subsurface flow and transport in heterogeneous media.

The PECASE is the highest honor given by the U.S. government to scientists and engineers who are at the start of their careers.

Alex Tartakovsky in the field
Alexandre Tartakovsky's research uses dozens of monitoring wells to characterize the subsurface.

Tartakovsky was recognized for his work trying to understand how contaminants move through the subsurface, that subterranean environment made of rocks, air, liquids like water or oil, and bacteria. Ultimately, such work will help reduce the impacts that nuclear and fossil fuel energy use have on the environment. Tartakovsky develops mathematical models to help researchers clean up nuclear or toxic contaminants from past practices or help future waste managers store carbon in the subsurface.

Tartakovsky joined PNNL in 2004. He received his doctorate from the University of Arizona in 2002 and completed a two-year, post-doctoral research program at Idaho National Laboratory before joining PNNL.

For more information, see the PNNL news release.  (Posted 7/1/2009)

radiation

Bill Weber Named Distinguished Alumnus by University of Wisconsin Oshkosh

Dr. Bill Weber of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on being selected for the Distinguished Alumni Award, the highest University of Wisconsin Oshkosh alumni honor given. Weber and eight others will be honored for their professional and civic achievements during homecoming weekend, October 16-17, 2009.

Weber is an internationally recognized expert in defects and radiation effects in materials. His research, often done at the Department of Energy's EMSL, is essential for advanced electronic devices that operate in extreme conditions, developing radiation-tolerant materials for nuclear power, as well as for space exploration and research.

He received his bachelor's degree in physics from University of Wisconsin Oshkosh. While there, he was part of educational programs that allowed him to work and study at Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory. With this experience, he went on to get a master's degree and doctorate in nuclear engineering from University of Wisconsin Madison. An active member of the scientific community, he is a Fellow in the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Ceramic Society, and the Materials Research Society. He is a prolific author, having written or co-written more than 420 peer-reviewed publications and 51 technical reports. He is also an outstanding editor, currently serving as a principal editor for the Journal of Materials Research.  (Posted 6/1/2009)

advocate

Kim Fowler Receives LASER Science Education Advocate Award

Kim Fowler is one of five a recipients of a LASER Science Education Advocate Award for exhibiting outstanding advocacy for science education in the state of Washington by promoting the importance of science education among the general public or the education system. LASER is the Washington state Leadership and Assistance for Science Education Reform. Specifically, Kim was recognized for her development of a set of energy, environment and sustainable related activities she brings to classrooms. Each award recipient receives $5,000 to be awarded to the not-for-profit organization or public education entity of their choice for use in its efforts on behalf of science education. Kim has selected the Yakima Valley/Tri-Cities Mathematics, Engineering and Science Achievement (MESA) program.  (Posted 5/18/2009)

catalytic

Janos Szanyi Wins Fulbright Fellowship to Conduct Catalytic Research in Hungary

Janos Szanyi received a Fulbright Fellowship to spend 5 months in Hungary studying catalysts that may reduce nitrogen oxide emissions from cars and trucks. The Fulbright Fellowship is sponsored by the U.S. State Department. The fellowship provides opportunities for U.S. scientists to conduct research and exchange ideas with their new international colleagues.

During his stay in Budapest, Hungary, Janos will conduct in situ and operando studies aimed at understanding the kinetics and mechanisms of chemical reactions catalyzed by supported platinum/barium oxide systems. He will work at the Chemical Research Center, operated by the Hungarian Academy of Sciences. In addition, he will continue to lead his research at PNNL's Institute for Interfacial Catalysis.  (Posted 4/1/2009)

humboldt

Sotiris Xantheas Receives Humboldt Award to Collaborate in Germany

Sotiris Xantheas has received an international award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation to study the ubiquitous solvent: water. The award, presented by German President Horst Keller at the presidential residence in Berlin in early June, will cover Sotiris' travel to the Technical University of Munich at Garching and local expenses during his stay.

While at the university, Sotiris will work with Professor Alfred Laubereau and his students in the Physics Department on interpreting the infrared spectra of aqueous salts. This research into the molecular-level understanding of the interactions of water with various ions and how their presence alters the local structure of water has resulted in numerous scientific articles and stronger collaborations between U.S. and European institutions. This award to Sotiris closes out a series of studies he began 5 years ago as the recipient of the 2004 Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award.  (Posted 4/1/2009)

alumna

Xin Sun Receives Alumna Award

Congratulations to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Dr. Xin Sun, who received the prestigious Alumni Society Merit Award from the Department of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering at the University of Michigan. The award recognizes Dr. Sun for her outstanding professional achievements and her contributions to the society.

Dr. Sun has a broad range of experience in the areas of applied mechanics and computational materials. Her expertise lies in applying the mechanics and materials' basic principles in solving practical engineering problems associated with solid oxide fuel cell design and analyses, advanced laminated armor materials development, joining and forming of advanced lightweight materials for automotive and heavy vehicle applications, advanced high strength steel modeling development, and lightweight automotive glazing design and development.

Dr. Sun, a Staff Scientist in PNNL's Computational Sciences & Mathematics Division, received her undergraduate degree in naval architecture and ocean engineering from China's Shanghai Jiao Tong University in 1990. She then went on to earn two master's degrees and her doctorate, all from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.  (Posted 3/1/2009)

kappa

Jerry Posakony elected Eminent Member of Eta Kappa Nu

Jerry Posakony was recently elected an Eminent Member of Eta Kappa Nu. Eta Kappa Nu is a unique membership organization dedicated to encouraging and recognizing excellence in the electrical and computer engineering field. Members consist of students, alumni, and other professionals who have demonstrated exceptional academic and professional accomplishments. The designation of Eminent Member is the organization's highest membership grade and is conferred upon those select few whose outstanding technical attainments and contributions through leadership in the fields of electrical and computer engineering have significantly benefited society.  (Posted 1/1/2009)

PNNL Team Selected for 2009 Incite Award - Earns 4 Million Hours on Supercomputers to Study Water's Chemistry

DOE has awarded a team of researchers at PNNL a 2009 INCITE award. The award provides access to powerful supercomputers to model complex processes and analyze large data sets.

The team, which includes Shawn Kathmann, Chris Mundy, Roger Rousseau and Greg Schenter, all of the Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate, and a researcher at IBM Research-Zurich, received a total of 4 million hours on two of DOE's Advanced Scientific Computing Research's supercomputers. The team will have 2 million hours on the IBM Blue Gene/P at Argonne National Laboratory. In addition, it will get 2 million hours on the Cray XTs at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

The 4 million hours is a significant increase from the 1.5 million hours the team received from the 2008 INCITE award and will immensely enhance the team's research, according to Chris, the team leader and principal investigator of the INCITE research.

With the new award, the team will be able to continue running statistical and quantum mechanical calculations to explore the chemical physics of reactions that occur within and at the interface of hydrogen-bonded liquids, like water. The calculations and resulting models will accurately portray reactions under experimentally relevant conditions.

This research requires the processing speed and power of supercomputers. Standard desktop systems are simply incapable of running the proposed calculations.

This research could provide insights on reactions that occur in water and other hydrogen-bonding fluids. "Understanding the reactions that occur in water have far-reaching implications in many areas of science," Chris said. Elucidating the solvation of ions in the vicinity of interfaces and in bulk will help us control many processes in chemistry, atmospheric science, and biology.

This work supports PNNL's mission to strengthen U.S. scientific foundations for innovation by

  • developing transformational tools, techniques and facilities, including those for advanced modeling and computation, for the biological, chemical, environmental and physical sciences via EMSL and other user facilities.
  • developing tools and understanding required to control chemical and physical processes in complex multiphase environments.
 (Posted 1/1/2009)

 

2009 Fellowships

APS

Greg Schenter Appointed American Physical Society Fellow

Congratulations to Dr. Greg Schenter of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on being named a Fellow of the American Physical Society, the world's second largest organization of physicists. Schenter earned this honor for his contributions in chemical physics.

In his research, Schenter has uncovered mysteries surrounding the physics of molecules and atoms. "I started my career as a physicist and became a chemist," said Schenter. "These days disciplines are becoming melded."

Examples of his research include developing accurate methods for calculating how small, light molecules and atoms would move and react in solids and in solution.

These methods are vital to those building better batteries and alternative fuels. Another example is his theory of how droplets form or nucleate, improving previous theories and changing the way scientists see everything from cloud formation to fuel cells.

Schenter's work has appeared in top journals. In fact, nearly half of his publications land in top 5 journals. He is among the most highly cited authors at PNNL.  (Posted 12/1/2009)

Six PNNL scientists elected AAAS Fellows

Six scientists from the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for their exceptional efforts to advance science or its applications.

The PNNL honorees and the AAAS sections that elected them are: Scott Chambers, physics; Moe Khaleel, engineering; Yuehe Lin, chemistry; Philip Rasch, atmospheric and hydrospheric sciences; John Wacker, chemistry; and Sotiris Xantheas, chemistry.

Scott Chambers

Chambers researches crystalline oxide films that can be used in the semiconductors that enable most modern electrical devices. He's known for growing these films and exploring their structure. He examines the electronic and magnetic properties of crystalline films, or their ability to transform electricity from chemicals responding to light. These films have the potential to be used to make microelectronic devices, convert energy and make energy by splitting water. They're also studied for the field of spintronics, where scientists are trying to harness the magnetic properties of electrons.

Chambers is a PNNL laboratory fellow who works in interfacial chemistry and engineering at EMSL, a DOE national scientific user facility located at PNNL. He's also an American Vacuum Society fellow and an affiliate professor of chemistry, materials science and engineering at the University of Washington.

Yuehe Lin

Lin's research delves into nanotechnology, or devices made with tiny particles that are a hundred thousand times smaller than a human hair. He's developing chemical and biological sensors made with nanomaterials like protein cages, nanoparticles, graphene and carbon nanotubes that interact with enzymes, antibodies and DNA. The technologies he's developing can detect important molecules in biological systems, explosives and pesticides and could deliver drugs to fight diseases like cancer, among other uses.

Lin is a PNNL laboratory fellow at PNNL. He has edited and co-edited several books on nanotechnology. He also is the associate editor of the Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, as well as a member of the editorial advisory boards for several international scientific journals.

Moe Khaleel

Khaleel specializes in computational engineering, which involves designing and developing computational tools to solve engineering and scientific problems. He focuses on computational models for solid oxide fuel cells and advanced lightweight materials. He develops methods and computational tools that allow scientists and engineers to build and test fuels cells and their material components, which speeds up the development of energy technologies like fuel cells. He also created a cost-effective process for forming aluminum sheet materials that are now used to make lightweight vehicles.

Khaleel is a laboratory fellow who leads PNNL's Computational Sciences and Mathematics Division. He's also an adjunct professor of mechanical engineering and materials science at Washington State University and an American Society of Mechanical Engineers fellow.

Philip Rasch

Rasch is recognized for his contributions to climate modeling - or designing computational programs that mimic the atmosphere - and connecting cloud formation, atmospheric chemistry and climate. He has developed and improved many atmospheric circulation models, some of which simulate the movement of water vapor, sulfate and other tiny, unseen particles of gas, water and matter called aerosols. He also studies geoengineering, or the intentional manipulation of the atmosphere to counteract global warming.

Rasch is a laboratory fellow and chief scientist for climate science at PNNL. He has contributed to scientific assessments for the World Meteorological Organization, NASA and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

John Wacker

Wacker's insights into the field of nuclear signature analysis are highly sought-after by government and scientific leaders alike. Nuclear signatures, or chemical and radiological indicators of nuclear processing, are of particular interest to national security officials monitoring nuclear activities and in the emerging area of nuclear forensics. His research has supported the cleanup of radioactive contamination in the environment. He often serves as an advisor in radioanalytical chemistry and nuclear forensics for government leaders.

Wacker is a PNNL laboratory fellow and a nuclear materials technical advisor for DOE. He began his career in planetary science, for which he characterized and determined the origin of meteorites.

Sotiris Xantheas

Xantheas' highly accurate electron structure calculations on water-based molecular clusters are used widely in the physical chemistry community. He combines data gathered in the lab and with computer theories to refine scientists' understanding of aqueous systems and water. His work helps scientists better understand the structure of latticed hydrates in the ocean's floor that store the greenhouse gas methane, among many other applications.

Xantheas is a PNNL laboratory fellow. He's also a fellow of the American Physical Society and was given the Wilhelm Bessel Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation.

See news release at http://www.pnl.gov/news/release.aspx?id=761  (Posted 12/1/2009)

womanfellow

L. Ruby Leung elected AMS Fellow

Congratulations to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Dr. L. Ruby Leung on her election as Fellow of the American Meteorological Society. The Society awards the distinction of Fellow to only two-tenths of one percent of its membership each year. Leung was cited for her outstanding individual contributions and leadership in the development and application of regional climate models. She will be recognized in January 2010 at the Society's 90th Annual Review and Fellows Awards in Atlanta, Georgia.

Leung is a Laboratory Fellow in the PNNL Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division and a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In his nomination letter, Dr. Gerald R. North of Texas A&M University cited Leung's work in regional climate models, an impressive citation record, and her outstanding leadership role within the U.S. Department of Energy climate science community. In addition, he praised her leadership with the National Center for Atmospheric Research in advancing the Weather Research and Forecasting model for climate research, and in projects such as the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program, as demonstration of her prominence in the atmospheric and climate science community.

Leung is recognized in the international scientific community for her pioneering contributions in regional climate modeling and research on land-atmosphere interactions and their roles in climate variability and change. Her work on regional climate projections was included in scientific assessments done by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007. In collaboration with the National Center for Atmospheric Research, Leung has been developing and applying advanced regional climate models that will help improve the predictions of climate change and its impacts. Her research on climate change effects has been featured in Science, Popular Science, The Wall Street Journal, National Public Radio, and many other major news outlets.

The AMS, founded in 1919, has a membership of more than 14,000 professionals, professors, students, and weather enthusiasts. The AMS produces nine atmospheric and related oceanic and hydrologic journals, sponsors multiple annual conferences, and directs numerous education and outreach programs and services.  (Posted 10/1/2009)

Steve Mladineo named Fellow of the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management

Steve Mladineo joined Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 1993 and has managed the Nuclear Arms Control and Nonproliferation Product Line, has been the PNNL Account Manager for DOE Nonproliferation Offices and has also provided technical support to nonproliferation programs at DOE headquarters. He is currently Senior Advisor within PNNL Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Programs Sector and provides technical support to the Office of National Infrastructure and Sustainability within the Office of International Material Protection and Cooperation at the National Nuclear Security Administration.

He is a long-time supporter of the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management (INMM) having become a regular member of the Institute in 1994 shortly after beginning his career with PNNL. He became a Senior Member of the Institute in 2000 and has been active with both the Northeast and Pacific Northwest Chapters.

Since joining INMM, Steve has demonstrated sustained leadership and commitment. He has served on the Technical Program Committee, has presented papers and chaired many sessions at the Annual Meetings and has been Chair of the Nonproliferation and Arms Control Division since 2000. He has participated in four quadrennial INMM/ANS International Meetings on Facility Operations-Safeguards Interface and served as the General Chair of the 2008 International Conference held in Portland, Oregon. Additionally, he was awarded the INMM Meritorious Service Award in 2007.

His experience with the INMM has permitted him to interact with colleagues from a broad cross section of the INMM membership, including international colleagues. The INMM mission aligns with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Security mission, as well as the mission of other client-funding sponsors who are represented by PNNL.  (Posted 7/1/2009)

fellow

Jean Futrell Elected Fellow of American Chemical Society

Congratulations to Dr. Jean Futrell of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on being selected for the inaugural class of American Chemical Society Fellows. The American Chemical Society, with more than 150,000 members, is one of the world's largest scientific organizations. This prominent honor, given to only 0.1% of the society's members, reflects Futrell's scientific achievements and his contributions to the research community.

His research focuses on the theory and practice of mass spectroscopy. His work has answered fundamental questions about mass spectrometry, including the behavior of ions. He has developed or modified instruments for specialized research, creating high-pressure and chemical-ionization mass spectrometers. His invention of tandem mass spectrometry is deployed in nearly every commercial mass spectrometer.

In the scientific community, Futrell is a quiet, diplomatic, and highly effective leader. He has served as chair and past chair of the American Society of Mass Spectrometry; he is currently on the society's executive committee. He has also served as president and past president of the Council for Chemical Research, which advances scientific research to benefit society. The first director of the Department of Energy's EMSL, Futrell is a prolific writer with more than 400 refereed articles and invited reviews to his name.

Throughout his career, Futrell has been recognized by his peers. As a mass spectrometry expert, he was named the German Mass Spectrometry Society's Wolfgang Paul Distinguished Lecturer-the fourth American to receive such an honor. He won the FH Field and JL Franklin Award, the ACS's top honor for fundamental science in mass spectrometry. Further, he is a Fellow in three societies: the American Physical Society, the American Society for the Advancement of Science, and the World Innovation Foundation.

Futrell and the other ACS Fellows will be honored at a special ceremony during the ACS National Meeting in Washington, D.C., on Monday, August 17, 2009.  (Posted 7/1/2009)

international

Gary Yang Selected Fellow of ASM International

Gary Yang was elected a 2009 ASM International Fellow. This honor recognizes members of the nearly 100-year-old professional society for their distinguished work in materials research and engineering. Yang was chosen for his contributions in developing materials for energy conversion and storage, and his work on understanding metallic interconnections with electrodes in solid oxide fuel cells.

At PNNL for the Transformational Materials Science Initiative, Yang and his team are developing nanostructured electrodes and electrolytes as well as synthesizing novel structures. These materials could fix the Achilles' heel of wind and solar energy: their intermittent nature. Using new materials and designs, Yang and his team are working on batteries that will move wind and solar from alternative to mainstream power sources.

In research circles, Yang is known for his focused approach to research and his easy-going nature. "Gary doesn't take setbacks to heart," said his manager Darrell Herling. "He just rolls with the punches."

As to his focus, it is obvious in his outstanding publications record. He has written or co-written 140+ scientific papers and book chapters. He has organized or co-organized a dozen of seminars and conferences, and served as editor on numerous proceedings. He has also edited four special issues of journals.  (Posted 7/1/2009)

Yang

Gary Yang elected Fellow of ASM International

Gary Yang was recently elected an ASM International Fellow. This honor recognizes members of the nearly 100-year-old professional society for their distinguished work in materials research and engineering. Yang was chosen for his contributions in developing materials for energy conversion and storage, and his work advancing the understanding of metallic interconnections with electrodes in solid oxide fuel cells.

At PNNL, for the Transformational Materials Science Initiative, Yang and his team are developing nanostructured electrodes and electrolytes as well as synthesizing novel structures. These materials could fix the Achilles' heel of wind and solar energy: their intermittent nature. Using new materials and designs, Yang and his team are developing batteries that will move wind and solar from alternative to mainstream power sources.  (Posted 6/1/2009)

glass

SK Sundaram Named Fellow of the Society of Glass Technology

SK Sundaram, Energy & Environment Directorate, was recently named Fellow to the Society of Glass Technology, UK. Fellowship of the Society is awarded to members who have reached prescribed levels of attainment in the business of glass and associated industries and for recognized contributions to the science and technology of glass.

Over the past 15 years, Sundaram has conducted research on various aspects of energy and environments. He is internationally recognized for interdisciplinary research in the areas of millimeter/THz wave technology, nanomaterials/toxicity, integrated infrared photonics, multi-scale materials processing, and materials and sensors for energy conversion.

Dr. Sundaram is now leading a multidisciplinary team of engineers and scientists in a quest to understand degradation mechanisms, protect materials, and develop sensors in challenging gasification environments under the Energy Conversion Initiative at PNNL. He has won numerous awards and honors, including two R&D100 awards.  (Posted 3/1/2009)

fellow

David S. Smith Elected Fellow of ASCE

David S. Smith was elected Fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). The ASCE Fellow award is a prestigious honor held by fewer than six percent of its 75,000 regular members and another 60,000 associate, affiliate or student ASCE members. David was recognized for being an outstanding "practitioner, educator, mentor and most of all leader." The ASCE is a non-profit organization dedicated to having engineers positioned as global leaders who strive toward building a better quality of life.  (Posted 3/1/2009)

chemist

Bruce Garrett Elected Fellow of Royal Society of Chemists

As director of Chemical and Materials Sciences Division, Garrett has primary responsibility for PNNL's work in developing the tools and understanding to control chemical and physical processes in complex multiphase environments. His major accomplishments in physical chemistry are in developing theoretical approaches to determine rates of molecular processes in gas and condensed phases, including the first consistent molecular theory of gas-to-particle nucleation.

The Royal Society of Chemistry has more than 44,000 members worldwide. The largest chemical society in Europe, the organization works to promote the development, practice, and application of the chemical sciences across the world. In particular, the society encourages the participation of students and young people in chemistry.  (Posted 2/1/2009)

 

2009 Elected Positions and Offices

BERAC

L. Ruby Leung Elected to Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee

Dr. L. Ruby Leung, a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist who has long been at the forefront of climate modeling research, was recently elected to serve on the Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC), where she will provide advice on a continuing basis to the Director of the Office of Science, Department of Energy, on the many complex scientific and technical issues that arise in the development and implementation of the biological and environmental research program.

Leung is widely considered one of the top few researchers in the United States and the world in regional climate modeling, and is internationally recognized for her research on regional climate change and the hydrological cycle. In alignment with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) missions, her innovations cross scientific disciplines to advance the state of the art in predicting climate change and its regional impacts. By delivering more accurate and geographically specific insights for making decisions and taking action, her work has helped DOE and the scientific community to address some of the toughest problems in climate science.

Dr. Leung has been named a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Meteorological Society. She has published over 80 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters; her research on climate change impacts has been featured in Science, Popular Science, Wall Street Journal, National Public Radio, and many major newspapers.

The Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee advises the Secretary of Energy and Director, Office of Science, on biological and environmental science issues of concern. BERAC is responsible for periodic reviews of and recommendations for elements of the Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Program; providing advice on competing long-range plans, priorities, and strategies; giving guidance on appropriate levels of funding to develop priorities and strategies; and maintaining balance between competing elements of the BER Program.  (Posted 12/1/2009)

techtransfer

Cheryl Cejka Picked to Head DOE Tech Transfer Group

The Department of Energy has named Cheryl Cejka, technology commercialization director at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), executive board chair of the agency's Technology Transfer Working Group.

The group is creating a policy framework to streamline technology transfer activities such as licensing at all DOE national laboratories. Laboratory-developed technologies can be used in commercial products after being licensed to outside businesses. The working group's members are from across the DOE's national laboratories.

Cejka has led PNNL's portfolio development and investment, intellectual property management and technology commercialization activities for eight years. PNNL's annual returns from intellectual assets have increased since then. Cejka also oversaw the creation of many technology licensing arrangements, which resulted in new business ventures based on PNNL technologies. Many of these transactions received national recognition for excellence in technology transfer.  (Posted 1/1/2009)

hps

Kathy Pryor elected president-elect of the Health Physics Society

Kathy Pryor, chief health physicist in the Operational Systems Directorate, has been elected president-elect of the Health Physics Society (HPS), a nonprofit scientific organization whose mission is to promote excellence in the science and practice of radiation safety.

As president-elect, Kathy will be responsible for assisting the society president in administering the affairs of the society, and will automatically take office as president in July 2011 for her three-year term. In her capacity as president-elect, Kathy will visit the approximately 40 chapters of the HPS. Kathy has been a member of HPS since 1980 and served the society through her participation in numerous committees, as a director and as secretary.

For the past 28 years, Kathy has provided management and technical support to radiation protection programs at radiological facilities regulated by DOE, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Agreement States. Currently, Kathy has responsibility for technical support and improvement of PNNL's Radiation Protection program. She is also the chief radiological engineer in the design of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility project, a major component of the surplus plutonium disposition strategy for the National Nuclear Security Administration. Kathy is responsible for coordinating the PNNL Environment, Health, Safety and Security Division management systems for Radiation Protection, Worker Safety and Health, Safeguards and Security, and Environmental Management. She is a trained causal analyst and has led a number of cross-disciplinary teams in the investigation of events at PNNL.  (Posted 12/1/2009)

treasurer

Ron Jarnagin Elected ASHRAE Treasurer

Ron Jarnagin will be assuming the office of Treasurer of ASHRAE for the 2009-2010 Society Year – an opportunity given by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers, an international organization of 51,000 persons. The Treasurer position is one of three senior officers of ASHRAE; the other two are President Elect and President. The term of office is one year for each of the senior positions and it is expected that the candidate will move through the positions to assume the Presidency.

As Treasurer Ron will chair the Finance Committee which is responsible for ASHRAE's $20 million annual budget; will serve as Vice Chairman of Members Council, which oversees all of the volunteer activities in ASHRAE's 14 global regions; will serve as the Vice Chair of ASHRAE's Advocacy Committee, which informs and influences the decisions of Congress on technical matters related to ASHRAE's mission; will serve as a member of the Board of Directors; and also will serve on ASHRAE's Executive Committee, which provides strategic leadership for the Board.  (Posted 6/1/2009)

Seaborg

Mathew Milazzo Named 2009 ANS Glenn T. Seaborg Science and Engineering Congressional Fellow

Matthew D. Milazzo, a nuclear engineer at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, Washshington, was selected as the 2009 ANS Glenn T. Seaborg Science and Engineering Congressional Fellow. During his one-year term beginning in January 2009, Milazzo will work as a special legislative assistant on the staff of Sen. George Voinovich (R., Ohio), where he will serve as a scientific and technical resource on issues related to nuclear energy.

Milazzo believes that his role is to bridge the gap between those who understand science and technology and those who create and influence policy. "I hope to be an honest broker who can create positive changes in perceptions of nuclear power and technologies one person at a time," he said. Milazzo's goals stem from his firsthand experience on Capitol Hill, meeting people who are misinformed about nuclear technology and industry.

Since August 2007, he has served as the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science Congressional Fellow assigned to Sen. Maria Cantwell (D., Wash.). There he provides technical expertise in the areas of energy, climate change, and national security. On the staff of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since 2005, Milazzo has also delivered programmatic and engineering analysis support to several U.S. government clients. Previously, he served as a business process analyst at PricewaterhouseCoopers in Washington, D.C.

Milazzo also spent six years in the U.S. Navy as a nuclear mechanical operator aboard the USS South Carolina, a guided missile cruiser. He then earned a bachelor's degree in bioengineering and economics from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000 and master's degrees in nuclear engineering and public policy and management from Ohio State University (OSU) in 2004. Milazzo joined ANS in 2002 while a graduate student at OSU, and served as the student section vice president. He now serves on the ANS Public Policy Committee.

Milazzo plans to further the Society's contribution to national policy dialogue. "As climate change legislation continues to take form, the ANS fellow should keep ANS involved by leveraging the organization's substantial technical expertise to secure nuclear power's role in climate change policy," Milazzo stated. Through the coordination of informational briefings to connect government officials with nuclear industry experts, Milazzo hopes to provide direction for programs that aim to expand the peaceful use of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks.

Milazzo, one of four candidates interviewed this year by the ANS Congressional Fellowship Committee, is the ninth person chosen for the fellowship since the program's inception in 2000. ANS is one of more than 30 science and engineering societies that participate in the Partner Scientific Society-sponsored Congressional Fellowship Program administered by the American Association for the Advancement of Science.  (Posted 1/1/2009)

co-chair

Richard May Named IEEE VAST Symposium Co-chair

Richard May has been unanimously approved by the IEEE VAST (Visual Analytics Science and Technology) Steering committee as the IEEE VAST symposium co-chair with Jörn Kohlhammer from Fraunhofer in Germany. IEEE VAST is one of the fastest growing national and international scientific communities.

IEEE VAST is the first international symposium dedicated to advances in Visual Analytics Science and Technology. The scope of the symposium, co-located with the annual IEEE Visualization Conference (IEEE Vis) and the IEEE Information Visualization Conference (IEEE InfoVis), includes both fundamental research contributions within visual analytics as well as applications of visual analytics, including applications in science, security and investigative analysis, engineering, medicine, health, media, business, and social interaction.

As Deputy Director for the Department of Homeland Security's National Visualization and Analytics Center (NVAC), Dr. May develops opportunities to transfer technologies to meet the needs of regional preparedness experts and coordinates visual analytics research across government and academic partners. He received his B.S. and M.S. in Computer Science from Washington State University and his Ph.D. in Industrial Engineering from the University of Washington.

Throughout his career, Dr. May has focused on designing new technologies and protocols to generate and interact with complex, massive data sets. He has conducted research in video and image processing, information visualization, virtual and mixed reality and visual analytics. In the early 1990s, he transitioned his research from visualizing science to interacting with the visualizations, to better understand the complex nature of the problems being studied. This new focus led to research in both the logical and physical aspects of interacting with electronic information and eventually to looking at analytical processes and visual analytics.  (Posted 1/1/2009)

SGIP

PNNL principal engineer Steve Widergren has been appointed plenary chair of the newly formed Smart Grid Interoperability Panel (SGIP)

The SGIP will support the U.S. Commerce Department's National Institute of Standards and Technology's effort to coordinate the expedited development of technical standards for smart grid implementations throughout the nation. Widergren will set the agenda for the SGIP's twice yearly meetings and pick leaders for the group's architecture and testing/certification committees.

The SGIP is a public-private partnership with more than 400 member organizations. The group has three primary functions including:

  • Overseeing activities intended to expedite the development of interoperability and cyber security specifications by standards setting organizations;
  • Providing technical guidance to facilitate development of standards for a secure, interoperable smart grid; and
  • Specifying testing and certification requirements necessary to assess the interoperability of smart grid-related equipment.

For more information about the SGIP visit www.nist.gov/smartgrid.  (Posted 12/1/2009)

ncar

Jerome Fast Appointed NCAR Affiliate Scientist

Congratulations to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Dr. Jerome Fast on his appointment as an affiliate scientist for the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado. The University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Board of Trustees appointed Fast to the three-year position starting November 1, 2009. As part of his appointment, Jerome will work in Boulder for at least three months, collaborating with scientists in the Atmospheric Chemistry Division of NCAR on aerosol modeling projects.

He will coordinate the implementation of improved representations of secondary organic aerosols in models and how they are evaluated using field measurements. Other research will include coordinating the implementation of new process modules developed by PNNL and NCAR staff into the community Weather Research and Forecasting model.

NCAR is known worldwide as one of the premiere centers for improving the understanding of atmospheric and Earth system processes. Only a select number of scientists are appointed to the prestigious position of affiliate scientist there. PNNL's Dr. Ruby Leung also serves as an NCAR affiliate scientist.  (Posted 11/1/2009)

treaty

Ted Bowyer Appointed Member on National Academy of Sciences Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Panel

With the Obama Administration already pushing for Senate ratification of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT), the National Academy of Sciences has again convened a panel to study technical issues related to the treaty. The 10-member NAS panel, chaired by University of Maryland physics professor Ellen Williams, has been tasked by the National Nuclear Security Administration and the State Department to update the 2002 NAS study on the CTBT. The CTBT bans all nuclear explosions in all environments for military or civilian purposes.

The NAS panel will include two members of the 2002 study and eight other members, including Ted Bowyer, NSD. Ted is a nuclear explosion monitoring expert at PNNL and a former Department of Energy/NNSA scientific adviser on the CTBT.

Ted has worked at PNNL in a variety of nonproliferation programs related to nuclear weapons material production detection, nuclear testing detection, and nonproliferation policy. He spent several years in the Office of Nonproliferation Policy at DOE/NNSA where he served as a scientific advisor on the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty and related Nuclear Testing Limitations treaties and agreements, as well as the Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty. He has spent significant time serving the U.S. Delegations to the Conference on Disarmament in Geneva and CTBT Working Group B (WGB) in Vienna as a technical advisor. Currently, Ted serves as the chair of the CTBT working group B (WGB) Radionuclide Expert Group and chair of the U.S. Radionuclide Subgroup of the Verification Monitoring Task Force.

For more information about the study, visit http://www8.nationalacademies.org/cp/projectview.aspx?key=49131.  (Posted 8/1/2009)

Irv Schultz Nominated to NRC Committee on Tetrachloroethylene

Irv Schultz was nominated to the National Academy of Sciences National Research Council Committee on Tetrachloroethylene, which is conducting a review of EPA's toxicological assessment of tetrachloroethylene. His research interests cover both ecological and human health issues and uses toxicokinetic methods in conjunction with molecular/biochemical tools to understand the cellular mechanisms and physiological processes determining the retention and adverse effects of contaminants. Highlights of his research efforts include studies of the disposition of drinking water disinfection byproducts in human volunteers, non-human primates and rodent models; development of computational models for the salmon brain-pituitary-gonadal axis and the metabolism and disposition of environmental pollutants in fish, with an emphasis on interspecies scaling.  (Posted 6/1/2009)

proteomics

Dick Smith Named Editor-in Chief of Journal of Proteomics & Bioinformatics

Richard D. Smith has accepted an invitation to become Editor-in Chief of the Journal of Proteomics & Bioinformatics. Smith sets the direction for the open-access journal and gives final approval for each issue.

Founded in 2008, the Journal of Proteomics & Bioinformatics strives to provide rapid review and publishing of research in the proteomics and bioinformatics fields. The journal disseminates its articles freely for research, teaching and reference purposes.

Smith, a Battelle Fellow and Chief Scientist of Proteomics at PNNL, is a world leader in developing mass spectrometry for proteomics. He was recently named PNNL's Inventor of the Year for Fiscal Year 2008. Smith has received 36 U.S. patents and 32 foreign patents, seven R&D 100 Awards, the 2003 American Chemical Society Award for Analytical Chemistry and induction as a Battelle "Distinguished Inventor."  (Posted 6/1/2009)

NIH

Joshua Adkins Named to NIH Study Section

Joshua Adkins was invited by the National Institutes of Health Center for Scientific Review to serve as a member of the Enabling Bioanalytical and Biophysical Study Section. His term is from July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2013.

This study section reviews grant applications focused on developing new bioanalytical and biophysical tools, emerging techniques and instrumentation. Emphasis is on research that probes the molecular aspects of biological systems using novel technologies or enhancements on existing techniques.

Dr. Adkins' research centers on comprehensive characterization of proteins through space and time to better understand biological systems. His particular interests are challenging biological studies that require bridging the gaps between technology development and biological application. Currently, he is Director for the Center for Systems Biology of EnteroPathogens, the aim of which is to develop therapeutics for the causative agents of Typhoid Fever and the Black Plague.  (Posted 5/1/2009)

editor

Liem Dang Serves as a Guest Editor of Special Issue of Physical Chemistry Journal

Liem Dang was invited to serve as guest editor on a special issue of The Journal of Physical Chemistry A . This issue was dedicated to the Max Wolfsberg, a leader in theoretical chemistry. Wolfsberg's early work led to the Wolfsberg-Helmholtz approximation, widely used in calculations of molecular electronic energy levels. His descriptions of isotope effects on chemical reactions are widely used by experimental chemists.

As a guest editor, Dang solicited, reviewed, and edited many of the 40 scientific articles that grace this March 2009 issue. Dang is a respected researcher and author on molecular dynamics simulation techniques to study ionic solvation, ion-ligand complexation, and properties of liquid interfaces. This special issue was made possible because of his close work with Wolfsberg during Dang's doctoral research at University of California, Irvine.  (Posted 5/1/2009)

council

Steven Wiley Invited to Join National Research Council Review Panel

Steven Wiley, Lead Scientist for Biology at the Department of Energy's EMSL, was selected to serve as a reviewer on the 2009 National Research Council Research Associateship Programs. The programs fund postdoctoral fellows, senior scientists and engineers, and faculty to work on research problems of their choice in federal laboratories. The Council receives around 800 applications every year for these programs. The NRC selects about 300 of these applications for funding based on a competitive process that includes a review by one of five NRC panels.

One of the five panels is the Life Sciences panel, where Wiley will serve. On this panel, he will evaluate the impact and the approach of the research proposed in the applications four times a year. Also, he will discuss his recommendations with his colleagues on the panel, working to promote only the best possible research. Wiley will serve on the panel for three years.

Wiley was chosen because of his scientific expertise in molecular and systems biology, such as the research into large-scale protein-protein interactions and cell signaling networks. In addition, he is an experienced leader, currently working as the steward for EMSL's Biological Interactions and Dynamics science theme and as Director of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Biomolecular Systems Initiative. Further, he has experience with advisory committees, including the National Institutes of Health and Burroughs Wellcome Fund.  (Posted 2/1/2009)

SciDB

Todd Halter Appointed to SciDB Advisory Board

Todd Halter has been appointed to the SciDB advisory board. SciDB is an open source data management system designed to support the needs of scientists across a variety of disciplines. As a member of the advisory board, Halter will be helping to establish the requirements for a new database technology specifically targeting scientific applications.

SciDB grew out of the 1st Extremely Large Databases (XLDB) Workshop and the subsequent Science-Database Workshop. SciDB is designed to meet the growing demands of data-intensive scientific analytics in the public and private sectors. User communities expected to benefit include sciences such as astronomy, biology, geoscience (geology, oceanography, atmospheric science, environmental science), medicine, and physics; science-based industries such as remote sensing, resource extraction (oil, gas, minerals), medical imaging, and pharmaceuticals; and other organizations with vast amounts of data and complex analytical needs such as Internet, telecommunications, and financial services.

Halter, whose appointment began in November 2008, joins Gordon Anderson (PNNL); Tim Axelrod, LSST Corporation; Dirk Duellmann, (CERN); Tim Frazier, Los Alamos National Laboratory; James Frew, University of California, Santa Barbara; Michael Godin, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute; and Bill Howe, Oregon Health & Science University, on the SciDB advisory board.  (Posted 2/1/2009)

OptoElectronics

Wenning Liu Appointed to the Editorial Board of Advances in OptoElectronics

Wenning Liu has been appointed to the Editorial Board of Advances in OptoElectronics as an associate editor. Liu's appointment began November 2008. Advances in OptoElectronics is a peer-reviewed open access journal aimed at accelerating worldwide recognition, dissemination, and utilization of the most recent findings and achievements in optoelectronics.

Liu Joined PNNL in 2005 and has more than 18 years of research experience in the fields of computational material, computational mechanics, and mathematics with related expertise in: finite element analysis, fatigue/failure/fracture tests and analyses; thermal-mechanical design; dynamic simulation of high speed impact; and CAD/CAM/CFD design and modeling. In the area of optoelectronics, Liu's research is focused on the reliability analysis, and design of optoelectronic packaging, including failure analysis of optoelectronic packaging, development of automatic alignment algorithm of optoelectronic packaging, and stress analysis of various IC packaging.

Liu has a doctorate from the Harbin Institute of Technology's School of Aerospace Engineering in Harbin, China.  (Posted 1/1/2009)

chemical

Kelly Sullivan Elected to Governing Board of Council for Chemical Research

Kelly Sullivan, Office of the Deputy Director for Science and Technology, was elected to the Governing Board of the Council for Chemical Research (CCR) in December 2008. Kelly Sullivan was nominated for the position and her appointment was confirmed by vote from the CCR membership. She will serve a full term of three years and represent the Laboratory and other government and national laboratories on the board.

The Council for Chemical Research, headquartered in Washington, D.C., aims to benefit society by influencing the success of chemistry-related science and engineering research. It promotes cooperation in basic research and encourages high-quality education in the chemical sciences and engineering. The Council's membership comprises more than 200 companies, universities and government laboratories with a combined research and development budget of more than $7 billion.

Kelly Sullivan, who leads the Laboratory's Office of Institutional Partnerships, was already active in the Council for Chemical Research before receiving the current board appointment. She serves as co-chair of The Council's Annual Meeting Planning committee and she co-leads the Graduate Education Action Network.  (Posted 1/1/2009)

Kay

Bruce D. Kay Invited to Join Journal of Chemical Physics Editorial Board

Bruce D. Kay has accepted an invitation to join the editorial board of the Journal of Chemical Physics. As a board member, Kay will referee submissions and help monitor the journal's editorial policy in terms of scope covered and paper quality. His three-year appointment begins in January 2009.

The Journal of Chemical Physics, published by the American Institute of Physics, contains articles on research in methods and applications of traditional and newer areas of chemical physics. The institute publishes content online daily and in 48 printed issues a year.

Kay is an international expert in condensed phase chemical kinetics and molecular dynamics. His work provides a detailed understanding of the molecular-level interactions responsible for phase transitions and catalytic reactions. Kay conducts much of his work at the Department of Energy's EMSL, a national scientific user facility at PNNL.

Kay is also known for his experience as a noted author and conscientious reviewer. Kay has written or co-written more than 120 journal articles and technical reports. He mentors many postdoctoral fellows at PNNL both in research and in preparing manuscripts for publication.  (Posted 1/1/2009)

editorial

Yanwen Zhang joins Editorial Board of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research

Yanwen Zhang, a scientist at the Department of Energy's EMSL, has been invited to serve a 3-year term on the advisory editorial board of Nuclear Instruments & Methods in Physics Research, Section B. This journal, published by Elsevier, is one of the top-10 journals by impact factor in the field of nuclear science and technology and covers all aspects of the interaction of energetic beams, such as ion, electron, and photon beams, with solids. Related topics, such as applying ion beam analysis to biological, archaeological and geological samples, are covered. Notable conferences publish their proceedings in this peer-reviewed journal.

At EMSL, Zhang leads materials analysis and modification research projects in the ion accelerator laboratory. Her work covers topics such as single ion impact, nanoscale defect engineering, ion/electron-solid interaction, radiation detector physics, ion-beam modification and synthesis of materials, electrochemical oxidation of nuclear reactor fuel cladding, and application of ion-beam analysis techniques. Because of her research and experience, Zhang has participated in prestigious symposiums, including the 2008 German-American Frontiers of Engineering Symposium and the 14th Annual German-American Kavli Frontiers of Science Symposium. Also, she has won several awards, including the 2005 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers and the docent title from the Lund University in Sweden.

With her collaborators around the world, she has written or co-written more than 120 journal articles. She is a co-editor for a book Ion Beams in Nanoscience and Technology (Springer Verlag, Berlin). She regularly mentors her postdoctoral fellows and collaborators in writing articles and is known as an outstanding reviewer.  (Posted 1/1/2009)

Canadian

Eric Richman Joins Canadian Task Group on Lighting and Electrical Power

Eric Richman was invited to become an official member of the Canadian Task Group on Lighting and Electrical Power as they gear up to update Canada's Model National Energy Code for Buildings.

He is lending his expertise to help Canada make its buildings more energy efficient—thus saving energy, saving money and lowering their carbon footprint. Eric, a lighting expert for the DOE's Building Energy Codes Program (BECP), has informally supported the Canadian Task Group on Lighting and Electrical Power since July 2008.

In his work with BECP, Eric supports DOE's Commercial Codes Initiative by helping the primary commercial code-making body in the U.S., American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, increase the stringency and applicability of energy standards for new buildings. In its invitation to Eric, the Canadian group wrote "Your input to date has been invaluable to the Task Group and is greatly appreciated." More Info... (.doc)  (Posted 1/1/2009)

 

2009 Impact on Scientific Community

spectroscopy

Kukkadapu Recognized as International Leader in Mössbauer Spectroscopy

EMSL research Ravi Kukkadapu recently received two international honors in the Mössbauer spectroscopy community. At the International Conference on the Applications of the Mössbauer Effect in Vienna, Austria, he was featured as an emerging leader in the Mössbauer community. He received this honor from distinguished Professor John Stevens, Director of the Mossbauer Effect Data Center, a research institute at the University of North Carolina.

In addition, Kukkadapu was invited to give a keynote talk at the upcoming Clay Minerals Group of the Mineralogical Society in the United Kingdom. At this annual conference, he will discuss the effect of iron-mineral (bio)transformations on remediating contaminated aquifers that contain radioactive metals such uranium, technetium, and plutonium. Contaminated aquifers, which can occur during nuclear material production and weapons development, are a problem worldwide.

At the Department of Energy's EMSL, Kukkadapu oversees the facility's 57Fe-Mössbauer spectrometers. These instruments are 57Fe-specific and provide information, such as valence state, coordination geometries, and magnetic hyperfine interactions, on iron-containing materials.

His work focuses on how (bio)transformation of iron-minerals present in the subsurface impact radioactive metal remediation under different biogeochemical conditions. This data will provide insights necessary to develop biogeochemical models for long-term monitoring of contaminated aquifers. He is also active in a number of other projects funded by DOE's Environmental Remediation Sciences Program.

In the last few years, he has written or co-written more than 35 papers on research done on the Mössbauer instruments for high-impact environmental journals. He is a frequently requested speaker at conferences and seminars.  (Posted 7/1/2009)

FAIMS

First Book on FAIMS Published by PNNL Scientist Alexandre A. Shvartsburg

Field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry explored in CRC Press publication

Though it may never reach the New York Times' bestseller list, a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory scientist's book on an analytical technology for complex mixtures is making an impact on spectrometry research.

Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry: Nonlinear Ion Transport and Fundamentals of FAIMS by PNNL chemist Dr. Alexandre Shvartsburg is the first book on field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry, or FAIMS. This relatively new technique is, in several important aspects, superior to conventional ion mobility spectrometry.

Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is used to separate, identify, and characterize ions based on their gas-phase transport in electric field. Conventional IMS has been used since the 1970s, originally to detect atmospheric vapor traces. Current applications extend from homeland security, national defense, and forensics to environmental monitoring and quality control in industry to analyses of biological materials, and medical diagnostics.

In conventional IMS, ions are separated by their absolute mobility. FAIMS, developed in Russia in the 1980s, sorts ions based on the difference between their mobility at high and low field intensities. This renders FAIMS separations quite independent of both conventional IMS and mass spectrometry and has made FAIMS/MS and FAIMS/IMS hybrids into powerful platforms for complex sample analyses.

Shvartsburg is an accomplished researcher and developer of ion mobility-based methods and instrumentation, including both conventional IMS and FAIMS. However, even having authored many scientific papers in the field, he found that writing this book deepened his understanding.

"My father liked to quote his senior colleague, (Nobel Laureate) Lev Landau, who said, ‘If you don't understand something, write a book about it. This has proven to be true for me, at least," said Shvartsburg.

"When writing a book, especially the first-ever one in a field, you have to start from the foundations. Once you probe them in depth, you realize that a lot of key assumptions have never really been questioned, proved, or disproved. I needed to re-learn things from the first principles to understand FAIMS in a way that could be well communicated to a broader audience than that of a specialized journal. In that process, I've found out that some major concepts accepted in the IMS field were actually incorrect."

Shvartsburg's book, published by CRC Press and available from Amazon, relates the fundamentals of FAIMS and other nonlinear IMS methods to the physics of gas-phase ion transport. It supplies the foundation to understand the new technology of nonlinear IMS methods.

Reference: Shvartsburg AA. 2009. Differential Ion Mobility Spectrometry: Nonlinear Ion Transport and Fundamentals of FAIMS. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL.

Background Highlight: Researchers Develop, Improve and Enhance Technologies for Rapid Analysis of Complex Samples.  (Posted 12/1/2009)

inventor

Jay Grate Named Battelle Distinguished Inventor

Congratulations to Dr. Jay Grate at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on being named a Battelle Distinguished Inventor.

This award is given to Battelle staff who have 14 or more U.S. patents to their credit as a result of their work at Battelle or Battelle-operated national laboratories.

More info...  (Posted 12/1/2009)

speaker

Bill Weber Invited Speaker for National Academy of Sciences Committee

Dr. William Weber of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory spoke to the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Waste Forms Technology and Performance. With hundreds of nuclear reactors operating worldwide, disposing of nuclear waste and used fuel is a growing issue. Weber spoke on the application of state-of-the-art computational methods to the design and performance of radionuclide-containing waste forms. Of specific interest was how the waste form behaved both during the initial cooling phase and over the thousands of years the waste would be stored.

Weber was asked to speak because of his internationally recognized expertise on waste forms, radiation effects, and the application of advanced computational methods to understanding material behavior. His research focuses on the radiation stability of nuclear waste materials, computer simulations, and the performance of materials in high-radiation environments. He currently leads a multidisciplinary, multi-institutional team studying defects and radiation effects in high-tech ceramics.

A Fellow of the Materials Research Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Weber has written extensively. He has authored or co-authored 5 book chapters and more than 480 publications. Many of these publications have been cited extensively. He is currently a principal editor and member of the editorial board for the Journal of Materials.  (Posted 12/1/2009)

NAE

Xiao-Dong Zhou invited to NAE's 2010 Indo-American Frontiers of Engineering Symposium

Xiao-Dong Zhou was invited by the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) to attend the 2010 Indo-American Frontiers of Engineering Symposium (IAFOE) to be held in March 2010 in Agra, India. The Indo-U.S. FOE brings together approximately 35 outstanding American and Indian engineers ages 30-45 from industry, universities, and other research institutions to discuss leading-edge research and technical work across a range of engineering fields. Participation is by invitation only.

Zhou is leading research on materials for energy conversion, including cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells and thermoelectric oxides. He has been principal investigator or co-principal investigator of several materials development programs related to energy science and technology, and thermoelectrics.

The Indo-U.S. FOE is a bilateral program held once every two years. It will facilitate an interdisciplinary transfer of knowledge and methodology that eventually could lead to collaborative networks of engineers from the two countries.  (Posted 11/1/2009)

lecturer

Carolyn Pearce Appointed Senior Lecturer at University of Manchester

Congratulations to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Dr. Carolyn Pearce on her appointment as an honorary senior lecturer at the University of Manchester, School of Earth, Atmospheric & Environmental Science. The school is one of the largest atmospheric and environmental academic research centers in Britain. Pearce, who came to the Laboratory in 2009, is investigating how minerals and microbes affect technetium and other radionuclides in the soil at a former plutonium production site in southeastern Washington State.

As a Research Councils UK academic fellow at Manchester, she investigated the microbial production of selenium-based nanomaterials linked to bioremediation strategies for selenium-contaminated soils. The appointment as senior lecturer recognizes Pearce for her outstanding value in geochemical research. The position offers her an opportunity to access resources at the University of Manchester and to continue supervision of graduate students.

As a Research Councils UK academic fellow at Manchester, she investigated the microbial production of selenium-based nanomaterials linked to bioremediation strategies for selenium-contaminated soils. The appointment as senior lecturer recognizes Pearce for her outstanding value in geochemical research. The position offers her an opportunity to access resources at the University of Manchester and to continue supervision of graduate students.

Pearce has authored or co-authored 29 papers in a range of disciplines including geochemistry, mineralogy, biotechnology, and nanotechnology. She is the recipient of 33 peer-reviewed synchrotron radiation beamtime allocations. Pearce also has received access awards to Department of Energy facilities such as the Molecular Foundry at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Dr. Pearce received academic development accreditation from The Higher Education Academy, UK.  (Posted 11/1/2009)

Xiao-Dong Zhou invited to NAE's 2010 Indo-American Frontiers of Engineering Symposium

Xiao-Dong Zhou was invited by the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) to attend the 2010 Indo-American Frontiers of Engineering Symposium (IAFOE) to be held in March 2010 in Agra, India. The Indo-U.S. FOE brings together approximately 35 outstanding American and Indian engineers ages 30-45 from industry, universities, and other research institutions to discuss leading-edge research and technical work across a range of engineering fields. Participation is by invitation only.

Zhou is leading research on materials for energy conversion, including cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells and thermoelectric oxides. He has been principal investigator or co-principal investigator of several materials development programs related to energy science and technology, and thermoelectrics. The Indo-U.S. FOE is a bilateral program held once every two years. It will facilitate an interdisciplinary transfer of knowledge and methodology that eventually could lead to collaborative networks of engineers from the two countries.  (Posted 11/1/2009)

usability

Frank Greitzer Invited to Present at National Academies Workshop on Usability, Security, and Privacy of Computer Systems

Frank Greitzer, NSD, was invited to be one of six "provocateurs," selected internationally by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), to participate in planning of, and present to a National Academies workshop on Usability, Security, and Privacy of Computer Systems Workshop held July 20-22, 2009 in Washington D.C. The workshop was organized by the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) of the National Research Council of the National Academies.

The aim of the presentations was to offer provocative or even controversial topics and out-of-the box thinking to stimulate ideas and discussion at the workshop and to help identify future research agendas for participating organizations and government stakeholders. Frank's contribution was discussion and presentation material on insider threat modeling, human factors/usability research methodology and metrics, and thoughts on privacy/security considerations relating to human interaction in virtual worlds.

At PNNL, Frank leads a R&D focus area of Cognitive Informatics that addresses human factors and social/behavioral science challenges through modeling and advanced engineering/computing approaches. With over 30 years of applied research and development experience in cognitive psychology, human information processing, and user-centered design, his research interests include modeling human behavior with application to identifying and predicting malicious insider cyber activities, modeling socio-cultural factors as predictors of terrorist activities, and human information interaction concepts for enhancing decision making in domains such as intelligence analysis or electric power grid operations. In the area of cyber security, Frank serves as a science advisor for PNNL's Information and Infrastructure Integrity Initiative.

In addition to his work at PNNL, Frank serves as an adjunct faculty member at Washington State University, Tri-Cities campus, where he teaches courses for the computer science department (interaction design) and for the psychology department (human factors). He also is a member of the Editorial Board of the Journal of Cognitive Informatics & Natural Intelligence.

The National Academies CSTB was established in 1986 to provide independent advice to the federal government on technical and public policy issues relating to computing and communications. It is composed of leaders in the information technology and complementary fields from industry and academia. CSTB conducts studies of critical national issues that recommend actions or changes in actions by government, industry, academic researchers and the larger nonprofit sector. CSTB also provides a neutral meeting ground for consideration of complex issues where resolution and action may be premature.  (Posted 7/1/2009)

handbook

Jason Zhang Invited to write a chapter for the Handbook of Battery Materials

Congratulations to Jason Zhang on being invited to write a chapter for the Handbook of Battery Materials. This second edition is being published by Wiley-VCH. Zhang's 20-page chapter will focus on recent findings in metal air batteries and will illustrate the technology, barriers, and potential of such devices.

Zhang was selected because of his expertise in lithium batteries. Through PNNL's Transformational Materials Science Initiative, he studies nanostructured materials for energy storage, especially for transportation and portable electronics applications. His work and willingness to share it with the scientific community will advance the frontiers of nanostructured electrochemically active materials in energy storage devices.  (Posted 7/1/2009)

frontiers

Marvin Warner Selected to Attend the 2009 U.S. Frontiers of Engineering Symposium

Marvin Warner was one of the 88 engineers selected to take part in the National Academy of Engineering's (NAE) 15th annual U.S. Frontiers of Engineering symposium. The participants–from industry, academia, and government–were nominated by fellow engineers or organizations and chosen from approximately 240 applicants.

"In today's challenging economic times, we look more than ever toward our engineering innovators," said NAE President Charles M. Vest. "The U.S. Frontiers of Engineering program brings together a diverse group of this country's most promising young engineers and gives them a forum to discuss multidisciplinary ways of addressing the issues that will carry us into tomorrow's economy."

Marvin's expertise lies in the chemistry and engineering of nanomaterials for applications ranging from detection and environmental remediation to national security challenges. His research is interdisciplinary in nature, and he has demonstrated success in developing business, leading interdisciplinary teams, and establishing collaborations with scientists outside PNNL. He has 18 peer-reviewed publications, 3 book chapters and 2 patents, all related to the development and application of nanomaterials to solve challenging problems in energy, the environment, and national security.

The symposium will be held September 10-12 at the National Academy's Beckman Center at the University of California, Irvine, and will examine engineering tools for scientific discovery; engineering the health care delivery system; nano/micro photonics and new applications; and resilient and sustainable infrastructures.  (Posted 6/1/2009)

book

Jim Amonette Writes Chapter in New Biochar Book

Jim Amonette wrote a chapter in a new book that is likely to become the definitive reference work on biochar. Published in March, Biochar for Environmental Management is the first book to bring together the expanding research literature on the potential environmental applications of biochar. The material biochar is a form of charcoal that is produced when biomass is burned under low-oxygen conditions to release energy. The book's interdisciplinary approach covers engineering, environmental sciences, agricultural sciences, economics, and policy aspects.

The book's editors selected Amonette to write the chapter entitled "Characteristics of Biochar: Microchemical Properties" because of his reputation as a soil mineralogist and chemist, his interest in soil-carbon sequestration, and his current research in the characterization and usage of biochar. Amonette's chapter focuses on the chemical makeup of biochar at the microscopic and molecular scale.

Generation and storage of biochar in soil may offer a long-term soil-based solution to the global climate change problem. The process transforms the biological matter into a more stable form of carbon, slowing the release cycle and thereby keeping more carbon out of the atmosphere. Amonette's work focuses on what happens when the biochar is added to soil. "The potential for biochar to permanently sequester atmospheric carbon is on the order of a billion tons per year, if sustainable practices are used," said Amonette.

Amonette has 29 plus years of research experience and has been with PNNL since 1986. He has authored or co-authored 57 plus peer-reviewed scientific journal publications, 20 book chapters, 40 technical reports, and 6 patents.  (Posted 6/1/2009)

PNNL's Tony Janetos Co-authors White House Climate Report

Tony Janetos at the White House Press Conference
Dr. Tony Janetos speaks at the White House news conference about climate change impacts in the United States. At left is Dr. Katharine Hayhoe from Texas Tech University and ATMOS Research & Consulting; at right is Dr. Jerry Melillo from the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

PNNL scientist Anthony Janetos was a key spokesperson at a White House news conference announcing the release of a major new climate change assessment on June 16, 2009. "Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States" summarizes current climate change science and projects regional and national consequences of the changing environment. It also discusses some of the actions society can take to respond to the climate challenge.

The White House Office of Science and Technology, which released the 200-page report, called it the "most comprehensive, authoritative report on global climate change impacts in the United States." The purpose of the report is to increase understanding of climate change and to provide a framework for decision making. The report received widespread media coverage, including from the Associated Press, The New York Times, the Washington Post, Time magazine, National Public Radio, numerous climate change blogs, and Twitter.

Janetos directs the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a partnership between PNNL and the University of Maryland. He wrote the ecosystems section and served on the author team for the full report. The ecosystems chapter concludes that, "Human-induced climate change, in conjunction with other stresses, is exerting major influences on natural environments and biodiversity, and these influences are generally expected to grow with increased warming." Ecosystem impacts include changes in basic processes such as photosynthesis; large-scale shifts in the distribution of plants and animals; and increased threats from fire, pests and disease. These effects are occurring now and are likely to grow, especially in desert, coastal, and arctic environments.

Why it matters: "The most important thing in this report is that the impacts of climate change are not something your children might theoretically see 50 years from now," Janetos told reporters during the news conference. "The thing that concerns me the most is that we have a whole host of impacts that we now observe in the natural world that are occurring sooner and more rapidly and that appear to be larger than we might have expected 10 years ago. If anything, we might have underestimated the rate and the impact of changes in the climate system."

Method: The report summarizes an extensive body of scientific information in layperson-friendly language. The authors drew primarily from 21 synthesis and assessment reports of the U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP).

The USGCRP is a 13-agency group that includes the Department of Energy. PNNL's atmospheric scientists and other researchers contributed to several USGCRP climate studies cited in the report. Also included were other peer-reviewed assessments and research, as well as government statistics, publicly available observations, and advice from expert reviewers.

What's next: This work is part of PNNL's quest to transform the Nation's ability to predict climate change and its impacts. Janetos is now working on expanding the JGCRI's research agenda on integrated assessment to include more sophistication on climate impacts and adaptation. The Global Change Research Act of 1990 requires the USGCRP to conduct an assessment of the impacts of global change in the United States at least every four years.

Acknowledgments: Janetos' work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research, as part of the U.S. Global Change Research Program.

Research team: In addition to Janetos, the report was authored by 30 people from Federal agencies, universities, national laboratories, and other research institutions.

Reference: Thomas R. Karl, Jerry M. Melillo, and Thomas C. Peterson (eds.) 2009. "Global Climate Change Impacts in the United States." Cambridge University Press, New York.  (Posted 6/1/2009)

David Atkinson Vice Chair of Gordon Research Conference Entitled: "Detecting Illicit Substances: Explosives and Drugs"

PNNL's leadership role in explosives technology became evident once again when David Atkinson, a research scientist in the Chemical and Biological Sciences group at PNNL served as vice-chair of the Gordon Research Conference entitled: "Detecting Illicit Substances: Explosives and Drugs" held in June 2009 in Les Diablerets, Switzerland. Because of the seminal nature of the research, the Gordon Conference is very highly regarded in the scientific community.  (Posted 6/1/2009)

electrochemical

Xiao-Dong Zhou Leads Organization of Important Symposium at Electrochemical Meeting

Dr. Xiao-Dong Zhou of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Transformational Materials Science Initiative is organizing a symposium on Advanced Materials and Concepts for Energy Harvesting. This high-visibility symposium will increase awareness of the grand challenges and emerging opportunities facing researchers seeking ways to more effectively generate and store electricity for applications such as hybrid automobiles.

Dr. Zhou was asked to organize the symposium because of his personal and leadership skills. At PNNL, he performs leading-edge research on cathodes for solid-oxide fuel cells, thermoelectric oxides, and nanocomponents for more effective solar cells.

For the symposium, Dr. Zhou has invited speakers, including twelve members of the National Academies, who will present discoveries at the frontier of high-temperature materials and of conversion and storage of energy, including fuel cells, solar cells, and batteries. Technical discussions will focus on which technologies are most promising for further study.

This event is part of the 215th meeting of the Electrochemical Society, which will take place in San Francisco, California, May 24-29, 2009.  (Posted 5/1/2009)

book

Yuehe Lin Co-Edits Nanotechnology Book

Yuehe Lin, a Laboratory Fellow at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, is a primary editor of the Handbook of Electrochemical Nanotechnology. Recently released by American Scientific Publishing, the two-volume set was written as a reference for researchers, students, and professors.

Cover of Handbook of Electrochemical Nanotechnology

Comprehensive and up-to-date, the books contain a total of 20 chapters written by leading researchers from academia and research institutes. The first volume contains an overview of this emerging field. The second volume explores potential applications, including nanoelectronics, sensors, and energy storage and conversion. In addition, the texts demonstrate that electrochemical nanotechnologies can solve significant technical barriers and potentially revolutionize research in emerging areas.

Lin was selected as primary editor based on his contributions to the fields of electrocatalysis, chemical sensors, biosensors, and biomedical nanotechnology. He has distinguished himself through his outstanding program development skills, his mentoring activities, and his publication excellence. Lin has authored more than 200 peer-reviewed publications and has more than 10 patents, half of which have been licensed to industrial partners for commercialization. Lin is a section editor of the Encyclopedia of Microfluidics and Nanofluidics. He also serves as editor and editorial advisory member of 18 international journals.  (Posted 5/1/2009)

lecturer

Tim Scheibe Chosen Darcy Distinguished Lecturer

Timothy D. (Tim) Scheibe has been selected as the 2010 Henry Darcy Distinguished Lecturer in Ground Water Science. Scheibe, a staff scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, was invited by the National Ground Water Research and Educational Foundation to spend next year lecturing at colleges and universities to educate and create interest in groundwater science and technology.

He will give lectures and meet with students and faculty at 30 to 50 host institutions across the United States and internationally. The lecture series has reached more than 70,000 students, faculty members, and professionals since 1987. Scheibe will offer each host institution the choice of two lectures:

  • Beyond the Black Box: Integrating Advanced Characterization of Microbial Processes with Subsurface Reactive Transport Models
  • Quantifying Flow and Reactive Transport in the Heterogeneous Subsurface Environment: From Pores to Porous Media and Facies to Aquifers.

Since joining PNNL in 1992, Scheibe's research has focused on characterizing and modeling natural subsurface heterogeneity and its impacts on contaminant transport in groundwater systems. Recently, he worked on subsurface biogeochemistry problems, including microbial transport in groundwater and bioremediation of metals and radionuclides. Scheibe is currently working on simulations of coupled flow, transport, and biogeochemical processes. Most of his research has been for the U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Remediation Sciences Program and its Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program.

The Darcy Lecture Series was established in 1986 in honor of Henry Darcy, a French engineer whose investigations established the physical basis on which groundwater hydrogeology has been studied since 1856. The National Ground Water Association is a nonprofit organization of more than 13,000 U.S. and international groundwater professionals.  (Posted 5/1/2009)

publication

Jason McDermott Plays Major Role in Book Publication

Jason McDermott played a leading role as primary editor of Computational Systems Biology . Recently published by Humana Press, the book was written for molecular and cellular biologists, bioinformaticians, and geneticists.

Comprehensive and up-to-date, Computational Systems Biology serves to motivate and inspire all those who wish to develop a complete description of a biological system. In the book, expert investigators contribute chapters which bring together biological data and computational and/or mathematical models of the data to aid researchers striving to create a system that provides both predictive and mechanistic information for a model organism.

The volume is organized into five major sections involving network components, network inference, network dynamics, function and evolutionary system biology, and computational infrastructure for systems biology. More info...

McDermott, along with Computational Sciences & Mathematics Division's Haluk Resat, Ron Taylor, and Mudita Singhal, all contributed to several chapters in the book, as well.  (Posted 4/1/2009)

russian

Julia Laskin Honored in Prestigious Russian Journal

Julia Laskin was honored in Mass-Spectrometria, a prestigious Russian mass spectrometry journal. The tribute honored Laskin's 2008 Biemann Medal given for outstanding achievement in mass spectrometry by a young scientist.

Dr. Jean Futrell, a renowned expert in mass spectrometry, wrote the tribute, which can be found in volume 5, issue 4 of the journal. Futrell honored Laskin for her internationally recognized contributions to mass spectrometry, ion chemistry, and ion surface reactions. Her research in these areas provides an important background for the development of new analytical approaches in tandem mass spectrometry.

Laskin also is actively involved in building the next generation of scientists. She hosts and advises visiting scientists and graduate students from U.S. and foreign universities at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a DOE national user facility at PNNL. Also, Laskin mentors post-doctoral fellows and undergraduate summer interns. She has authored or co-authored more than 70 peer-reviewed articles.  (Posted 3/1/2009)

peking

Yanwen Zhang to Serve as Guest Professor at Peking University

EMSL researcher Yanwen Zhang has accepted an invitation to serve a two-year term as Guest Professor of Peking University. In this capacity, she will monitor Ph.D. students at EMSL who are mainly supported by the Chinese government and help strengthen materials research at the university, until March 2011. Zhang will visit Peking University approximately twice yearly, and the university professors, researchers and students will also visit EMSL as part of the collaboration.

The invitation was extended by Professor J. F. Zhou, the President of Peking University.

At EMSL, Zhang leads materials analysis and modification research projects in the ion accelerator laboratory. Her work covers topics such as single ion impact, nanoscale defect engineering, ion/electron-solid interaction, radiation detector physics, ion-beam modification and synthesis of materials, electrochemical oxidation of nuclear reactor fuel cladding, and application of ion-beam analysis techniques. Because of her research and experience, Zhang has participated in prestigious symposiums, including the 2008 German-American Frontiers of Engineering Symposium and the 14th Annual German-American Kavli Frontiers of Science Symposium. Also, she has won several awards, including the 2005 Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers and the docent title from the Lund University in Sweden. With her collaborators around the world, she has written or co-written more than 120 journal articles.  (Posted 3/1/2009)

NASA

Bill Morgan Named Scientific Director of NASA Summer School

Bill Morgan has been named Scientific Director of the 2009 National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space Radiation Summer School (NSRSS). The school, which is held at Brookhaven National Laboratory, June 1-20, offers graduate students, postdoctoral fellows and junior faculty the opportunity to learn about the unique characteristics of space radiation and how to perform experiments exposing targets to high-energy, high-charge particles. The NSRSS was designed to provide a pipeline of researchers to tackle the challenges of harmful radiation exposure to humans traveling on space exploration missions.

Morgan, who is Director of Radiation Biology and Biophysics at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, will select and invite lecturers, coordinate the courses, and ensure attendees learn all the chemistry, physics and biology of radiations commonly encountered in space. He is also featured in the NASA Space Radiation Program Winter 2008/2009 Newsletter Space Radiation Spotlight on William F. Morgan.

Morgan is a leading researcher in the fields of radiation biology and the long-term biological effects of radiation exposure. He leads PNNL's Low Dose Program, which is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research. Morgan is a scientific representative for regulatory agencies such as the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, the International Commission on Radiological Protection, the National Council for Radiation Protection and the Environmental Protection Agency's Science Advisory Board Radiation Advisory Committee.  (Posted 2/1/2009)

Changing Paradigm of Data-Intensive Computing Makes Journal Cover

A PNNL-authored article by Richard Kouzes, Gordon Anderson, Stephen Elbert, Ian Gorton, and Deb Gracio on the Changing Paradigm of Data-Intensive Computing was selected as the cover feature for the January IEEE Computer Society journal.

The article describes PNNL's leading-edge research to develop new classes of software, algorithms and hardware to provide timely and meaningful analytical results from an exponentially growing tidal wave of complex scientific, energy, environmental and national security related data in the new information-dominated age.  (Posted 1/1/2009)

america

Wayne Martin Recognized as One of America's 2008 Most Accomplished African American Engineers

Wayne Martin has been recognized as one of America's 2008 most accomplished African American engineers by the Black Equal Opportunity Employment Journal.

Over the past 30 years, Wayne has served as a environmental scientist and program manager for technology development for complex environmental problems and conducted an extensive array of experiments related to the study of contaminant migration in the subsurface using numerous analytical instruments. He has worked predominantly on national problems associated with hazardous waste management, although he has had international involvement with the International Atomic Energy Association working with an international committee for developing procedures for radioactive tracer techniques and studies in understanding contaminant migration mechanisms and problems. These approaches are instrumental in the investigation and identification of the environmental fate of radioactive and inorganic species in the subsurface.

His recognition also includes his efforts to increase involvement of under-represented minorities in the engineering and scientific fields and for his leadership and significant contributions to the Tri-Cities community.  (Posted 1/1/2009)

 

2008 Awards

runyon

Larry Runyon Receives Deputy Director's Award for Individual Excellence from DOE Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence

Larry Runyon received the Deputy Director's Award for Individual Excellence at the second annual DOE Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence Award Program April 30, 2008, in Washington, D.C. Larry was recognized for his outstanding performance in executing his responsibilities as the Deputy Senior Counterintelligence Officer for the PNNL Counterintelligence Program, and in particular, for his diligence, aggressiveness, thoroughness and overall professionalism demonstrated during his investigation of two high-profile cases of national impact that ultimately became models for the entire DOE counterintelligence community.

Larry's efforts over the last six-plus years investigating the two unique, complex and high-profile CI cases, and his ultimate application of the facts developed in those cases into a successful case study workshop were the basis for the award  (Posted 5/1/2008)

honorary

Jerry Posakony named recipient of 2009 IEEE Honorary Membership

Jerry Posakony has been named the recipient of the 2009 IEEE Honorary Membership "for pioneering contributions in ultrasonic techniques for medical diagnosis and nondestructive evaluation."

Each year the IEEE Awards Board recommends a select group of recipients to receive the IEEE's most prestigious honors. As of Dec 2007 there were only 27 IEEE Honorary members worldwide out of more than 376,000 IEEE members.

The grade of Honorary Member is a significant honor bestowed by the Institute and is awarded for life to an individual. It was established through the Bylaws of the IEEE, with the following description: Honorary Members are elected by the Board of Directors from among those who have rendered meritorious service to humanity in the IEEE's designated fields of interest and who are not members of the IEEE.

Through its global membership, IEEE is a leading authority on areas ranging from aerospace systems, computers and telecommunications to biomedical engineering, electric power and consumer electronics among others.  (Posted 12/1/2008)

innovation

Bill Samuels Shares ACS Regional Industrial Innovation Award

A new technology that de-ices planes and airport runways and pavements with less impact to the environment has garnered its development team the Regional Industrial Innovation award from the American Chemical Society.

The technology – D3: Degradable by Design Deicer – was created by a team of scientists from Battelle and PNNL. D3 is a family of non-toxic biodegradable fluids used to remove and prevent the formation of snow and ice on aircraft, airport runways, roads and pavement. It also can prevent snow from sticking to deiced surfaces, providing additional protection.

The team members are Bill Samuels, Fundamental and Computation Sciences Directorate; and Satya Chauhan, Nicholas Conkle and Melissa Roshon, Battelle.

D3 was developed to be more environmentally friendly and is manufactured primarily from bio-based materials. The award-winning deicing — EcoFlo for aircraft deicing/anti-icing and Battelle-RDF for runway pavement deicing/anti-icing — substantially reduce toxicity levels and potential environmental damage as well as corrosion of aircraft materials while providing the same performance and benefits of other commercial deicing products.

The technology is available for use by the military and commercial airlines for aircraft and runway deicing and also is potentially available for consumer deicing products. The evaluation of these products for military use was partially funded by two Defense Department programs — Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program and Environmental Security Technology Certification Program. D3 also received a 2004 R&D 100 Award for aircraft deicing/anti-icing as well as a 2008 R&D 100 Award for runway deicing/anti-icing.

 (Posted 7/16/2008)

asme

Moe Khaleel Named Mechanical Engineer of the Year by ASME

Moe Khaleel, director of the Computational Sciences and Mathematics Division and a PNNL Fellow, received the "ASME Setting the Standard 2008 Mechanical Engineer of the Year award" from the Columbia Basin Section of ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers) International.

Khaleel was recognized for his leadership and contributions to computational engineering, specifically in increasing thermal efficiency of data centers, and fuel cell technologies. Khaleel's current research interests are tuned to world energy systems and the future role for fuel cell systems. He is the national coordinator for a program dealing with the modeling and simulation of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell as part of the Solid Energy Conversion Alliance. His work in this area is highly cited by the engineering and scientific communities.

As director of PNNL's Computational Sciences and Mathematics Division, Khaleel leads the effort to provide scientific and technological solutions through the integration of high-performance computing, data-intensive computing, computational sciences, mathematics, scalable data management, and bioinformatics to advance the Laboratory's mission areas.

 (Posted 7/1/2008)

verugo

PNNL's Lu Verdugo selected top mentor in the country

Lu Verdugo received the inaugural National Mentor Award at The International Association of Office Professionals (IAAP) annual meeting in New Orleans on July 30. The award was sponsored by Adecco, a national personnel recruiting firm. The Mentor Award recognizes the top administrative professional who is willing to share their time and talents with their colleagues. Lu was honored based on the mentoring program she created and implemented among administrative staff in the Physical and Chemical Sciences Division as well as for her mentoring activities with staff lab-wide. Her accomplishments were judged best in the country by the panel which received 275 nominations. She is the lead administrator for the Physical and Chemical Sciences Division of the National Security Directorate and was this year's recipient of the Laboratory Director's Award of Administrative Excellence and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Administrator of the Year.  (Posted 7/1/2008)

ASHRAE

Michael Brambley Receives ASHRAE Distinguished Service Award

Michael Brambley received the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers Distinguished Service Award. The award salutes members for giving freely of their time and talent to the Society.  (Posted 6/1/2008)

laskin

Julia Laskin Awarded Biemann Medal for Achievements in Mass Spectrometry

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory chemist Julia Laskin has received the Biemann Medal, the highest honor granted to a young scientist by the American Society for Mass Spectrometry. Laskin accepted the award at the ASMS annual conference June 3 in Denver, where she also delivered a lecture on her research to the nearly 7,000 scientists attending the conference.

The international award recognizes Laskin's contributions to better understanding the activation, fragmentation and deposition of large molecules when they collide with surfaces. Her research is of interest to the broad scientific community and directly advances Department of Energy goals to develop biomaterials and biological processes for clean energy production, as well as to create biologically inspired systems, novel catalysts and biosensors. Other findings by Laskin and her collaborators provide fundamental insights into the analysis of complex molecules present in biofuels, petroleum and aerosols.

"Julia is a leader whose research is expanding the frontiers of science and contributing to vital DOE missions in energy, environment and national security," Laboratory Director Mike Kluse said. "Her accomplishments exemplify the dedication and impact of our outstanding young scientists."

Laskin also received the Department of Energy's Office of Science Early Career Scientist and Engineer and the Presidential Early Career Achievement Award in fall 2007.

Laskin earned a master's degree in physics from the Physico-Mechanical Division of the Leningrad Polytechnical Institute in Russia in 1990, and a doctorate in physical chemistry from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel in 1998. She joined PNNL as a postdoctoral research associate in 2000 and earned the laboratory's M.T. Thomas Award for outstanding postdoctoral achievement in 2002. She is now a chief scientist.

Laskin's work is funded by DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences and takes place at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a DOE scientific user facility at PNNL. EMSL is one of the world's foremost resources for mass spectrometry experts and instruments.  (Posted 6/1/2008)

bing

Bing Liu Receives 2008 Engineer of the Year Award from Washington Society of Professional Engineers

Bing Liu was named 2008 Engineer of the Year by the Washington Society of Professional Engineers. Bing was presented with this prestigious award at an Awards Banquet on February 22, 2008.

While nominations are submitted by the local chapters of professional societies such as ASHRAE, IEEE, and ASME, the Engineer of the Year Award is sponsored by the Washington Society of Professional Engineers. WSPE is a professional association, established in 1937, representing over 600 engineers from all fields of practice.

Bing, a senior research engineer, has focused her research primarily on the areas of Building and HVAC system energy efficiency, building energy use, and energy efficiency standards. Bing and her team have provided support through their analysis to DOE's decision making that will result in more stringent federal standards for packaged terminal air conditioners and heat pumps.  (Posted 2/1/2008)

sundaram

SK Sundaram Recognized for Contributions in Ceramics Field

SK Sundaram was honored with a "Profiles in Excellence" from the American Ceramics Society. This distinction spotlights division members who have been selected by their peers as a person of excellence.

SK, a Chief Materials Scientist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, is internationally recognized for interdisciplinary research in the areas of millimeter/THz wave technology, nanomaterials/toxicity, integrated infrared photonics, and materials in extreme environments.

He has won numerous awards and honors, including two R&D100 awards. SK has held visiting appointments at Harvard, MIT, and Princeton. As a AAAS Fellow, he was honored for his "leadership and innovative contributions to a diverse cross-section of materials sciences, particularly new tools for synthesis and characterization of novel materials, diagnostics, and nanomaterials."  (Posted 2/1/2008)

hirt_ieee

Evelyn Hirt Receives Distinguished Service Award for Excellence in Nanotechnology

Evelyn Hirt was presented with the 2008 Nanotechnology Council's Distinguished Service Award. Evelyn was recognized for her outstanding service for the benefit and advancement of the IEEE Nanotechnology Council.

The IEEE Nanotechnology Council is a multi-disciplinary group whose purpose is to advance and coordinate work in the field of Nanotechnology which is carried out throughout the IEEE in scientific, literary and educational areas. The Council supports the theory, design, and development of nanotechnology and its scientific, engineering, and industrial applications. Between 2001 and today, Evelyn has held over ten positions with the Council, making her an excellent choice for this honor. The award garners Evelyn a $1,000 honorarium and a commemorative plaque.

At PNNL, Evelyn is a Principle Professional and Engineer with subject matter expertise in systems (hardware, software and integration) and controls. She will be formally presented the award at the IEEE NANO 2008 conference to be held in Texas this August.  (Posted 2/1/2008)

pratt

Rob Pratt Receives IEEE Region 6 Northwest Area Outstanding Engineer Award

Rob Pratt received the IEEE Northwest Area Region 6 Outstanding Engineer Award. Rob received this award for his leadership in the Lab's Energy System Transformation Initiative which formed the DOE GridWise program.

IEEE is the world's leading professional association for the advancement of technology. This Award is designed to recognize IEEE members of Region 6 who have made outstanding contributions to their profession. It recognizes the development of new technical concepts, significant patents, development of new devices, development of applications, new designs, and significant cost reductions using known techniques.

Rob is a research scientist for Energy Technology Development. His leadership in the Lab's Energy System Transformation Initiative which formed the DOE GridWise program has also been instrumental in establishing the "smart grid" Movement, including smart grid legislation in the recent federal energy bill. Rob has also made significant contributions to the Grid-Friendly Appliance effort, the Pacific Northwest GridWise Demo, and the Energy Infrastructure which have all helped to advance electrical engineering in the region.  (Posted 1/1/2008)

star

Wei-Jun Qian Named "Rising Star" by Genome Technology

Dr. Wei-Jun Qian is one of 30 "rising young stars" named by Genome Technology magazine in its third annual "Tomorrow's PIs" special edition. The magazine offers readers a chance to see large-scale biological research through the eyes of some of the best and the brightest young scientists who are poised to make significant contributions to their areas of interest.

Qian, a senior scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, is an expert in the rapidly growing field of proteomics—the study of proteins. He was chosen because of his contributions toward the development and application of innovative techniques that have enabled large-scale, quantitative investigations of proteins in challenging clinical samples.

His current research involves developing and applying novel mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches for quantifying changes in proteins from mammalian cells, tissues, and biofluids. This work is helping the scientific community gain a better understanding of cell signaling and discovering novel mechanistic or diagnostic protein biomarkers for human diseases. Qian has authored or co-authored 57 peer-reviewed publications and three book chapters.

The young investigators were nominated by scientists who are established leaders in the field today. Dr. Richard D. Smith, PNNL's chief scientist for proteomics and Battelle Fellow, nominated Qian. An interview with Qian entitled "Step by Step, a Better Mass Spec" appears in the December 2008/January 2009 issue of Genome Technology.  (Posted 12/1/2008)

Alumnus

Kevin Rosso named Virginia Tech Collefge of Science's Outstanding Alumnus

Kevin Rosso was honored by Virginia Tech for his outstanding research and contributions to the scientific community. Each year the university's alumni association selects, from each academic college, a gifted person who has graduated in the past decade. Rosso received the award from the College of Science, where he earned a doctoral degree in geochemistry in 1998. As a user of EMSL, Rosso leads internationally recognized research in environmental spectroscopy and biogeochemistry. He is an expert in mineral-water interface geochemistry, combining scanning probe microscopy and ab initio molecular modeling. He is known for his insightful models of electron transfer kinetics in environmental systems. His recent studies illuminate the relationship between bacteria and environmental metals, such as iron and uranium.  (Posted 12/1/2008)

PNNL Researchers Earned Top Honors at SuperComputing Conference

Christopher Oehmen, Lee Ann McCue, Bobbie-Jo Webb-Robertson, Scott Dowson, Justin Almquist, Jason McDermott, and Chandrika Sivaramakrishnan won this year's SuperComputing (SC08) HPC Analytics Challenge. The Analytics Challenge encourages innovative and sophisticated analysis and visualization techniques in a meaningful application that supports the discovery of knowledge. This high-visibility venue provides a great opportunity to showcase PNNL's leadership in data-intensive computing, scientific visualization, and HPC scientific applications "Our entire team is thrilled that we won, "Oehmen said, who led the winning team. "It's an honor to be a part of this international competition. We could not have completed the challenge without the support of our sponsors at the Department of Energy, National Science foundation, and internal investments from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory."  (Posted 11/1/2008)

peace

Alan Waltar Receives World Nuclear Association (WNA) Award for "Distinguished Contribution to Peaceful Worldwide use of Nuclear Technology"

Alan was one of three individuals to receive the WNA Award on September 4th in London for his influence on and commitment to the value of nuclear technology.

He was honored for his "committed belief in nuclear technology, a strong and creative intelligence, a remarkable lack of ego, and a great generosity to his fellow man" according to the WNA Director General. Alan's long history in nuclear education was highlighted by his leadership at the WNU Summer Institute. At PNNL, Alan provides consult for various initiatives as a senior advisor.

The WNA Director General, John Ritch, described Alan as a "superlative educator of our future nuclear leaders" and an "educator to his bones...a charismatic inspiration."  (Posted 9/1/2008)

alumnus

Gary Spanner Named Outstanding Alumnus of the Year by CBC Foundation

Gary Spanner, Tech Deployment and Outreach Directorate, has been named the CBC 2008-2009 Outstanding Alumnus of the Year by the Columbia Basin College Foundation. Gary manages the PNNL Economic Development Office. Gary, who attended CBC in 1972 and 1973, received this award from the CBC Foundation board chairman, Don Paddock, Sept. 17 in front of more than 300 CBC faculty and staff. He was honored for his professional achievements, civic leadership, community service and support of the college.  (Posted 9/1/2008)

grove

Subhash Singhal receives the 2008 Grove Medal

Subhash Singhal received the 2008 Grove Medal for sustained advances in fuel cell technology. He accepted the honor at the Fuel Cells Science & Technology 2008 conference in Copenhagen, Denmark, where he gave the opening address. The medal commemorates Welsh judge, inventor and physicist Sir William Robert Grove, who created the first fuel cell in 1839. It is the fifth international award to recognize Subhash's contributions to fuel cell research. As a Battelle Fellow at PNNL, Subhash provides senior technical, managerial and commercialization leadership to the Lab's fuel cell program.  (Posted 8/1/2008)

immunology

EMSL researcher to receive International Immunology's Outstanding Merit Award

EMSL researcher Ljiljana Paša Toli? was among the authors of a paper that was selected to receive International Immunology's Outstanding Merit Award for the article of exceptional value for 2007. The paper is "Preferential Recognition of a Microbial Metabolite by Human V2V2 T Cells INTIMM-06-0286.R1" [19(5):657-673, published May 2007], authored by Kia-Joo Puan, Chenggang Jin, Hong Wang, Ghanashyam Sarikonda, Amy M. Raker, Hoi K. Lee, Megan I. Samuelson, Elisabeth Märker-Hermann, Ljiljana Paša Toli?, Edward Nieves, José-Luis Giner, Tomohisa Kuzuyama, and Craig T. Morita, the latter an EMSL user from the University of Iowa. The editors of the journal present this award in special recognition of the article deemed to exhibit the highest distinction in immunological research.  (Posted 7/1/2008)

gulfstream

Aircraft Operations Receive Gold Standard Recognition

A prestigious national award recognized the stellar safety program of PNNL research aircraft used around the world for atmospheric research. The federal Interagency Committee for Aviation Policy awarded its highest Gold Standard Certificate to the Department of Energy for PNNL's excellent safety and operations management of the Research Aircraft Facility. The award recognizes the three-decade record of Bob Hannigan and his team of John Hubbe, Bill Svancara, Dick Hone, Rich Barchet, Ruth Keefe, and Bev Johnson for safe operations of the G-1 aircraft at PNNL and other research aircraft worldwide under contract to PNNL.
More details  (Posted 7/1/2008)

wang

Yong Wang awarded 2008 Distinguished Alumni Award

In recognition of his outstanding career and tireless support to the School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Yong Wang, Energy and Environment Directorate, has been awarded the Washington State University 2008 Distinguished Alumni Award. Yong is an adjunct professor in chemical engineering and bioengineering at WSU and a guest professor at Tianjin University (China); Sichuan University; Dalian University of Technology; and Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics. He currently serves on the editorial board of Catalysis Today and the Journal of Nanomaterials and is the program committee chair for the American Chemical Society's Petroleum Division (2006-2008).

He has organized numerous international and national conferences and has more than 100 peer reviewed publications, more than 50 invited presentations, 52 issued U.S. patents, and two books focused on microreactor and process intensification.  (Posted 6/1/2008)

zhang_mt

Zhenrong Zhang Receives M.T. Thomas Award for Postdoctoral Research

A scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Dr. Zhenrong Zhang was selected as the 2007 recipient of the M.T. Thomas Award for Outstanding Postdoctoral Achievement. This award recognizes her breakthrough science regarding the reactions on the surface of titanium dioxide, TiO2(110), a promising material with applications in catalysis and other areas. These breakthroughs are the result of her refinements to experimental instrumentation, allowing atomic-level measurements.

The award, first presented in 1996, acknowledges outstanding accomplishments by postdoctoral fellows who conduct their research in the Department of Energy's Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility at PNNL.  (Posted 5/1/2008)

weller

Dick Weller Earns Honorary Professorship for International Scientific Collaboration

Dick Weller of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was awarded a diploma by the Scientific Council of the Institute of Veterinary Medicine in Veterinary Science in Kyiv, Ukraine, conferring upon him the title of "Honorary Professor of the Institute of Veterinary Medicine." Weller is only the second person ever to be so honored in the history of the Institute. Weller received the diploma while at the Institute to deliver an invited presentation, "Veterinary Oncology: A Short History."

Weller promotes scientific collaboration between PNNL and other U.S. institutes and supports veterinary education. Over the last five years, he also has worked closely with the Ukraine Academy of Agrarian Science, in particular with its major veterinary institutes—the Institute of Clinical and Experimental Medicine (in Kharkov) and the Institute of Veterinary Medicine (in Kyiv)—both educational centers as well as research and development (R&D) institutes.

Working with professional colleagues at each institute, Weller has helped determine how to upgrade their biosecurity and biosafety practices related to R&D conducted to improve ways to diagnose, treat, and control animal diseases that could affect food safety and pose a public health concern. He helped develop plans for how to manage and safely handle disease-causing organisms used when conducting research activities at the institutes. Together, they have developed proposals for different but related ways of improving biosecurity and biosafety practices such as the proper use of protective clothing, the proper use of biological safety cabinets, and changing work flow patterns to minimize the number of people coming in contact with potentially dangerous microorganisms.

Engaging with peers in the biological world to build bridges that will sustain common understanding and mutual respect over time has been particularly rewarding for Weller. "I listen as a scientific peer, because my personal and professional interest is in trying to help solve professional problems," he said. "We have laid the groundwork for trust and a dogged stewardship of what we think they [the Institutes] deserve to have done" in the interests of biosecurity and biosafety.  (Posted 4/1/2008)

kavli

Yanwen Zhang Invited to Attend Prestigious Kavli Symposium in Germany

A world-leading reputation for advancing the frontiers of materials science has landed a PNNL researcher a prestigious invitation to attend a renowned international science symposium. Yanwen Zhang, PNNL senior research scientist at EMSL, a DOE scientific user facility, has been selected to attend the 14th Annual German-American Kavli Frontiers of Science Symposium June 11-14, in Potsdam, Germany.

Zhang's research includes theoretical and experimental materials science and engineering. She works closely with computational scientists, biochemists and nuclear engineers worldwide to develop models that predict the performance of materials. For example, she led a project that is critical to research on materials science and radiation physics involving ion-solid interactions. The project developed a new capability to accurately measure ion-slowing processes in solids, leading to better predictions of ion-stopping. This capability is important for rapidly expanding applications in nuclear reactors, fusion technology, and radiation detection.

Author or co-author of more than 100 peer-reviewed journal articles and other publications, Zhang also has received several prestigious awards and fellowships, including a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.

The symposium is co-sponsored by the Alexander Von Humboldt Foundation and the U.S. National Academy of Science. It is designed to provide an overview of opportunities in a wide range of scientific disciplines and to enable future science leaders to build networking relationships with their colleagues. Since 1989, more than 100 past attendees have been elected to the National Academy of Science and eight have received Nobel Prizes. Additional information can be found at www.nasonline.org.  (Posted 3/1/2008)

Ron Walters receives National Intelligence Medal of Achievement

Ron Walters received the National Intelligence Medal of Achievement from the Director of National Intelligence. Ron was recognized for his extraordinary technical leadership as the architect of several groundbreaking efforts that have substantially increased the nation's ability to prepare for and respond to acts of bioterrorism and natural disease outbreaks.  (Posted 1/1/2008)

 

2008 Fellowships

Six PNNL scientists elected AAAS fellows

Scientific association honors researchers for advancements in chemistry, engineering, physics and atmospheric science.

Six scientists from the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Election as a fellow recognizes the researchers' exceptional efforts to advance science or its applications.

The PNNL honorees and the AAAS sections that elected them are Don Baer, physics; Michel Dupuis and Chuck Peden, chemistry; Cindy Bruckner-Lea and Yong Wang, engineering; and L. Ruby Leung, atmospheric and hydrospheric sciences. They join 28 PNNL researchers previously chosen as AAAS fellows.

Don Baer

Don Baer
Don Baer specializes in the use of spectroscopy and other advanced techniques to reveal the behavior of atoms and molecules at or near the surfaces of materials. AAAS honored him "for research and capability development that significantly advance molecular-level understanding of environmentally important interfacial processes relevant to nanoparticle reactivity, mineral dissolution and stress corrosion cracking."

Baer is a laboratory fellow and lead scientist for interfacial chemistry at EMSL, a DOE national scientific user facility located at PNNL. He also is an adjunct professor of physics at Washington State University, Tri-Cities, and an adjunct professor of chemistry at the University of Washington. He is a graduate of Carnegie Mellon University and received his doctorate from Cornell University.

Cindy Bruckner-Lea

Cindy Bruckner-Lea
Bruckner-Lea was recognized "for groundbreaking contributions to the field of bioengineering, particularly for development of biosensors and bioanalytical systems at the interfaces between chemistry, biology and engineering."

Bruckner-Lea manages PNNL's chemical and biological sciences group. Her research focuses on the development of biodetection systems for national security, environmental and medical applications. She earned her bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from the University of California, Davis, and her doctorate in bioengineering from the University of Utah.

Michel Dupuis

Michel Dupuis
Dupuis pioneered the use of information technology to address fundamental problems in chemical theory and research. The AAAS fellowship recognizes his "distinguished contributions to the fields of computational and theoretical chemistry, particularly for the development of electronic structure methods and computer codes for the simulation of molecular properties and reactivity."

Dupuis is a laboratory fellow and associate director in PNNL's Chemical and Materials Sciences Division. He completed his undergraduate work in engineering at Ecole Polytechnique in Paris and earned his doctorate in theoretical chemistry at the State University of New York, Buffalo.

Ruby Leung

Ruby Leung
Discovering unexpected impacts of climate change, such as changes in water resources in the United States and East Asia, has brought international recognition to Leung. AAAS honored her "for outstanding contributions to the development and application of regional climate models."

Leung is a laboratory fellow in the PNNL Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division. She holds a bachelor's degree in physics and statistics from the Chinese University of Hong Kong and a master's and doctorate in atmospheric science from Texas A&M University.

Chuck Peden

Chuck Peden
Peden is at the forefront of research to control emissions from diesel and other fuel-efficient engines. He was selected "for distinguished contributions to the fundamental understanding of catalyst materials and processes for vehicle emission control that have enabled the implementation of new technologies."

Peden is interim director of the laboratory's Institute for Interfacial Catalysis. Author of more than 200 peer-reviewed articles and presentations, Peden received his bachelor's degree in chemistry from California State University, Chico, and his master's degree and doctorate in physical chemistry from the University of California, Santa Barbara.

Yong Wang

Yong Wang
Wang was honored "for groundbreaking contributions to the fields of reaction engineering and catalysis innovations that enable novel approaches to process intensification in important energy areas." Holder of more than 100 issued and pending U.S. patents, Wang is an authority on the development of chemical processes to produce hydrogen for fuel cells and on the conversion of biomass into fuels and chemicals.

Wang is a laboratory fellow and associate director of the laboratory's Institute for Interfacial Catalysis. He earned bachelor's and master's degrees in chemical engineering from Chengdu University of Science and Technology, China, plus a master's degree and a doctorate from Washington State University. Wang is an adjunct professor of chemical engineering at WSU and recipient of the university's 2008 Alumni Achievement Award  (Posted 12/1/2008)

ACerS

John Vienna Elected ACerS Fellow

John Vienna, Energy & Environment Directorate, was named as Fellow in the American Ceramics Society. Dr. Vienna has published over 150 journal articles, conference papers and technical reports in materials science and its applications to waste management. He has performed independent research in basic waste form materials chemistry, nucleation and growth kinetics, waste form processing, and thermodynamics of multi-component, multi-phased waste forms. Dr. Vienna has developed waste forms for excess nuclear materials and wastes at several US and international nuclear waste sites.  (Posted 9/1/2008)

fellow

Greg Piepel Elected Fellow of the American Society for Quality

Greg Piepel, Lab Fellow of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Fellow of the American Statistical Association, was elected as a Fellow of the American update tblAward Society for Quality (ASQ) in recognition of his significant contributions to quality.

In September 2008, the Board of Directors of the ASQ elected Piepel a Fellow of the Society for his "outstanding contributions to the experimental design and analysis of mixture experiments; for important applications of statistics and quality to nuclear waste immobilization; and for service to the profession."

Greg has worked for over 30 years developing and applying statistical methods for mixture experiments. A mixture experiment involves mixing ingredients of an end-product in various percentages (which must sum to 100), and measuring properties of the end-products. Greg has developed and applied statistical methods for designing mixture experiments as well as understanding, modeling, and optimizing. Applications have included immobilization of nuclear waste in glass and grout, alloys and other materials, pharmaceuticals, and food. Greg is one of the top-two experts in statistical methods for mixture experiments, and has taught short courses in the topic for many years.

ASQ is a knowledge-based global community of quality experts, with nearly 85,000 members dedicated to the promotion and advancement of quality tools, principles, and practices in their workplaces and in their communities.  (Posted 9/1/2008)

pryor_hps

Kathy Pryor Recognized as Fellow by Health Physics Society

Kathy Pryor, a Chief Health Physicist at PNNL, was recognized as a 2008 Fellow by the Health Physics Society (HPS) committee. This prestigious recognition is designed to honor senior members of the Society who have made significant administrative, educational, and/or scientific contributions to the profession of health physics.

Kathy has been a member of HPS since 1980 and served the Society through her participation in numerous committees, as a Director and currently as Secretary. Kathy is a Certified Health Physicist and has also advanced the professionalism of Health Physics through her continuing work with the American Board of Health Physics and the American Academy of Health Physics  (Posted 5/1/2008)

weber_mrs

Bill Weber Elected Fellow of Materials Research Society

Bill Weber was selected as an inaugural Fellow in the Materials Research Society. This is the first year, since being founded in 1973, that the society has honored notable members for their contributions to advancing materials research. Weber received this honor for his "seminal contributions, leadership, mentoring and innovative research on defects, defect properties, ion-solid interactions, radiation effects and models of radiation damage processes in glasses and ceramics."

Weber's research is focused on the fundamental understanding and accurate modeling of the effects of atomic-level defects and radiation on ceramics. This research is essential for advancing electronic devices, developing radiation-tolerant materials for new nuclear power reactors, and addressing concerns regarding the stability of nuclear waste.

Because of his belief in sharing the results of his work with the broader scientific community, Weber has authored or co-authored more than 350 peer-reviewed publications and 50 technical reports, many of which have been cited extensively. For example, in the MRS Journal of Materials Research and MRS Bulletin, his 21 articles have earned more than 840 citations. Currently, he is finishing a 6-year stint as a principal editor and member of the editorial board on the Journal of Materials Research.

In addition to his research and publishing, Weber takes the time to mentor new scientists at PNNL. While reviewing papers and discussing comments is a painful chore to some, Weber enjoys the stimulating conversations and watching new scientists grow during their career.  (Posted 2/1/2008)

 

2008 Elected Positions and Offices

kay_committee

Bruce Kay Appointed to DOE Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Dr. Bruce D. Kay recently accepted appointment to the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee. This committee helps solve complex scientific and technical issues for Basic Energy Sciences, part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. Through BES, researchers expand the scientific foundations for energy technologies and understand and mitigate the environmental impacts of energy use.

As a part of the 25-member committee, composed of experts from academia, national laboratories, and other institutions, Kay will provide recommendations on research and facilities priorities, appropriate balance among scientific disciplines, and collaboration among research institutes and industries. Undersecretary for DOE's Office of Science Dr. Raymond Orbach selected Kay for this assignment.

Kay was chosen for his internationally recognized leadership in the chemical sciences. His research at PNNL examines condensed phase chemical kinetics and molecular dynamics aimed at gaining a detailed physical understanding of the molecular-level interactions responsible for phase transitions and catalytic chemical reactions. A Fellow of the American Physical Society, AVS: Science and Technology of Materials, Interfaces, and Processing, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Kay has written more than 120 journal articles and technical reports and given nearly 200 invited lectures at forums around the world  (Posted 2/1/2008)

IEEE

Evelyn Hirt voted 2009 president-elect for IEEE-USA

Evelyn Hirt has been voted 2009 president-elect for IEEE-USA. IEEE is the world's leading professional association dedicated to technological innovation and excellence for the benefit of humanity. Evelyn's work focuses on technology systems and controls that are applied to a broad range of research, development and deployment and management system activities.

Evelyn will begin her three-year term Jan. 1. She will serve one year as president-elect, one year as president and chief executive officer, and the final year as past president.

"It's a huge honor," Evelyn said. "I view this as the perfect opportunity to help raise general awareness of how math and science contribute to the overall success of the country."

Earlier this year, Evelyn received the 2008 IEEE Nanotechnology Council Distinguished Service Award in recognition of her outstanding service for the benefit and advancement of the council.  (Posted 12/1/2008)

catalysis

Yong Wang serves second term on editorial board of Catalysis Today

Yong Wang, Associate Director of the Institute for Interfacial Catalysis, has been invited to serve a second term on the Catalysis Today Editorial Board. Wang joined the board in 2005. He was recently invited by the journal's publisher, Elsevier, to continue the service due to his effort on editorial issues and encouraging his peers to publish in the journal.

A Laboratory Fellow at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Wang is active in the scientific community. He is the author or co-author of 100+ peer-reviewed publications and has 54 issued US patents. He served as co-editor of two books. Also, he is an Adjunct Professor of Chemical Engineering at Washington State University.  (Posted 12/1/2008)

ansi

Steven Baker Appointed Chair of ANSI N 13.6 Working Group

Steven Baker, Energy & Environment Directorate, was appointed chair of an American National Standards Institute Working Group. Baker is an accomplished Health and Safety Manager specializing in radiation protection support services with proven ability to direct technical operations and lead employees in support of company goals and vision. The working group will evaluate the current occupational radiation exposure records systems.  (Posted 10/1/2008)

western

Leonard Bond elected Director, IEEE Region 6 (Western USA)

Leonard Bond, Laboratory Fellow, National Security Directorate, has succeeded to the position of director, IEEE region 6 (Western USA). In this position he has leadership of the nearly 60,000 members of IEEE in 12 western states. He also serves as a director for IEEE (09-10), the world's largest technical society with near 400,000 members worldwide and on the board of directors for IEEE-USA, the U.S. IEEE Regions. Leonard began his two-year term as director on Jan. 1. Since his election, he already has served two years as director-elect and after his time on the board of director he will serve two years as past-director. "After 34 years of membership in IEEE it is an opportunity to give back to an organization which was invaluable in my career development. It is a real privilege and honor to be serving on the board of directors," Leonard said. "In 2009, which is the 125th anniversary of IEEE, I view this as an opportunity to increase awareness of the importance of science literacy and the role of technology in meeting global energy needs and addressing climate change challenges."  (Posted 10/1/2008)

robotics

Brian Hatchell elected to executive committee of American Nuclear Society Robotics and Remote Systems Division

Brian Hatchell was elected to the executive committee of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) Robotics and Remote Systems Division. During his three-year term Brian will attend executive committee meetings and will be the editor for the Division's newsletter. Brian has been a member of ANS since 1999 and was the technical program co-chair for the 9th Topical Meeting on Robotics and Remote Systems in 2001.  (Posted 10/1/2008)

Eric Nyberg selected as Editor of TMS proceedings "Magnesium Technology 2009"

Eric Nyberg has been selected as Editor of The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS) proceedings, "Magnesium Technology 2009." Eric was also elected as the 2009 Chairman for the TMS Lightweight Metals Division committee on Magnesium and organizer for the 2009 Magnesium Technology Symposium to be held in San Francisco next February. Eric is the U.S. Technical Committee chairman for a unique 3-country automotive project, "Magnesium Front End Research and Development," a D.O.E. funded collaboration between the U.S., China and Canada on developing enabling technolgies for a magnesium intensive front end vehicle.  (Posted 7/1/2008)

king_sec

David King Elected Secretary of ACS Division of Fuel Chemistry

David King of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was elected Secretary of the American Chemical Society's Division of Fuel Chemistry. This division of the world's largest scientific society helps the research community share results that promote efficient and environmentally acceptable fuel production and use.

As the Secretary, King will supervise elections for the division. The process currently involves mailing out hundreds of paper ballots, encouraging responses, and tallying the results, a time-consuming process he plans to modernize. In addition, he will take the minutes at meetings and will oversee various communication products.

His involvement in the division was a natural, given his catalysis research at PNNL. As part of PNNL's Institute for Interfacial Catalysis, King is the Executive Secretary for the annual advisory committee meeting for the Laboratory's Catalysis Initiative.

In addition, he is conducting research in producing hydrogen fuel from biomass, designing solid oxide fuel cells to use natural gas directly, and removing undesirable sulfur molecules from liquid and gaseous fuels. He provides technical leadership for PNNL's Energy Conversion Initiative, facilitating environmentally friendly coal gasification and coal combustion processes. Finally, he serves as team lead for catalysis science and application in the Hydrocarbon Processing Group of the Energy and Environment Directorate.

King's term began in the spring 2008 and lasts through spring 2010.  (Posted 5/1/2008)

Joel Pounds and Thomas Weber Appointed Committee Chairs for Society of Toxicology

Dr. Joel Pounds
Dr. Joel Pounds
Dr. Thomas Weber
Dr. Thomas Weber
Dr. Joel Pounds and Dr. Thomas Weber were recently appointed as committee chairs for the Society of Toxicology by Society president George Corcoran. The Society is the leading organization dedicated to creating a safer and healthier world by advancing the science of toxicology.

Pounds will serve as Chair of the Society's Research Funding in Toxicology Committee. This committee is charged to identify, formulate, and recommend strategies and mechanisms to the Council to increase conventional and alternative sources of funding for research and training in toxicology. Pounds' appointment is through 2011.

Pounds is director of the Center for Novel Biomarkers of Response at PNNL, which is funded by the National Institutes of Health. He also leads the Systems Toxicology of Nanomaterials focus area of PNNL's Environmental Biomarkers Initiative. Pounds' research has focused on the cellular and molecular toxicity of lead and other metals, metal-metal interaction, and mathematical modeling of the response to metal mixtures. His current research includes use of mass-spectrometry based proteomic and NMR-based metabonomic instrumentation for characterization of biological responses to environmental stressors including nanomaterials.

Weber will serve a 2-year term as Chairman of the Society's Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology Committee. The committee is charged with identifying and developing strategic conferences for the Society. He is a scientist within PNNL's Environmental Biomarkers Initiative and is actively engaged in research supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Dose Radiation Research Program. His work focuses on the intersection between effective wound healing and carcinogenesis with the long-term goal of identifying key regulatory steps that can be exploited to improve human health. Other research interests center on new frontiers in protein kinase regulation.  (Posted 4/1/2008)

thevuthasan

Theva Thevuthasan Appointed Chair of AVS Short Course Committee

Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory researcher Theva Thevuthasan was appointed Chair of the Short Course Executive Committee for AVS: Science and Technology of Materials, Interfaces, and Processing. Through this committee, the international society provides scientists, engineers, and technicians with classes in vacuum and equipment technology, materials and interface characterization, and materials processing.

A frequent volunteer and long—time mentor, Thevuthasan served on the Short Course Executive Committee for about 10 years in different capacities. As the committee chair, Thevuthasan ensures the quality of more than 60 courses, such as "Comprehensive Course on Surface Analysis" and "Fundamentals of Vacuum Technology."

During his 3-year appointment, Thevuthasan is eager to continue the society's work to increase short course participation, which began to decline in 2001 based on changes in the semiconductor business. He is leading the committee in developing four focused educational programs this year, based on input from potential and past students.

At EMSL, Thevuthasan is well known for his design and development of experimental instruments with new capabilities. He is a recognized leader and author in ion beam modification and analysis of oxide materials with applications in resolving energy and the environmental issues.  (Posted 2/1/2008)

baer

Baer Elected to Third Term as ASTM International Committee Chair

Don Baer, Laboratory Fellow and Lead Scientist for Interfacial Chemistry at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, was elected to a third term as Chair of the ASTM International Committee E42 on Surface Analysis. The committee has jurisdiction over some 25 standards for surface analysis methods and is one of 136 ASTM technical standards writing committees. He began serving the 2-year term—his final—on January 1.

Baer is internationally known for the application of surface analysis methods to examine corrosion processes and the reactive properties of oxide and mineral surfaces. Since joining the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory—on whose campus EMSL resides—he has specialized in the use of surface-sensitive techniques to study how the interactions of a material with its environment alter material properties. Much of his research has involved understanding the roles of surface impurities or contaminants in chemical reactivity, and his current work involves understanding the reaction properties and environmental variability of nanoparticles.

In addition to his EMSL role and research activities, Baer serves as the PNNL coordinator for a series of nanoscience and nanotechnology courses offered at the Laboratory. He is an Adjunct Professor of Physics at Washington State University; an Adjunct Professor of Chemistry at the University of Washington; and a member of the American Vacuum Society (Fellow), the American Chemical Society, the American Physical Society, the Electrochemical Society, and the ISO Technical Committee 201 on Surface Chemistry. He has served in a variety of leadership roles within those professional societies.

Baer has been a member of ASTM International since 1980. ASTM (originally known as the American Society for Testing and Materials) International is one of the largest standards development and delivery systems in the world. ASTM standards are accepted and used in research and development, product testing, quality systems, and commercial transactions around the globe.  (Posted 2/1/2008)

engelhard

Mark Engelhard Selected to Chair Publications Committee for AVS

Mark Engelhard, a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researcher in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, was appointed Publications Committee Chair for AVS: Science and Technology of Materials, Interfaces, and Processing. Founded in 1953, this international society was focused on vacuum science and technology, critical to developing vacuum tubes, enabling radio broadcasting, radar, and other technologies. Today, the society has broadened its scope to surface science, electronic and magnetic materials, nanoscience, biomaterials and other relevant areas.  (Posted 1/1/2008)

airborne

Jason Tomlinson to Lead Interagency Coordinating Committee for Airborne Geosciences Research and Application

Jason Tomlinson was appointed to lead the prestigious national group, Interagency Coordinating Committee for Airborne Geosciences Research and Application. The committee works to increase the effective use of the federal airborne fleet for geoscience research, including national and international field campaigns. The organization consists of federal agencies that sponsor aircraft and related instruments for geoscience research. Members include DOE, National Science Foundation, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Office of Naval Research, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and United States Geological Survey.  (Posted 12/1/2008)

regional

John McCoy elected vice president of regional network consortium

John McCoy was elected by the participants of the Northern Tier Network Consortium (NTNC) to serve as vice president. The NTNC is a regional initiative aimed at creating robust network connections for participating research institutions in the northwestern states. The goals of the NTNC and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are aligned in their focus to improve network connectivity through investments in regional optical networks. John's work with the consortium will ensure the alignment of PNNL's network implementation with NTNC's plans to create an integrated research and education network capability.

PNNL is proud of John's commitment to educational, research, and economic vitality of the Northern region through his appointment with NTNC.  (Posted 11/1/2008)

biometal

Dave Koppenaal to Serve on International Advisory Board for New Journal

David Koppenaal has been invited to serve a 3-year term on the International Advisory Board for the new journal Metallomics: Integrated biometal science. The journal is a Royal Society of Chemistry publication that will be launched in January 2009. Metallomics is the integrated study of metals and metal species and their interactions, transformations and functions in biological systems. The subject is receiving great attention as a new frontier in the investigation of trace elements in biology and is expected to develop as an interdisciplinary science complementary to metabolomics and proteomics.

Koppenaal is a Laboratory Fellow at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory who leads the Biological Separations and Mass Spectrometry Group within the Biological Sciences Division. His research has been principally focused on the development of atomic mass spectrometry for inorganic and isotopic characterization, and the demonstration of new analytical techniques and instruments for environmental, nuclear, non-proliferation and biological/health problems.

Koppenaal and co-workers at PNNL have pioneered the application of inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry as a powerful and relevant radioanalytical tool and demonstrated its use for radioactive waste characterization, ultra-trace nuclear forensics use and, most recently, metallomics applications.

His more than 75 publications include several invited review articles, and he is a frequent keynote and plenary lecturer at major conferences. Koppenaal recently completed a 7-year term as Editorial Board member for the RSC publication Journal of Analytical and Atomic Spectrometry. Koppenaal is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Royal Society of Chemistry and a member of the American Chemistry Society and the American Society for Mass Spectrometry.  (Posted 11/1/2008)

chemistry

Michael Dupuis Appointed to Journal of Physical Chemistry Advisory Board

Dr. Michel Dupuis has accepted an invitation to join the advisory board of the Journal of Physical Chemistry. As a member of this international board, Dupuis will consult with the board on questions about the journal's policy and future while continuing to referee manuscripts submitted to the journal.

Dupuis was selected for his more than 30 years of expertise in theoretical and computational chemistry, a field of research where he develops and applies theories, methods and computer algorithms to the study of chemical problems. His research deals with the electronic structure and reactivity of molecules, clusters, and materials involved in gas phase and condensed phase chemistry, catalysis, electrochemistry, and biochemistry.

In addition, Dupuis strongly supports the scientific community. He publishes extensively, having authored or co-authored 170+ journal articles. He lectures at many national and international conferences. Also, he routinely mentors college students and post-doctoral fellows and serves as adjunct faculty at Washington State University-Tri Cities.

Founded by the American Chemical Society in 1896, the Journal of Physical Chemistry was recently divided into three journals because of the growth in the field. The Journal of Physical Chemistry A covers experimental and theoretical research on the structure, dynamics, and spectroscopy of molecules and clusters. The Journal of Physical Chemistry B focuses on material chemistry, thermodynamics, and related fields. It is in the top 20 journals of the physical chemistry field. The newest journal, Journal of Physical Chemistry C, focuses on nanoscience. Each journal is published weekly.  (Posted 11/1/2008)

editor

Baer Named Reviews Editor for Journal

Don Baer was selected to serve as the Reviews Editor for Surface and Interface Analysis. This international, refereed journal is devoted to publishing papers on developing and applying techniques for characterizing surfaces, interfaces, and thin films. As the Reviews Editor, Baer will work with world-leading scientists to obtain articles on topics of interest to the journal's audience of materials scientists, physicists, physical chemists, and others. In addition to traditional review articles, he will encourage leading scientists to prepare perspectives on current research directions and technology advances and tutorial articles. At the Department of Energy's EMSL, Baer is the Lead Scientist for Interfacial Chemistry. He is internationally known for applying surface analysis methods to examine the reactive properties of oxides and mineral surfaces, determining behaviors of nanostructured materials, and understanding corrosion processes. He specializes in using surface sensitive techniques to study surface interphase reactions and materials surface chemistry. In the scientific community, Baer is in demand. He has authored or co-authored more than 200 peer-reviewed articles, edited books and special journal issues, and lectured at major conferences. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the AVS and a member of the American Physical Society and the Electrochemical Society, among others. He has served as an associate editor on Surface Science Spectra since 1991. In addition, he serves on the Surface and Interface Analysis publication's advisory board.  (Posted 10/1/2008)

ANSI

Steven C. Baker Appointed Chair of ANSI N 13.6 Working Group

Steven Baker was appointed chair of an American National Standards Institute Working Group. The group will evaluate the current occupational radiation exposure records systems.  (Posted 10/1/2008)

greenhouse

Jim Dooley Appointed Associate Editor of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Journal

Jim Dooley, a senior staff scientist with the Joint Global Change Research Institute, was named associate editor in October for the world's first peer-reviewed journal to cover carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies. The publication, the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, focuses on greenhouse gas abatement options with an emphasis on the power, manufacturing, and production industries. The journal covers issues associated with greenhouse gas mitigation, carbon dioxide capture and storage, alternative mitigation options, implementation case studies, and policy and economic assessments of these advanced energy systems. Elsevier publishes the journal.

Dooley was formerly a member of the editorial board for the journal since its inception in 2007. In his new role as associate editor, Dooley is responsible for ensuring that submitted papers meet scientific standards, coordinating reviews, and communicating with authors. He will cover papers related to integrated systems, economics, and economic modeling of systems related to carbon dioxide capture and storage and low-carbon energy systems.

At the Joint Global Change Research Institute, Dooley leads research related to the role of carbon dioxide capture and storage in addressing climate change. Dooley co-developed a state-of-the-art geographic information-based model for examining the large-scale deployment of carbon management technologies in the United States. Dooley and his research team have authored more than 100 technical reports and peer-reviewed articles on the role of technology and climate change. He was a significant contributor to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage, a 2005 landmark international scientific assessment on the role of carbon dioxide capture and storage in addressing climate change. The Joint Global Change Research Institute, in College Park, Maryland, is a partnership of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Maryland.  (Posted 10/1/2008)

ANSI

Steven Baker Appointed Chair of ANSI N 13.6 Working Group

Steven Baker, Energy & Environment Directorate, was appointed chair of an American National Standards Institute Working Group. Baker is an accomplished Health and Safety Manager specializing in radiation protection support services with proven ability to direct technical operations and lead employees in support of company goals and vision. The working group will evaluate the current occupational radiation exposure records systems.  (Posted 10/1/2008)

technology

Mike Schwenk appointed to board of directors for Washington Technology Center

Washington State Governor, Chris Gregoire, appointed Mike Schwenk, Director of Technology Deployment and Outreach, to the board of directors for the Washington Technology Center. The WTC is a statewide economic development organization focused on technology and innovation. The organization's board is comprised of business and academic leaders who serve as the governing arm of the state-charted agency, which promotes technology and innovation-based economic development throughout Washington. Mike will serve a three-year term. Mike has 30 years of technical and business management experience in government, non-profit and corporate settings. For the past ten years, he has championed numerous efforts that moved research out of the science laboratory and into the business community. His service on numerous regional and national boards and policy committees for government, industry and academia gives the Lab a leadership position in the national debate on how to collaborate across large research organizations.  (Posted 9/1/2008)

wiley

Steven Wiley appointed to Burroughs Wellcome Fund Advisory Committee

Steven Wiley, Lead Scientist for Biology at DOE's EMSL, was appointed to an advisory committee for the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, a private, philanthropic organization. The committee will evaluate applications for their Institutional Program Unifying Population and Laboratory-Based Sciences. This program was created to bridge the gap between population approaches to human health and basic biomedical research. The program provides grants of $500,000 per year for 5 years to stimulate graduate student training programs and to bring together scientists working in fundamental sciences as well as those in schools of medicine and public health.

As a member of the advisory committee, Wiley will evaluate and provide guidance on the directions and progress of the institutional program. This includes reviewing numerous grant proposals and attending conferences, such as an upcoming workshop on microbial systems in Denver, Colorado.

Wiley was appointed to the committee, a long-term commitment, because of his scientific and educational expertise in integrating molecular and systems biology, such as the research he is leading as Director of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Biomolecular Systems Initiative. In addition, he has experience in serving on advisory committees to the National Institutes of Health as well as university advisory committees at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Vanderbilt University.

 (Posted 7/1/2008)

toxicology

Katrina Waters Appointed to Editorial Board of Toxicology Journal

Dr. Katrina Waters, a senior research scientist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been appointed to the Editorial Board of Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology for a three-year term beginning July 1, 2008. The toxicology journal publishes original scientific research pertaining to action of chemicals, drugs, or natural products to animals or humans.

Dr. Waters is currently involved in the Systems Toxicology of Nanomaterials focus area of the Environmental Biomarkers Initiative and the PNNL Center for Novel Biomarkers of Response. Her research includes biosignature discovery from integrated microarray and proteomic data describing lung inflammation from nanoparticle exposure and environmental exposures, including disease susceptibility factors. Dr. Waters joined PNNL in 2004. Prior to that, she was a senior research biochemist in Molecular & Investigative Toxicology at Merck Research Labs in West Point, PA. (July 2008)

 (Posted 7/1/2008)

talanta

Yuehe Lin Named to Second Term on Advisory Board for Chemistry Journal Talanta

Dr. Yuehe Lin has been named to a second term on the advisory board of Talanta. This long-standing international scientific journal publishes original pure and applied analytical chemistry research. As a member of the board, Lin reviews submissions and advises the editors to accept, reject, or suggest changes to the submittals, driving high-quality results into the scientific literature.

Lin was asked to continue on the board because of his diligence, thoroughness, and expertise in nanotechnology, particularly in developing nanobioelectronic devices and nanomaterials for biomedical diagnosis and drug delivery. He is also known for developing microanalytical systems to perform environmental and biomedical analyses, and synthesizing nanoengineered catalysts for fuel cells as part of PNNL's Institute for Interfacial Catalysis and as a user at the Department of Energy's EMSL .

Lin has been actively serving on international scientific community for many years. After finishing his first term as the North American Editor of the Journal of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Lin continues to serve for the journal as an Associate Editor. Lin also serves on the editorial advisory boards of 15 other international journals.

 (Posted 7/1/2008)

metting

Blaine Metting Appointed to Fourth Term on Oregon Bioscience Association Board

Blaine Metting was appointed to a fourth term on the Oregon Bioscience Association's board of directors for 2008. In this role, Metting represents Battelle and shares responsibility for assessing regional research capabilities for the association. The Oregon Bioscience Association is a non-profit membership association supporting Oregon's bioscience industry.

Metting currently manages the Biological & Environmental Sciences Product Line and the Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate's 1831-contract business at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. He joined the Laboratory in 1990 as a Senior Research Scientist, and has been a program manager since 1993.  (Posted 5/1/2008)

stansbury

Paul Stansbury Elected President of the American Academy of Health Physics

Paul Stansbury has been elected president of the American Academy of Health Physics. AAHP advances the profession of Health Physics, encourages the highest standards of ethics and integrity in the practice of Health Physics, enhances communications among Certified Health Physicists and provides a means for active CHPs to participate in the certification program. As a scientist, Paul specializes in the assessment and mitigation of human health risks in the workplace and the environment.

His experience includes university, private enterprise, and national laboratory positions as a senior technical contributor, line manager, project manager, and professor. He currently is working on a project for U.S. Customs and Border Protection to install radiation portal monitors at all locations where people or materials may enter the country to detect the illicit import of radioactive or nuclear material.  (Posted 5/1/2008)

metz

Tom Metz Named to Proteomic Insights Editorial Board

Dr. Tom Metz has been appointed to the Editorial Board of Proteomic Insights, a new peer-reviewed journal published by Libertas Academica. According to a release from Dr. Hassan Dihazi, editor in chief, the journal covers all areas of proteomics including basic proteomic research; structural, functional, property, and interaction analysis of cellular systems, organelles, and protein complexes; and protein expression profiling for the discovery and validation of diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers.

Metz is a Senior Research Scientist for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; his areas of expertise include metabolomic methods' development and application to disease profiling in biological fluids and tissues, and non-enzymatic modification of tissue proteins by products of glucose and lipid oxidation. Metz began a post-doctorate tenure at PNNL in 2003; he joined PNNL in 2005.  (Posted 5/1/2008)

khaleel

Moe Khaleel Appointed to Editorial Board of Computers, Materials, & Continua

Congratulations to Moe Khaleel was recently appointed to the editorial board of Computers, Materials, & Continua. CMC publishes original research papers of reasonable permanent value in the areas of computational materials science and engineering, at various length scales (quantum, nano, micro, meso, macro) and various time scales (picoseconds to hours). Both structural as well as functional materials, composite materials, and inorganic as well as organic materials, are of interest. Papers which deal with computational modeling of the mechanics, physics, chemistry, and biology (and their interactions) of all modern materials are welcome. Papers that advance the paradigm of materials by design from the bottom up, and top-down, are strongly solicited.  (Posted 4/1/2008)

Subhash Singhal appointed to Executive Advisory Board

Subhash Singhal, Battelle Fellow and Director of Fuel Cells for PNNL's Energy and Environment Directorate, has been appointed an Executive Advisory Board Member of the Florida Institute for Sustainable Energy (FISE) at the University of Florida. FISE brings together the broad research capabilities at the University of Florida to address societal needs for a sustainable energy future. The institute's structure covers numerous units within the Colleges of Engineering, Business, Law, Building Construction, Liberal Arts and Sciences, School of Natural Resources, and the University Office of Sustainability. FISE provides the necessary umbrella organization to promote interdisciplinary research and education, and its facilities include the FISE Energy Technology Incubator to accelerate commercialization of energy technologies.  (Posted 2/1/2008)

 

2008 Impact on Scientific Community

Teeguarden

Justin Teeguarden on NRC Nanomaterial Report Committee

Justin Teeguarden is a member of a National Research Council committee that recently issued a widely publicized report describing serious weaknesses in the U.S. government's plan for research on the potential health and environmental risks posed by nanomaterials. The committee emphasized that an effective national plan for identifying and managing potential risks is essential to the successful development and public acceptance of nanotechnology-enabled products. Nanomaterials are increasingly being used in consumer goods and industry because their size (a nanometer is one-billionth of a meter) gives them unique physical, chemical and biological properties.

The report "Review of the Federal Strategy to Address Environmental, Health, and Safety Research Needs for Engineered Nanoscale Materials" was released December 10, 2008. Teeguarden, who leads research related to computational dosimetry of nanomaterials and health effects at PNNL, joined the committee in May 2008. He leads research related to computational dosimetry of nanomaterials and health effects and has a background in pharmacokinetics, including modeling and risk assessment.  (Posted 12/1/2008)

academy

Singhal Named Founding Member of Washington Science Academy

Subhash Singhal, a Battelle Fellow and fuel cell director at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been named one of 104 founding members of the Washington State Academy of Sciences.

WSAS, a non-profit organization created in 2005 by the state legislature, conducts commissioned studies and prepares scientific reports on issues of public importance. The studies assist with informing public policy-makers, facilitating new research initiatives, or providing program review and assessment. WSAS represents many academic disciplines and diverse industries, including aerospace, agriculture, computer science, energy, engineering, ecology and transportation.

"It is extremely important to provide scientific and technological analysis to help our state leaders make informed decisions on so many challenging issues," said Singhal, who as a founding member may submit nominees for election to the Academy.

Singhal is a world leader in solid oxide fuel cells. He provides senior technical, managerial and commercialization leadership to PNNL's fuel cell program. He joined the Laboratory in 2000 after nearly 30 years leading fuel cell development at Siemens Power Generation (formerly Westinghouse Electric Corporation).

Singhal received the 2008 Grove Medal for sustained advances in fuel cell technology. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of four professional societies: American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Ceramic Society, ASM International and Electrochemical Society. He also is a senior member of the Mineral, Metals, & Materials Society and has served on many national and international advisory panels. Singhal earned a doctorate in materials science engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. He received a master's in business from the University of Pittsburgh, a bachelor's in metallurgy from the Indian Institute of Science, and a bachelor's in physics, chemistry and mathematics from Agra University.

Singhal has authored more than 85 scientific publications, edited 14 books, received 13 patents, and given more than 250 plenary, keynote or other presentations worldwide. He is an adjunct professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Utah and serves on advisory boards of the University of Florida's Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Institute for Sustainable Energy.  (Posted 11/1/2008)

IUMS

Scott Baker appointed by NAS as delegate of U.S. National Committee to the International Union of Microbiological Societies

Scott Baker has been appointed by the National Academy of Sciences to be one of six delegates of the U.S. National Committee to the International Union of Microbiological Societies (IUMS) with rights to vote during the IUMS General Assembly. In addition, Scott was elected to serve as the IUMS Mycology Division vice-chair. The vice-chair is responsible for the next International Congress of Mycology in 2011 and serves on the IUMS executive board.  (Posted 9/1/2008)

science

Bruce Garrett Advises National Science Foundation Program

Dr. Bruce Garrett was selected as advisor to a National Science Foundation Partnership in International Research and Education Program entitled Theoretical and Computational Chemistry: Potential Energy Surfaces, Collisions with Surfaces, and Electronic Non-Adiabatic Reactions. The program builds relationships between U.S. and international institutions. The goal is to promote globally engaged, U.S. researchers. The program teams U.S. college students and mentors abroad on specific research projects.

As an advisor, Garrett evaluates the work of the team developing algorithms and software to simulate electrons and atomic nuclei in large carbon-based molecules. Garrett was asked to join because of his expertise in theory, simulation, and mentoring.

As director of PNNL's Chemical and Materials Sciences Division, Garrett leads the work to develop tools and understanding required to control chemical and physical processes in complex multiphase environments.

 (Posted 8/1/2008)

physics

Institute of Physics recognizes article by Scott Chambers for potential to advance frontiers of materials research

Top editors at the Institute of Physics selected a review article written by EMSL user Scott Chambers (PNNL) for its potential to significantly advance the frontiers of materials research. The institute assembles a select set of articles that demonstrate thought leadership in physics and promotes the articles through IoP Select. Chambers' 8-page article reviews the scientific opportunities and challenges of molecular beam epitaxy, or MBE. He was asked to write the article because of his research at PNNL, including his work with the Institute for Interfacial Catalysis and his work developing oxide MBE at EMSL. The article is published in Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter 20:264004 (July 2008)  (Posted 7/1/2008)

energy

Tony Janetos on climate change impacts

Dr. Tony Janetos gave testimony on climate change impacts to the U.S. House of Representative Committee on Energy and Commerce in Washington, D.C. on June 26, 2008. He spoke to the Subcommittee on Energy and Air Quality on the subject, "Climate Change: Costs of Inaction," drawing from a recent national assessment that he and others led. Janetos directs the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a partnership of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Maryland. View a webcast or a PDF of the printed testimony from Janetos and the other panelists.  (Posted 7/1/2008)

NAE

Eric Smith Selected for Prestigious NAE Symposium

Eric Smith, a radiation detection instrumentation specialist at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been invited to participate in the 2008 U.S. Frontiers of Engineering Symposium in September.

This is the sixth year in a row a PNNL staff member has been invited to attend the annual symposium, which brings together a select group (fewer than 100) of the nation's outstanding young engineers (between 30-45 years old) from industry, academia and government to discuss pioneering technical work and leading-edge research in various engineering fields and industry sectors. Attendees are selected based on having "demonstrated accomplishment in engineering research and technical work with recognizable contributions to advancing the frontiers of engineering."

Smith is a senior research scientist/engineer at PNNL advancing science and developing technologies in the area of applied radiation detection. His achievements include:

  • National recognition for technical contributions and leadership in the development and evaluation of radiation detection systems for national security and in the development and use of simulation tools for detection scenario analysis.
  • Active in developing next-generation sensor technologies for nuclear fuel cycle safeguards.
  • Leads a high-visibility, multi-organization effort to develop modeling and simulation tools necessary to evaluate the Advanced Spectroscopic Portal systems for the Department of Homeland Security's Domestic Nuclear Detection Office.
  • Technical lead of the DOE Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Safeguards Enhancement Study.
  • Current research projects also include the development of advanced radiation transport methods using coupled deterministic-Monte Carlo methods, and the exploration of lead slowing-down spectroscopy for irradiated nuclear fuel assay.
  • Taught the "Nuclear Science in Homeland Security" course at the IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium for the last three years and has been an invited speaker at venues ranging from highly technical to community-oriented.

Smith was awarded the IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society Radiation Instrumentation Early Career Award in 2006, and was nominated and selected to Senior Member status during that same year. He also received the DOE Outstanding Mentor Award in 2002.

The Frontiers of Engineering Symposium will be hosted Sept. 18-20 by Sandia National Laboratories at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque. It gives early-career engineers an opportunity to learn about cutting-edge developments in fields other than their own. The goal is to facilitate collaborative work and the transfer of new approaches and techniques across fields.

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is a DOE Office of Science national laboratory where interdisciplinary teams advance science and technology and deliver solutions to America's most intractable problems in energy, national security and the environment. PNNL employs 4,000 staff, has an $855 million annual budget, and has been managed by Ohio-based Battelle since the lab's inception in 1965.  (Posted 7/1/2008)

Yanwen

Yanwen Zhang invited to 2008 German-American Frontiers of Engineering Symposium

Yanwen Zhang has been invited by the National Academy of Engineering to attend the 2008 German-American Frontiers of Engineering Symposium on April 25 - 27, 2008. The symposium will be held at the National Academies' Beckman Center in Irvine, California, and is organized by the NAE and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. About 60 outstanding engineers, generally not older than 45, from U.S. and German industry, universities, and government labs are invited to discuss leading-edge research and technical work across a range of engineering fields. The NAE believes that convening engineers from disparate fields and challenging them to think about developments and problems at the frontiers of areas different from their own will lead to a variety of desirable results, including collaborative work, the transfer of new techniques and approaches across fields, and establishment of contacts among the next generation of leaders in engineering. Yanwen, a senior research scientist at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, has been highly recognized for her contributions in ion-solid interactions, irradiation effects and ion beam techniques. She was selected previously for a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers in recognition of her research in the fields of ion beam physics and ion-solid interactions, especially in the field of electronic stopping in solids.  (Posted 6/26/2008)

tee

Justin Teeguarden Named to NAS Nanoscience Review Committee

Justin Teeguarden was invited to serve as a member of the National Academy of Science's committee to review the National Nanotechnology Initiative's (NNI) Strategy for Nanotechnology-Related Environmental, Health, and Safety Research. The NNI strategy roadmap is to guide federal investments in research for nanotechnology-related environmental, health, and safety research.

Teeguarden is currently active with the Systems Toxicology of Nanomaterials Focus Area, part of PNNL's Environmental Biomarkers Initiative. He leads research related to computational dosimetry of nanomaterials and health effects. In addition, Teeguarden brings to the NAS review a background in pharmacokinetics including modeling and risk assessment.

Teeguarden joined PNNL in 2004. Before that time, he was a senior associate/toxicologist at the K.S. Crump Group and Environ International. He has also served in a range of elected and appointed offices in the Society of Risk Analysis and the Society of Toxicology.  (Posted 5/1/2008)

bruce

Bruce Napier Contributes to NAS Committee Report

Bruce Napier served on the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Toxicology investigating the health consequences of the use of depleted uranium in munitions. The first of two planned reports has been issued. This volume, Review of Toxicologic and Radiologic Risks to Military Personnel from Exposure to Depleted Uranium During and After Combat, has been released in prepublication form on the NAS website at . The book reviews the toxicologic, radiologic, epidemiologic, and toxicokinetic data on depleted uranium, and assesses the Army's Capstone Project estimates of health risks to personnel exposed during and after combat. The report recommends that the Army perform a minor reevaluation of the basis for some of its predictions about health outcomes at low levels of exposure, but, overall, the Capstone Report was judged to provide a reasonable characterization of the exposure and risks from depleted uranium. A second report is planned that will deal with public exposures to the residual contamination left in the environment after combat.  (Posted 5/1/2008)

gorton

Ian Gorton Provides Leadership for Special Edition of Computer Magazine

Ian Gorton led the development of a special edition of Computer magazine on Data Intensive Computing. Computer is the flagship magazine of the IEEE Computer Society. Ian, who is the chief architect for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Data Intensive Computing Initiative, proposed and worked with colleagues Paul Greenfield, CSIRO; Alex Szalay, Johns Hopkins University; and Roy Williams, Caltech, to solicit papers and referee the submissions. Ian's editorial introduces the topic of data intensive computing, and maps out research challenges for the community to address so that ever larger data collections can be handled in a scalable fashion. "The deluge of data that future applications must process—in domains ranging from science to business informatics—creates a compelling argument for substantially increased R&D targeted at discovering scalable hardware and software solutions for data-intensive problems," Ian says. View the special edition.  (Posted 4/1/2008)

dooley

James Dooley give Capitol Hill Briefing on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies

Technologies for capturing and storing carbon dioxide emissions hold tremendous promise for addressing climate change, but much work remains to ensure timely, cost-effective deployment in key markets such as the electric power industry. These were some of the key points James Dooley made at a Senate briefing in March, where legislators and other stakeholders explored the business and policy aspects of commercially deploying carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies. CCS is an emerging suite of science and technologies designed to capture carbon dioxide from power plants and store it underground, preventing greenhouse gases from reaching the atmosphere.

Dooley spoke on a panel about issues surrounding large-scale CCS deployment. Dooley, a scientist with PNNL's Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division and the Joint Global Change Research Institute, is an international expert on the role of carbon capture and storage in addressing climate change. He spoke about the marketplace for CCS, geologic storage capacity worldwide, and the potential for large-scale CCS deployment in the United States.

The March 31 briefing, "The Business Case for Carbon Capture and Sequestration," was sponsored by the Center for Strategic and International Studies in partnership with the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, the British Foreign Office, and the Mission of the United States of America to the European Union. The event was convened to shed light on business, economic, and policy considerations important to the future role of CCS. Sen. Jeff Bingaman, Chair of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, opened the briefing, followed by speakers from the business and science communities. Dooley's presentation and those of the other panelists are online.

Dooley served as Lead Author and Cross-Cutting Chairman for a recent assessment of CCS for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which won the Nobel Peace Prize last year. For the Global Energy Technology Strategy Program, he co-authored a number of landmark reports addressing CCS and other climate change mitigation technologies.  (Posted 4/1/2008)

rosso

Kevin Rosso Writes Crystal Chemistry Article for International Journa

Kevin Rosso co-authored an article for Zeitschrift für Kristallographie, one of the world's oldest scientific journals. Rosso was part of the eight-author team that prepared "Bonded interactions and the crystal chemistry of minerals." The authors reviewed the last century of research on the bond length, radii, bond strength, and bond valence of minerals and other crystals.

The article reviews research conducted into the bonding structure and reactivity of crystals. Understanding the behavior the electrons in the minerals could lead to advances in fields as diverse as soil remediation and material design.

Further, the article surveys the physical properties of the distribution of electrons for selected minerals and molecules. These surveys were generated with first-principles local energy density quantum mechanical methods; that is, studies that examined the physical interactions of electrons. Some of these surveys were performed using computational tools at U.S. Department of Energy's Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility, located at PNNL.

The National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Energy, and Bundesminister fuer Bildung und Forschung supported this research.

Citation: Gibbs, GV, RT Downs, DF Cox, NL Ross, CT Prewitt, KM Rosso, and T Lippmann, and A Kirfel. 2008. "Bonded interactions and the crystal chemistry of minerals: A review," Zeitschrift für Kristallographie 223(01-02):001-040.  (Posted 3/1/2008)

sanquist

Tom Sanquist appointed as human factors expert to National Academy of Engineering Panel

Tom Sanquist has been appointed to the National Research Council Standing Committee on Human Factors for a three-year term. The purposes of the committee, composed of 16 experts from academia and industry, are to provide new perspectives on theoretical and methodological issues concerning the relationship of individuals and organizations to technology and the environment; to identify critical issues in the design, test, evaluation and use of new human-centered technologies; and to advise sponsors on the research needed to expand the scientific and technical bases for designing technology to support the needs of its users.

Tom provides an applied research perspective to the committee, and specialized knowledge in the human factors aspects of homeland security and transportation. His work at PNNL is concerned with developing effective homeland security screening systems, public acceptance of security technology, and general human factors and industrial engineering of complex systems.  (Posted 2/20/2008)

mesa

Liz Stephens Liz Stephens Honored for Engineering Achievements and Contributions to MESA Program

Liz Stephens was recognized at both the state and national level at Washington's Mathematics Engineering Science Achievement (MESA) 25th anniversary celebration and awards banquet. Liz received this award for her engineering achievements and commitment to helping the next generation of MESA students achieve their dreams.

Additionally, Liz was named the Most Promising Engineer or Scientist at the Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Awards Conference. Liz was selected for this due to her many contributions in science, her leadership abilities and initiative, her potential for advancement and her involvement in the hispanic community. The award recognizes a professional engineer or scientist with less than eight years experience since earning his or her undergraduate degree.

At PNNL, Liz is involved with improving the energy efficiency of vehicles and energy conversion systems. She supports the DOE Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance program and works with local youth through several education programs.  (Posted 2/1/2008)

wiley_pens

Steven Wiley Pens Monthly Column for The Scientist

Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory's Steven Wiley, Lead Scientist for Biology, has accepted an invitation from The Scientist to write a monthly column on his thoughts and opinions about life sciences. His first column, which appeared in the January 2008 issue, provides a perceptive discussion of the oral traditions in life sciences and provides insights into the growing challenges scientists face in gathering and disseminating information. The article can be accessed at http://www.the-scientist.com/article/display/54043/.

Wiley was asked to write the column because of the fresh perspectives he brings as well as his scientific credibility. In particular, the journal's editorial board was impressed with his collaborative research into large-scale protein-protein interactions and cell signaling networks at EMSL as well as his work as the Director of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Biomolecular Systems Initiative.

While his credentials helped make him a logical choice for this task, it was his lively writing style that had the journal's editors repeatedly ask him to take over the column. "They thought I was entertaining," he noted.  (Posted 2/1/2008)

 

2007 Awards

Julia Laskin

PNNL's Julia Laskin honored with 2006 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

A physical chemist at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been recognized with a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers - the highest honor given by the U.S. government to scientists and engineers who are beginning their careers.

Julia Laskin was honored for her leadership in the field of gas-phase ion chemistry and mass spectrometry of large complex molecules that is critical for development of new analytical techniques for improved chemical characterization of synthetic and natural polymers, petroleum, biofuels and other complex samples in biology, environmental science, drug discovery and counter-terrorism. Her internationally recognized research in fundamental reaction kinetics and ion surface reactions provides a basis for understanding the mass spectrometry of high molecular weight compounds and preparation of novel biomaterials.

"These awards reflect our belief that the representatives of the new generation of scientists and engineers honored today are meeting demanding scientific and technical challenges with superior leadership, knowledge and insight," Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman said. "I'm pleased to recognize the extraordinary scientific and technical achievements represented by the awardees' contributions."

Interim Laboratory Director Mike Kluse said he is pleased that for the second year in a row, a PNNL staff member is being honored with this award. "The PECASE awards recognize young scientists at the frontiers of their disciplines," he said. "Julia is a leader whose research contributes to vital DOE missions through significant advancements in biological and environmental science, medical research and counter terrorism."

Laskin is a senior research scientist in the Chemical & Materials Sciences Division of PNNL's Fundamental and Computational Sciences Directorate. She earned a master's degree in physics from the Physico-Mechanical Division of the Leningrad Polytechnical Institute in Russia in 1990, and a doctorate in physical chemistry from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in Israel in 1998. She started at PNNL as a postdoctoral research associate in 2000 and has been a research scientist with the Laboratory since 2003.

Each Presidential award winner received a citation, a plaque and a commitment for continued funding of their work from their agency for five years. Laskin is one of four DOE national laboratory staff members receiving the PECASE award this year.  (Posted 11/1/2007)

glantz

Cliff Glantz Awarded for Exceptional Service to DOE Emergency Management

Richard Davis (left), Chair of the EMI Special Interest Group Steering Committee, presents Cliff Glantz with an award for exceptional service during the group's annual meeting in May 2007.

On May 9, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researcher Cliff Glantz was presented with a special recognition award at the annual meeting for the Department of Energy's Emergency Management Issues - Special Interest Group. In front of about 250 colleagues, Cliff was given the award for sustained outstanding services to the EMI Special Interest Group, "particularly in his role as chair of the Subcommittee on Consequence Assessment and Protective Action [SCAPA] and for exceptional contribution to the DOE Emergency Management Program in general."

For the past five years, Cliff has chaired the SCAPA, which became a part of the EMI Special Interest Group three years ago; prior to that it was an independent DOE committee. Through its working groups, the SCAPA provides DOE and its contractors with technical information and recommendations for emergency preparedness to assist in safeguarding the health and safety of workers and the public. Cliff became involved in these organizations through his work developing consequence assessment models and participating as a meteorologist and hazards assessment team member in the Hanford Emergency Operations Center.

Cliff is a staff scientist in the Applied Atmospheric Sciences Group of the Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division. His emergency preparedness work is supported by the DOE Office of Emergency Management and Policy (NA-41), the Hanford Emergency Preparedness Program, and the Laboratory's Facilities and Operations Directorate.  (Posted 7/1/2007)

zachara_eol

PNNL Scientist Honored with National Department of Energy Award

John Zachara, a scientist at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been recognized by DOE with the prestigious E.O. Lawrence Award. The Lawrence Award honors scientists and engineers at mid-career for exceptional contributions in research and development that support DOE and its mission to advance the national, economic and energy security of the United States.

Zachara is the sixth PNNL scientist to win the DOE award since its inception in 1959. He will be honored by Energy Secretary Samuel Bodman at a ceremony in late March in Washington, D.C. DOE announced the eight winners earlier today.

Lawrence Awards are given in each of the following seven categories: Chemistry; Environmental Science and Technology; Life Sciences (including Medicine); Materials Research; National Security; Nuclear Technology; and Physics. Zachara was honored in the Environmental Science and Technology category. Each Lawrence Award recipient receives a $50,000 honorarium as well as a citation signed by the Secretary of Energy and a gold medal bearing the likeness of Ernest Orlando Lawrence.

Zachara is the senior chief scientist for environmental chemistry in the Chemical and Materials Sciences Division of PNNL's Fundamental Sciences Directorate. His research has focused on chemical interactions of toxic metals and radionuclides with mineral surfaces and microorganisms that control the rate at which these contaminants move through soils, sediments and groundwater. He has published more than 125 scholarly articles on these subjects. Zachara also has been instrumental in bringing teams of top scientists to Hanford to collaborate with PNNL and Hanford scientists to resolve complex issues of subsurface contaminant migration.

Zachara earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry from Bucknell University in 1973, a master's degree in soil and watershed chemistry from the University of Washington in 1979, and a doctorate in soil chemistry from Washington State University in 1986. He has been at PNNL since 1979.  (Posted 2/7/2007)

Satya Kuchibhatla

Satyanarayana Kuchibhatla Receives American Vacuum Society (AVS) Award

Satya Kuchibhatla received the AVS Graduate Research Award for 2007. The award was established to recognize and encourage excellence among graduate students in the sciences and technologies of interest to AVS. Satya received the award at the AVS 54th International Symposium in Seattle on October 17. He is a graduate student from University of Central Florida conducting research with EMSL researchers Theva Thevuthasan and Don Baer.  (Posted 10/31/2007)

pryor

Kathy Pryor Receives National Award from American Board of Health Physics (ABHP)

Kathryn H. Pryor, CHP, was awarded the 2007 William McAdams Outstanding Service Award by the American Board of Health Physics. The McAdams Award is given in recognition of significant contributions to the certification process and the promotion of professionalism in the field of Health Physics. Kathy is a Chief Health Physicist in the ESH&Q Directorate with 25 years of experience, and has served as the Chair of the ABHP, Secretary of the American Academy of Health Physics, and Chair of the Part II Panel of Examiners.  (Posted 8/1/2007)

diatome

Alice Dohnalkova Earns Diatome Award from Microscopy Society of America

Alice Dohnalkova was presented with the Diatome Award during the national meeting of the Microscopy Society of America on August 8 in Fort Lauderdale. The award recognizes distinguished scientists who present new and enlightening work in the field of microscopy. Alice received the award for the best use of ultramicrotomy in the presentation "Creating 3D Reconstruction of Cyanobacterium Cyanothece sp. by Alignment of Serial TEM Tomograms." As part of this award, she will receive a trip to Switzerland to visit the Diatome factory, where precision diamond knives are manufactured for electron microscopy applications.  (Posted 8/1/2007)

zhou_award

Xiao-Dong Zhou Recipient of 2007 Young Investigator Award

Dr. Xiao-Dong Zhou was awarded the J. Bruce Wagner Jr. Young Investigator Award from the Electrochemical Society. The award was established in 1998 and is presented every other year to recognize a young member of the Society who has demonstrated exceptional promise for a successful career in science and technology in the field of high temperature materials.

Dr. Zhou will officially receive the award at the Society's fall meeting this October in Washington DC. During the meeting he will give his award keynote lecture, "Defect Chemistry and Charge Transport in Low Dimensional Oxides." Along with the prestigious honor, he will also receive $1,000.

A research scientist at PNNL, Dr. Zhou's interests span the areas of structural, transport and magnetic properties of condensed matters and nonstoichiometric chemistry. He has published numerous peer-reviewed papers, proceedings and book chapters.  (Posted 7/1/2007)

Richland's IEEE Power Engineering Society Wins Outstanding Chapter Award

Henry Huang, Ning Zhou and Kevin Schneider played a leadership role in a big win for the Richland Chapter of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Power Engineering Society (PES). In June, the Chapter was presented the 2006 Outstanding Small Chapter Award. Each year, IEEE-PES honors one small chapter (less than 100 members) and one large chapter out of more than 100 chapters world wide. The award is given based on the best overall set of programs and activities in serving their chapter's membership.

Huang, Zhou and Schneider, the members of the Chapter's 2005-2006 Executive Committee, held 23 technical meetings including a 10-session Profession Engineer Exam review course. In addition, they supported two engineering scholarships at Washington State University Tri-Cities campus and Walla Walla College.  (Posted 7/1/2007)

Stephen Mladineo Receives Meritorious Service Award from the Institute for Nuclear Management

Stephen Mladineo received the Meritorious Service Award from the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management. This award focuses on long-term outstanding contributions to the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management, as well as Steve's noteworthy accomplishments and contributions to the profession.  (Posted 7/1/2007)

Tom Shea receives Distinquished Service Award from Institute for Nuclear Materials Management

Tom Shea was awarded the Distinguished Service Award from the Institute for Nuclear Management. He was presented this award for his long-term contributions to international and domestic nuclear materials safeguards.  (Posted 7/1/2007)

PNNL staff recognized by Columbia Chapter Health Physics Society

Woody Buckner, Tomas Moreno and Rob Sitsler were recognized by the Columbia Chapter Health Physics Society. Woody received the Operational Health Physicist of the Year Award. Tomas was named Radiation Safety Technologist of the Year. And, the Health Physicist of the Year Award went to Rob. "I am extremely proud of Rob, Woody and Tomas," says Robert Ford, Radiological Control group manager. "Each of these awards is a significant professional honor, and the fact that the PNNL Radiological Control group took three of these awards this year says volumes about these guys. The competition in the chapter from Hanford contractors, other local and regional firms, colleges, universities, and local and regional medical companies is stiff. This is a great achievement."  (Posted 5/21/2007)

acs_award

Jay Grate Wins American Chemical Society Regional Industrial Innovation Award

Jay Grate, Laboratory Fellow in the Fundamental Science Directorate, recently won the American Chemical Society Regional Industrial Innovation Award for his work in developing the patented BSP3 Polymer. The award, to be presented at the ACS regional meeting, June 17-21, celebrates individuals and teams whose creative innovations have contributed to the good of the community and society. An R&D 100 award winner, this BSP3 carbosiloxane compound collects and concentrates vapor molecules from the air. It can be used in detectors for organophosphorus compounds, such as chemical agents. The polymer's properties enable handheld sensor systems to detect toxic vapors quicker and at lower concentrations than was possible using previous materials.  (Posted 5/1/2007)

estes_laser

Jeff Estes Recognized for Leadership in Science Education Reform

The Washington Council of the American Electronics Associations recognized Jeff Estes and four business leaders for their role in making the Washington State's Leadership and Assistance for Science Education Reform (LASER) program a success. Jeff and his team have provided successful strategies for promoting and encouraging science and math, including the nationally recognized LASER program. LASER encourages school districts to initiate, implement and sustain a standards-based, inquiry-centered science education program in grades K-8.  (Posted 3/1/2007)

pratt_ieee

Richland Section names Rob Pratt 2006 IEEE Engineer of the Year

Rob Pratt received the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Richland Section's 2006 Engineer of the Year award. Rob was awarded this honor for his significant contributions in power grid reliability, renewable energy, energy efficiency and energy conservation.

At PNNL, Rob leads the Electricity Infrastructure Operations Initiative. The initiative recently commissioned the new Electricity Infrastructure Operations Center—a unique, grid-focused technology development, training and technology transfer platform for PNNL and users from utilities and industry. Rob also manages PNNL's GridWise™ Initiative for DOE's Office of Electricity. GridWise has spawned a new DOE program and an industry alliance that share a vision of an information-rich future for the power grid. He leads a team with a focus on communications architecture, advanced control technology, and simulation and analysis of the combined engineering and economic aspects of the future grid.  (Posted 2/1/2007)

slicks

Jack Slicks receives Director's Award for Individual Excellence from DOE Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence

Jack Slicks received the "Director's Award for Individual Excellence" at the first DOE Office of Intelligence and Counterintelligence Award Program. He was honored for his visionary leadership of the PNNL CI Program.  (Posted 12/1/2007)

Wayne Martin

Wayne Martin Named Black Engineer of the Year for Community Service

An environmental scientist at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been nationally recognized for community service through the Black Engineer of the Year Awards Conference.

Wayne Martin, a technical group manager at PNNL, is being honored with the prestigious engineering, science and technology management award for his efforts to increase involvement of under-represented minorities in the engineering and scientific fields and for his leadership and significant contributions to the Tri-Cities community.

This national award is sponsored by the Council of Engineering Deans of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities, Lockheed Martin Corporation, U.S. Black Engineer and Information Technology Magazine. Martin will receive his award at the 22nd Black Engineer of the Year Awards Conference in February in Baltimore.

"Wayne exemplifies the principle of community service and distinguishes himself as a leader locally, regionally and nationally through his service to community," said Battelle President and CEO Carl Kohrt. " His dedication as a role model and mentor and his promotion and encouragement of under-represented minorities in science, engineering and math professions make him truly deserving of this award."

Martin serves as vice-chair of the Board of Trustees at Columbia Basin College and was chair for the past six years. He has been an officer in the Trustees Association for Community and Technical Colleges at the state level. He is also a member of the Washington State University Tri-Cities and the Tri-Cities Education advisory councils, past president of the Pacific Northwest chapter of the National Organization for the Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers, and is on the board of directors for Kadlec Medical Center. He also was a participant in the branch campus study team that resulted in a four-year university being established at WSU Tri-Cities and is a past member of the higher education task force that contributed to the Three Rivers Community Roundtable.

Martin earned a bachelor's degree in wildlife management from Washington State University, a master's degree in radiological sciences from the University of Washington and a doctorate in environmental and natural resource sciences from Washington State University. He worked for PNNL from 1978 to 1993, and rejoined the Laboratory in 1997 following an education leave of absence to obtain his doctorate.  (Posted 11/5/2007)

homeland

Doug McMakin wins Christopher Columbus Homeland Security Award

Doug McMakin, National Security Directorate, has been selected to receive the prestigious Christopher Columbus Fellowship Foundation Homeland Security award for his leadership in developing the millimeter wave holographic body scanning system. The security system detects concealed metallic and nonmetallic items and is being used globally for security in airports and other facilities.

Doug is being recognized in the Border/Transportation Security category. The scanning system currently is being used worldwide in homeland security and counterterrorism efforts. The technology provides security officers with a non-contact, non-ionizing radiation tool that can screen individuals for potentially lethal concealed threats. It has been licensed to L-3 SafeView, which is using the technology as the basis for a line of screening systems, including the SafeScout 100TM. More than 75 systems are deployed worldwide in locations including Iraq, Israel, Mexico, Europe, South America and Asia in high-risk areas such as airports, subways, border crossings, and government and military facilities.

"This award recognizes the role PNNL researchers play in helping solve the country's greatest homeland security challenges," said Interim Lab Director Mike Kluse. "Doug and his team persevered for many years developing a technology they personally believed in, and I'm pleased the foundation is recognizing these efforts."

The screening systems have been successfully demonstrated in the U.S. and are undergoing further testing by the Department of Homeland Security. In fact, the system will be tested at Phoenix in the near future, with additional machines to be tested at John F. Kennedy International Airport and Los Angeles International Airport.

The foundation recognizes citizens or companies that are making a measurable and constructive contribution related to basic and/or advanced research in the area of homeland security which will result in a significant and positive benefit to society.

Jim Thomas, a PNNL chief scientist, was also one of the top three finalists for the award. He was recognized for his leadership of the Department of Homeland Security's National Visualization and Analytics Center. NVAC is a leading resource for visual analytics technology and tools that detect, prevent and reduce the threat of terrorist attacks.  (Posted 10/15/2007)

wilcoxon

Dale Anderson wins Frank Wilcoxon Prize for best practical application paper in Technometrics

Dale Anderson won the Frank Wilcoxon Prize for the paper "Detection and Location of Gamma-Ray Sources with a Modulating Coded Mask." Dale, the lead author, was assisted in writing the article by Randy Hansen, Tony Peurrung and Sharon Wunschel and by non-PNNL contributor, David Stromswold. The article presents two methods of detecting and locating a concealed nuclear gamma-ray source for applications in national security and threat detection. The article appeared in the May 2006 issue of Technometrics, a journal dedicated to the development and use of statistical methods in the physical, chemical and engineering sciences. The Frank Wilcoxon award is presented to the best practical application paper appearing in the previous year's Technometrics.  (Posted 10/1/2007)

Lee Burger wins Glen T. Seaborg Award for Contributions to Actinide Separations

Lee Burger's 2007 Glenn T. Seaborg Award makes four "wins" for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, second only to Argonne National Laboratory in the number of Seaborg award recipients. Lee joins PNNL scientists Earl Wheelwright, Jack Ryan and John Swanson in receiving this prestigious award to honor their extraordinary accomplishments, gained in more than 200 years of combined expertise in this field.

The Glenn T. Seaborg Actinide Separations Award is a national award recognizing significant and lasting contributions to separating actinide elements, such as plutonium and uranium. This award reflects the judgment of the Actinide Separation Conference Board representatives currently from Argonne, Idaho, Lawrence Livermore, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, and Savannah River National Laboratories, the Hanford Site, the University of New Mexico, and Washington State University. Read more about the Seaborg honorees.  (Posted 9/12/2007)

hispanic_eng

Elizabeth Stephens named most promising Hispanic engineer

Elizabeth Stephens has received the Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Awards Conference's Most Promising Engineer or Scientist–Undergraduate Degree Award. The award recognizes a professional engineer or scientist with less than eight years experience since earning his/her undergraduate degree. The candidate's early technical contributions should already indicate a promising career.

Elizabeth was chosen due to her contributions to science, leadership abilities and initiative, her potential for advancement and her involvement with the Hispanic community.

Elizabeth currently is involved with improving the energy efficiency of vehicles and energy conversion systems. She supports the DOE Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance program and works with local youth through several education programs. For more information on Elizabeth' award, vist HENAAC.org  (Posted 8/1/2007)

Subhash Singhal Wins Esteemed Fuel Cell Technology Award

Subhash Singhal received the 2007 Fuel Cell Seminar and Exposition Award. Subhash was recognized for this award because of his outstanding leadership and innovation in the promotion and advancement of fuel cell technology.

Dr. Subhash C. Singhal is a Battelle Fellow and Director, Fuel Cells at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in Richland, Washington, where he provides senior technical, managerial and commercialization leadership to the Lab's extensive fuel cell program. He is a highly regarded, acknowledged world leader in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). He joined PNNL in April 2000 after having worked at Siemens Power Generation (formerly Westinghouse Electric Corporation) for over 29 years.

Dr. Singhal is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Utah; and serves on the Visiting Advisory Board of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Florida.  (Posted 8/1/2007)

moe

Moe Khaleel Receives Lifetime Achievement Award for Contributions to Computational Engineering and Fuel Cell Technologies

Moe Khaleel was presented with a lifetime achievement award for his contributions to computational engineering and fuel cell technologies. Moe received the award after delivering the plenary talk on computational electro chemistry for fuel cells at the 2007 International Joint Conference on Knowledge Management for Composite Materials (KMCM), Nanosciences and Fuel Cells.

The KMCM's audience comprises researchers from R&D organizations, academia, government, policy makers and industry. The conference's theme focused on driving research activities towards Nanoscale phenomena and fuel cell development.

Moe, a Laboratory Fellow, is Director of PNNL's Computational Sciences and Mathematics Division. The division provides scientific and technological solutions through the integration of high performance computing, data intensive computing, computational sciences, mathematics, scalable data management, and bioinformatics to advance the laboratory's mission areas. Moe's current research interests are tuned to world energy systems and the future role for fuel cell systems.  (Posted 8/1/2007)

tidwell_award

Robbie Tidwell receives Academy of Certified Hazardous Materials Managers' Champion of Excellence Award

For the second year in a row, Robbie Tidwell received the Academy of Certified Hazardous Materials Managers' Champion of Excellence Award. This national award recognizes outstanding work in the profession of hazardous materials management, promotion of the credential, and active participation in local and national ACHMM activities. Robbie has helped the Lab reduce, reuse or redistribute chemicals.

Further, she has helped develop processes to ensure safe handling, and cost- and time-effective procurement, inventorying and handling. In addition, Robbie has served vice president and president of the Eastern Washington Chapter of ACHMM. Under her leadership as president, the chapter attained the National Award of Honor Roll of Champions for the eighth consecutive year.  (Posted 7/1/2007)

tratz_award

Stephen Tratz wins first-place in 2007 SemEval international competition (Computational Linguistics)

Stephen Tratz's commitment to excellence resulted in PNNL winning first-place in the 2007 SemEval international competition for word sense disambiguation systems. In computational linguistics, word sense disambiguation helps determine which sense a word has in any given context. For example, the word bass could mean a type of fish or tones of low frequency. Although the difference may be obvious to humans, WSD can improve the performance of information and knowledge management applications, such as internet searching and navigating.

PNNL developed this particular WSD system for a Department of Homeland Security project. When lab-funding could not cover the required preparation time for the system's entry to the SemEval competition, Stephen prepared and submitted the system output on his own time, which resulted in the win. PNNL has since been invited to submit a paper that describes the system to the 2007 SemEval WSD workshop in Prague this June. Other staff members involved include Alan Chappell, National Security Directorate; and Michelle Gregory, Christian Posse, project lead Antonio Sanfilippo and Paul Whitney, CISD.  (Posted 5/1/2007)

Awards presented for outstanding education contributions

James Campbell
James Campbell
George Last
George Last
Shuttha Shutthanandan
Shuttha Shutthanandan
Three staff members received the Fitzner-Eberhardt Laboratory Director's Award for Outstanding Contributions to Science and Engineering Education at a ceremony on April 26 in the EMSL Auditorium. At the same time, eight staff members were recognized as DOE outstanding mentors.

Interim Laboratory Director Mike Kluse presented the Fitzner-Eberhardt award to James A. Campbell, National Security Directorate; George Last, Environmental Technology Directorate; and Shuttha Shutthanandan, Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory. Mike praised the recipients for their many contributions to science education, and also recognized four other individuals nominated for the award. They were George Chin, Computational and Information Sciences Directorate; Doug Lemon, NSD; Eric Pierce, ETD; and Irvin Schultz, ETD.

Debbie Trader of the DOE Pacific Northwest Site Office announced the DOE Outstanding Mentor Awards. Recipients were Heather Dillon, Energy Science and Technology Directorate; Janelle Downs, ETD; Gregory Exarhos, Fundamental Science Directorate; Steven Goheen, NSD; Pavel Hrma, ETD; Mitchell Pelton, ETD; Irvin Schultz, ETD; and Susan Southard, ETD.  (Posted 4/1/2007)

PNNL Staff Honored for Energy Smart Technologies

Staff in PNNL's Energy Science and Technology Directorate were honored for the role they played in helping PNNL advance energy smart research and development. Mike Davis accepted the award for Best Research and Development in smart grid technology from the organizers of the GridWeek 2007 conference at the Reagan Building in Washington D.C. The award citation recognized PNNL for much of the fundamental thinking behind the smart grid over past two decades.

In the mid-1980s, dozens of researchers at PNNL were already designing first generation data collection systems that were installed in more than 1000 buildings to monitor near real-time electricity consumption for every appliance. Huge data sets were created and analyzed that fundamentally changed the way buildings and equipment were analyzed. Much of this work is still relevant and being used today.

Based on this early work, PNNL developed a broad suite of analytic tools and technologies that resulted in better sensors, improved diagnostics, and enhanced equipment design and operation. From phasor measurement and control at the transmission level to Grid Friendly™ appliances, their imprint on the creation of the next generation electrical system is unparalleled.  (Posted 4/1/2007)

tratz_award

Stephen Tratz wins first-place in 2007 SemEval international competition (Computational Linguistics)

Stephen Tratz's commitment to excellence resulted in PNNL winning first-place in the 2007 SemEval international competition for word sense disambiguation systems. In computational linguistics, word sense disambiguation helps determine which sense a word has in any given context. For example, the word bass could mean a type of fish or tones of low frequency. Although the difference may be obvious to humans, WSD can improve the performance of information and knowledge management applications, such as internet searching and navigating.

PNNL developed this particular WSD system for a Department of Homeland Security project. When lab-funding could not cover the required preparation time for the system's entry to the SemEval competition, Stephen prepared and submitted the system output on his own time, which resulted in the win. PNNL has since been invited to submit a paper that describes the system to the 2007 SemEval WSD workshop in Prague this June. Other staff members involved include Alan Chappell, National Security Directorate; and Michelle Gregory, Christian Posse, project lead Antonio Sanfilippo and Paul Whitney, CISD.  (Posted 4/1/2007)

ram_invite

Ram Devanathan Receives Prestigious Invite to International Engineering Symposium

Ram Devanathan has been invited to attend the 2007 German-American Frontiers of Engineering Symposium, organized by the National Academy of Engineering and the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation. About 60 engineers, generally not older than 45, from German and U.S. industry, universities and national laboratories were invited because of their innovation, articulation, and leadership.

A Senior Research Scientist in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Fundamental Science Directorate, Ram performs leading-edge research on fuel cell electrolytes for the hydrogen economy, radiation-resistant semiconductors, nanoscale phenomena and novel radiation detector materials.

By gathering up-and-coming engineers and challenging them to think about problems and developments at the frontiers of brain research technologies, robotics, smart materials, and space technologies, the symposium hopes to transfer new techniques and approaches across fields, and build connections among the next generation of leaders in engineering. The symposium will be held April 26-28, 2007, in Hamburg, Germany.  (Posted 3/1/2007)

wang_receives

Lai-Sheng Wang Receives 2006-2007 Sahlin Faculty Excellence Award

Lai-Sheng Wang was awarded the Sahlin Faculty Excellence Award for Research, Scholarship and Arts. Washington State University annually presents three Sahlin awards, recognizing excellence in teaching, public service, and research.

An Affiliate Senior Chief Scientist in the Fundamental Science Directorate at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy and the Program in Materials Science at Washington State University-Tri-Cities, Lai-Sheng Wang is a world leader in nanoclusters research. For example, Lai-Sheng and his colleagues created hollow nanoscale cages of gold atoms, the first known metallic equivalent of the buckyball.

Lai-Sheng showed that the most stable form of gold clusters undergoes shape transformations, a finding that addressed a key issue in fundamental cluster science: understanding the structural evolution of clusters from a single atom/molecule towards the bulk solid. The work has potential applications in energy sciences.

In addition, Lai-Sheng has pioneered the study of solution molecules in the gas phase and developed novel experimental techniques to address fundamental questions of ion solvation and solution chemistry.

During his 20 years in research, Lai-Sheng has written or co-written more than 250 publications. His work has been featured in important journals, including Nature and Science. He is active in the scientific community, working with the American Chemical Society, American Physical Society, Materials Research Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

His contributions as a researcher and a professor have been recognized with numerous awards, including the Humboldt Research Award, Guggenheim fellowship, the National Science Foundation creativity award, and the Alfred P. Sloan fellowship.  (Posted 2/18/2007)

nano_team

Nano-Tech Team Wins Environmental Business Journal Award for Sensor

Yuehe Lin, Guodong Liu, and Chuck Timchalk received a 2006 Environmental Business Journal Technology Merit Award for designing and testing a nanotechnology-based sensor that detects organophosphate insecticides and nerve agents. The award is given by the Environmental Business Journal to recognize notable achievements in the environmental industry.

The sensor is composed of enzymes that self-assemble layer by layer onto tiny, hollow carbon tubes. When the sensor encounters organophosphates, the enzymes slow down. This reduced activity is transmitted as an electrochemical signal through the carbon nanotubes to an attached electrode. By reading the electrode's measurements, users can determine the concentration of organophosphates in environmental samples and biological fluids.  (Posted 1/17/2007)

 

2007 Fellowships

Michel Dupuis Named Fellow in American Physical Society

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory''s Dr. Michel Dupuis was selected as a Fellow in the American Physical Society. The APS, founded in 1899, is a leading voice for physics, including chemical physics, in both the U.S. and international scientific communities. The society publishes several journals, including Physical Review and Physical Review Letters. Dupuis received this honor "for his significant contributions to the development of electronic structure methods and computer codes for the simulation of molecular properties and reactivity."

A Laboratory Fellow, Dupuis has more than 30 years of experience in developing computational chemistry methods and algorithms on supercomputers and their applications to chemical problems. Specifically, his work deals with the characterization of the electronic structure and reactivity of molecules, solids, and interfaces in processes relevant to environmental chemistry, electrochemistry, biochemistry, catalysis, and nanoscience.  (Posted 12/3/2007)

Cesar Izaurralde Selected Soil Science Fellow

Dr. César Izaurralde has been named Fellow of the Soil Science Society of America. This is the highest honor bestowed by the society, which is dedicated to the conservation and wise use of natural resources to produce crops while maintaining and improving the environment. For his outstanding achievements in leadership, professional service and research, Izaurralde was honored with the fellowship award at the society's s annual meeting in November 2007 in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Izaurralde's research at the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a collaboration of PNNL and the University of Maryland, focuses on 1) sustainable agriculture, 2) climate change impacts and adaptation in relation to agriculture and water resources and 3) climate change mitigation through soil carbon sequestration and reductions in soil emissions of nitrous oxide.  (Posted 11/5/2007)

Nine PNNL Researchers Elected Fellows by AAAS

Nine scientists from the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been elected Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for "meritorious efforts to advance science." This is the largest number of PNNL staff selected in a single year and is more than twice as many as any other national laboratory this year.

The nine honorees were elected into five AAAS sections:

Anthony Janetos
Anthony Janetos Guritno Roesijadi
Guritno Roesijadi

Biological Sciences
Anthony Janetos is the director of the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a collaboration between PNNL and the University of Maryland. He is being recognized for "distinguished contributions in ecology and biology of particular relevance to environmental policy." He earned a bachelor's degree in biology from Harvard, and a master's degree and doctorate in biology from Princeton University. He joined PNNL in 2006.
Guritno Roesijadi is a Laboratory Fellow being recognized for "distinguished research contributions on metal detoxification in marine species and in education for developing a doctoral program in integrative biology at Florida Atlantic University." He earned a bachelor's degree in zoology from the University of Washington, a master's degree in fisheries from Humboldt State University, and a doctorate in biology from Texas A&M University. He joined PNNL in 2005.

Chemistry

David Koppenaal
David Koppenaal
David Koppenaal is a Laboratory Fellow and Chief Technology Officer at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a DOE national scientific user facility at PNNL. He is being recognized for "pioneering development of advanced techniques for analytical atomic/isotopic mass spectrometry and for distinguished scientific leadership." He earned a bachelor's degree in environmental chemistry and mathematics from Southwest Missouri State University and a doctorate in analytical chemistry from the University of Missouri at Columbia. He joined PNNL in 1988.
Jun Liu
Jun Liu Lai-Sheng Wang
Lai-Sheng Wang
Jun Liu is a Laboratory Fellow being recognized for "distinguished contributions to the development, understanding and commercialization of self-assembled functional nanoporous materials, and to the development of environmentally friendly solution approaches for oriented nanostructures." He earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from Hunan University in China, and a master's degree in ceramic engineering and a doctorate in materials science and engineering from the University of Washington. He joined PNNL in 2005.
Lai-Sheng Wang is a professor of physics at Washington State University-Tri-Cities and is an affiliate chief senior scientist at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a DOE national scientific user facility at PNNL. He is being recognized for "distinguished and innovative contributions to the field of atomic clusters and for pioneering work on gaseous multiply-charged anions." He earned a bachelor's degree from Wuhan University in Wuhan City, China, and a doctorate from the University of California at Berkeley.

 

Information, Computing and Communications

Jim Thomas
Jim Thomas
Jim J. Thomas is a Laboratory Fellow and the director of the Department of Homeland Security's National Visualization and Analytics Center. He is being recognized for "distinguished scientific and professional leadership in the field of visualization, including the recent foundation of the field of visual analysis." He earned a bachelor's degree in mathematics from Eastern Washington University and a master's degree in computer science from Washington State University. He joined PNNL in 1976.

 

Physics

Richard Kouzes
Richard Kouzes
Richard Kouzes is a Laboratory Fellow being recognized "for distinguished contributions to defining the technical basis and implementation of nuclear radiation detection systems for applications to homeland security, nuclear structure and neutrino physics." He earned a bachelor's degree in physics from Michigan State University, and a master's degree and doctorate in physics from Princeton University. He joined PNNL in 1991.

 

Social, Economic and Political Sciences

James Edmonds
James Edmonds
James A. Edmonds is a Laboratory Fellow and a chief scientist at the Joint Global Change Research Institute. He is being recognized for "distinguished contributions to the field of climate change economics, particularly modeling and analyzing interactions of energy, the economy, technology, carbon cycle, and climate." He earned a bachelor's degree in economics from Kalamazoo College, and a master's degree and doctorate in economics from Duke University. He joined PNNL in 1986.
Richard Moss
Richard Moss
Richard Moss is a senior staff scientist being recognized for "leadership in national and international assessments of climate change and development of the nation's long-term plan for integrated research to address this problem." He earned a bachelor's degree English literature from Carleton College, and a master's and a doctorate in public and international affairs from Princeton. Moss is currently on assignment with the United Nations Foundation.

The honorees will be recognized at the Fellows Forum during the AAAS national meeting in Boston in February. They join 20 PNNL staff members previously elected as AAAS Fellows. Founded in 1848, AAAS has worked to advance science for human well-being through its projects, programs and publications in the areas of science policy, science education and international scientific cooperation.  (Posted 10/25/2007)

asme_fellow

Moe Khaleel elected Fellow of ASME

Moe Khaleel, a PNNL Laboratory Fellow, has been elected a Fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineering. Moe was recognized for his exceptional engineering achievements and contributions to the engineering profession. Moe has held numerous engineering leadership roles, including managing the PNNL hydrogen and transportation programs and the advanced manufacturing product line. He also serves as the national coordinator for modeling activities associated with solid oxide fuel cells for the Solid Energy Conversion Alliance program, and is a member of the Industry Advisory Board of Edison Welding Institute. Moe has won a Federal Laboratory Consortium for Excellence in Technology Transfer Award for superplastic forming of aluminum and the ASME International McGrattan Literature Award.  (Posted 9/28/2007)

sk_fellow

SK Sundaram Adds American Ceramic Society Fellow to List of Accomplishments

SK Sundaram was elected Fellow of the American Ceramic Society's (ACerS) by the Board of Directors. SK, a Chief Materials Scientist, was recognized for his significant, scientific contributions in ceramic/glass/materials science and engineering, including laser-glass interactions. Sundaram holds two Fellow honors this year which includes election by the American Association for the Advancement of Science in February 2007.

The ACerS is a global leader among professional organizations in supporting scientific research and emerging technologies with ceramics as a key element. Sundaram will be recognized at the Honors and Awards Banquet at our 109th Annual Meeting this September.  (Posted 5/11/2007)

parkhurst_fellow

Mary Ann Parkhurst Named Health Physics Society Fellow

Mary Ann Parkhurst was named a Fellow in the Health Physics Society. This award, presented to senior HPS members, recognizes significant scientific contributions to the health physics profession.

Mary Ann serves as principal investigator and project manager in key radiological and environmental assessments. Some of her most recent projects include leading a 5-year multi-laboratory study characterizing depleted uranium aerosols, which are produced on the battlefield when a DU penetrator perforates conventional or DU armor on combat vehicles. In addition, her team characterized the aerosols' potential health impacts to vehicle crews and first responders.

She also evaluated the environmental and radiological impacts of existing nuclear power plants, leading the technical effort for some of the first U.S. nuclear power plants to apply for a license renewal. Now, she is working on the early site permits and the pre-application for a construction/operating license for a new advanced nuclear power plant.  (Posted 5/1/2007)

 

2007 Elected Positions and Offices

Leonard Bond elected IEEE Region 6 delegate-elect and director-elect

chiefscientist

Jae Edmonds Appointed Chief Scientist

Jae Edmonds was appointed by the U.S. Department of Energy as Chief Scientist for the Integrated Drivers and Systems Responses (IDSR) program within the Office of Science's Climate Change Research Program. As the Chief Scientist, Edmonds will provide leadership and advice on integrated assessment to the IDSR program.

Through its support and management of scientific research, the IDSR program provides insights into the interaction of multiple facets of climate change that would not be available from disciplinary research alone. The IDSR program also develops tools that enable economic analysis and scenario development, and provides a framework in which greenhouse gas emissions, climate, climate change impacts, and adaptation to climate change can be simultaneously and consistently examined. One of the principle components of the IDSR program's research portfolio is the development and exercise of integrated assessment models. These models are core decision support tools that can assist decision makers in the determination of safe levels of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. They achieve this by formally representing the various determinants of greenhouse gas emissions, including demographic, economic, energy, and land use decision making, as well as through representations of the atmosphere, climate, oceans, and climate impacts and adaptation in an internally consistent framework.

A senior staff scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Jae is also a Laboratory Fellow and Chief Scientist at the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a collaboration between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Maryland. He is internationally recognized for his contributions to the field of integrated assessment of climate change and the examination of interactions between energy, technology, policy and the environment.  (Posted 9/1/2007)

fisher_doe

Darrell Fisher Named Scientific Director for DOE Isotope Program

Darrell Fisher was named as Scientific Director of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Isotope Program. In this role, Darrell will bring together the capabilities, resources and requirements of the medical isotope community and national laboratories to address the nation's near- and long-term isotope needs, including cancer treatments, miniature power systems, and other applications.

Darrell, who will continue with his work leading the Laboratory's Radioisotopes Program, was selected because of his outstanding research and work in the scientific community, including the American Nuclear Society, the Society of Nuclear Medicine, and the Health Physics Society.  (Posted 1/17/2007)

Greg Exarhos

Greg Exarhos Elected to 3-Year Term as President of the AVS

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Dr. Greg Exarhos was elected President of the AVS: Science and Technology of Materials, Interfaces, and Processing. Founded in 1953, this not-for-profit society was focused on vacuum science and technology, critical in the early development of vacuum tubes, enabling radio broadcasting, radar, and other technologies. Today, the society has broadened its scope to include such technologically relevant areas as surface science, electronic and magnetic materials, nanoscience, and biomaterials.

Exarhos joined the society because it provided the best forum for his work in materials science and engineering. His pioneering materials processing approaches have been recognized internationally and have opened up new venues in optical and electronic coatings, new materials designed at the nanoscale, multifunctional ceramics, and hybrid polymer composites.

In addition, Exarhos is actively involved in the operations side of the society. An AVS Fellow, he has been elected to the Board of Directors, served as Chair of the Long Range Planning Committee, and has served as Chair of numerous society-sponsored meetings. He currently serves as the Publications Chair and oversees several journals, including the new open access journal, Biointerphases, that he launched for the society in 2006. Exarhos' election was announced at the AVS International Symposium, Seattle, Wash., in October 2007. He will begin his three-year term in January 2008.  (Posted 11/5/2007)

asme_nqa

Ron Schrotke Elected Chair of the ASME Main Committee on Nuclear Quality Assurance

Ron Schrotke was elected Chair of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Main Committee on Nuclear Quality Assurance (NQA-1, Quality Assurance Requirements for Nuclear Facility Applications) for a 3-year term beginning July 1, 2008. ASME NQA-1 is a key national consensus standard for nuclear quality assurance and safety, and is a first choice for the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility applications. ASME NQA-1 is influential in applying quality assurance with the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), the commercial nuclear industry, and the international community. As the Chair of the Main Committee on Nuclear Quality Assurance he reports directly to the ASME Board on Nuclear Codes and Standards. During his term as Chair, Ron will lead the 35 members of the Main Committee, the 10 members of the Executive Committee, and coordinate the 6 Subcommittees reporting to the Main Committee. These Subcommittees are comprised of more than 90 members with memberships that represent a broad cross-section of industry and government organizations – from the DOE and the NRC, and the Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board (DNFSB) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), as well as; national laboratories, nuclear component suppliers, nuclear utilities, and Japanese industry representatives.

For 15 years Ron has participated at ever increasing levels of responsibility in the ASME technical committees associated with nuclear codes and standards. As a member of the Nuclear Quality Assurance standards efforts he has participated and led revisions to the software requirements of the ASME NQA-1 standard, and developed guidance for dealing with software and with electronic records. Ron has been formally recognized by the ASME NQA-1 Committee for his involvement in developmental efforts. He has also worked with the DOE on several Guides and Orders associated with quality assurance.

At PNNL, Ron is a Project Professional and Engineer in the Quality Assurance Services Group with a specialty in nuclear quality assurance. He has worked for Battelle in Richland for more than 20 years.  (Posted 10/1/2007)

Anne Fix Elected Secretary-Treasurer for the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) Division of Environmental Geosciences (DEG)

N.J. (Anne) Fix was elected Secretary-Treasurer by the American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) Division of Environmental Geosciences (DEG) for a 2-year term beginning July 1, 2007. AAPG was founded in 1917 and is the world's largest professional geological society with over 31,000 members in 115 countries. DEG is dedicated to educating the membership of AAPG and the general public about important issues that affect petroleum energy minerals exploration and production. DEG supports carbon sequestration and climate change projects as well as environmental characterization and remediation. Anne was elected to this position in recognition of her prior service to DEG. The AAPG Grants-in-Aid Committee provide funds to students seeking graduate degrees in the geosciences whose research has application to the search for and development of petroleum and energy-mineral resources and to related environmental geology issues. Anne is currently involved, as the Editor, in soliciting papers and preparing a DEG publication devoted to the outstanding graduate student research in environmental geosciences. As an EMD member she actively participates on the coalbed methane, gas hydrates, and uranium committees' efforts to advance the science of geology. Anne is licensed as a Professional Geoscientist (PG) in Texas and is a Registered Environmental Manager (REM). At PNNL, Anne is a Quality Engineer in the ESH&Q Directorate with subject matter expertise in the environmental sciences. She supports various research projects here at the Laboratory.  (Posted 7/1/2007)

douglas_asme

Doug Reid Elected Chair of ASME Local Section

Doug Reid was named Chair of the Columbia Basin Section of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. In Doug's new role, he will conduct board meetings and oversee and report yearly activities to ASME's national organization. Doug has more than a decade of experience in ASME and was an ASME Engineer of the Year nominee.

At PNNL, Doug supports deployment and post-deployment equipment for the Radiation Portal Monitor project. His research interests include technology planning and development and energy conservation.  (Posted 6/1/2007)

hkn_board

Evelyn Hirt Elected Eta Kappa Nu Board of Governors

Evelyn Hirt was elected Member-at-Large to the Eta Kappa Nu (HKN) Board of Governors for a 3-year term beginning July 1, 2007 by its Chapters. Eta Kappa Nu, the Electrical and Computer Engineering Honor Society, is a unique membership organization dedicated to encouraging and recognizing excellence in the electrical and computer engineering field. This 100+ year old organization with nearly 300,000 members consist of students, alumni, and other professionals who have demonstrated exceptional academic and professional accomplishments. The overall governance of HKN is the responsibility of the Board of Governors, a volunteer organization of HKN members that have prominent positions in academia and industry. The Board consists of a president, vice president, past president, secretary, and treasurer, each of whom serves a one-year term. Six directors, four representing each of HKN's geographic regions and two at-large, serve three-year terms. As a long standing member of HKN, Evelyn was elected to this position because of her dedication to the advancement of the profession through excellence, her interest in mentoring students, and her over 30 years of experience at all levels within IEEE. At PNNL, Evelyn is a Principle Professional and Engineer in the ESH&Q Directorate with subject matter expertise in systems (hardware, software and integration) and controls, as well as the Quality Manager for the Computational Information and Sciences Directorate.  (Posted 5/1/2007)

khaleel

Moe Khaleel Named Associate Editor to ASME Journal

Moe Khaleel appointed Associate Editor to the American Society of Mechanical Engineer's Journal of Engineering Materials and Technology.

The Journal publishes research papers on contemporary engineering and materials technology issues including: principles of mechanical behavior, environmental effects on material response and metals, and materials processing techniques. Moe joins eighteen other associate editors responsible for peer-reviewing and editing the research papers that are published quarterly.

Moe is Director of PNNL'S Computational Sciences and Mathematics Division. The group provides creative scientific and technological solution through the integration of modeling, informatics and knowledge management.  (Posted 5/1/2007)

acs_officers

Josef Matyas and Jarrod Crum Take on New Roles for American Ceramic Society

Shawn Kathmann has been invited to contribute to the new perspectives issue of Theoretical Chemistry Accounts. Shawn was one of just 33 chemists, mainly those whose publications began to appear in earnest in the 1996-1999 time frame, selected to write about emerging areas of theoretical chemistry being pursued by a new generation of scientists.

In his 13-page article, Shawn wrote about the chemical physics of reactions involved in nucleation - the general process of describing phase transformations e.g., from the vapor phase to the liquid phase.

"Nucleation occurs in the manufacture of everything from snow flakes to jet engines turbine blades," said the Staff Scientist. "Yet, there are a lot of questions concerning the underlying processes and mechanisms."

In his article, Shawn shares insights concerning rate constants, molecular interactions, statistical mechanics and their consequences on nucleation phenomena. His article, titled "Understanding the Chemical Physics of Nucleation," is one of the most viewed articles in the issue.

Being asked to share thoughts and ideas about the future directions of research is a chance to influence the direction of scientific understanding.

Citation: Kathmann, SM. 2006. "Understanding the Chemical Physics of Nucleation," Theoretical Chemistry Accounts 116:169-182. Abstract online.  (Posted 3/22/2007)

bridge_acs

Novella Bridges Appointed Chair-Elect of Local Section of American Chemical Society

Novella Bridges has been appointed chair-elect for the Richland Local Section of the American Chemical Society. In her one-year term, Novella will be responsible for providing leadership for career development opportunities for women in chemical science fields and promoting women's professional and scientific accomplishments.

In addition to serving as a training lead for the Radiation Portal Monitoring project at PNNL, Novella is involved in the development of radio-labeled composites as therapeutic agents for cancer treatments. She has received several honors and awards, including a 2006 PNNL Women of Achievement award and a 2004 ACS Regional Industrial Innovation Award.  (Posted 2/1/2007)

teeguarden_appointed

Justin Teeguarden Lends Toxicology Advice to Biological Modeling Committee

Justin Teeguarden was appointed to a two-year assignment as a councilor to the Biological Modeling Specialty Section of the Society of Toxicology. This committee provides a focused venue to develop and conduct programs and educational activities that emphasize the latest developments in biological modeling. In addition, the committee advocates for the application of these new techniques for improving biological risk assessment processes.

Justin was selected for this role based on his experience in toxicology, risk assessment and computational modeling. His work has resulted in research models that were used in evaluation studies of exposure, dosage and response. His current research focuses on dose-response relationships for industrial chemicals and new nanomaterials.  (Posted 1/31/2007)

lasure_elected

Linda Lasure to Represent United States in International Microbiological Society

Linda Lasure has accepted the role of at-large member of the U.S. National Committee for the International Union of Microbiological Societies. During her three-year term on the committee, she will promote the advancement of microbiological sciences in this country and throughout the world. She will also ensure U.S. participation in the International Union of Microbiological Societies through the National Academies of Science and National Research Council.

In addition, Linda will look at broader scientific issues, such as fostering opportunities for younger scientists to become engaged in collaborative research, promoting the responsible conduct of science, and examining advances in meta-genomics.  (Posted 1/26/2007)

fisher_hps

Darrell Fisher to Server as Treasurer of Health Physics Society

Darrell Fisher was elected the Health Physics Society treasurer; he will serve one year as treasurer-elect and two years as treasurer. Established in 1956, this nonprofit professional society promotes the practice of radiation safety, including encouraging radiation research, developing standards, and providing information.

For this 6,000 member organization, Darrell will manage and allocate the organization's budget. In addition, he will work with the society's nationally known committees, such as public outreach and education, regarding their budgets. He will also help direct the organization, serving on the senior leadership council.  (Posted 1/2/2007)

bond_ieee

Leonard Bond Elected IEEE Region 6 Delegate-Elect and Director-Elect

Leonard Bond was elected the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Region 6 delegate-elect/director-elect for 2007-2008. Starting Jan. 1, 2009, Leonard will serve for two years as the Region Director and will be the delegate on the IEEE Board for the 12 western states region. Region 6 consists of 56,000 members from western Wyoming and New Mexico, all up and down the Pacific Coast from Alaska to California, including Hawaii. Leonard is an expert in ultrasonics and prognostics with more than 250 publications and seven patents.  (Posted 1/1/2007)

John Hardy and Nathan Canfield Elected to Key Roles in Regional Ceramics Society

John Hardy
John Hardy
Nathan Canfield
Nathan Canfield

John Hardy and Nathan Canfield have been elected as President and Vice President, respectively, in the Eastern Washington Section of the American Ceramic Society.

Within their roles, John and Nathan will serve the information, educational and professional needs of the regional ceramics community through the planning of section activities and collaborating with regional ceramic-professionals. This division is vital to supporting scientific research, emerging technologies and current applications, in which ceramic materials are a key element.

John's research in the Energy Materials & Manufacturing group involves the development of air brazes for use in electrochemical devices. In the Ceramics Development group, Nathan's research focuses on solid oxide fuel cell research.  (Posted 1/1/2007)

Jeff Stevenson Appointed Associate Editor by the American Ceramic Society

Jeff Stevenson, a Laboratory Fellow, has been appointed an Associate Editor of the Journal of the American Ceramic Society for a two-year term. This Journal is among the top sources for ceramic materials science research, providing scientists, engineers, and students with critically assessed, original research for nearly 100 years. Ranked first in total citations and third in impact factor among all journals in the materials science-ceramics category, the journal publishes twelve issues per year filled with top quality research that spans the diverse segments of ceramic science. Topics cover a broad range including: glass science, crystal chemistry, microscopy and microstructure, bioceramic science, powder processing and colloidal science. Jeff will primarily be responsible for reviewing and editing manuscripts in the field of solid oxide fuel cells.  (Posted 12/7/2007)

CharlesLong

Charles Long Appointed to The Open Ocean Engineering Journal Editorial Advisory Board

Dr. Charles Long was recently appointed editor of the The Open Ocean Engineering Journal, published by Bentham Science Publishers. As editor, Long will review contributed manuscripts, accept or reject papers, and be responsible for gathering new and interesting research for the journal. He will play an important role in influencing the current policies and future direction of the journal.

Long is active in the scientific community and was selected for this appointment based upon his reputation in the field. He currently serves as a member of the Oceans Observations Working Group, which is part of the International World Meteorological Organization Baseline Surface Radiation Network. In addition, he participated in the National Science Foundation's Facilities Assessment subcommittee on In Situ Surface and Surface-Atmosphere Exchange, which includes ocean measurements. For the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, Long serves as the Tropical Western Pacific Site Scientist and the Science Translator for the ARM Instantaneous Radiative Flux Working Group.

The Open Ocean Engineering Journal is one of the many new Open Access online peer-reviewed journals. Using an all-electronic format, the journal publishes original research articles, short articles, and review articles in all areas of ocean engineering.  (Posted 12/1/2007)

Mariah Zabriskie

Mariah Zabriskie named standing chair to the National GEM Consortium Executive Committee

Mariah Zabriskie, Organizational Development Systems Directorate, has been named standing chair to the National GEM Consortium executive committee. PNNL is a major GEM sponsor. Its national mission is to increase the number of underrepresented minorities going into science and engineering graduate programs.  (Posted 11/30/2007)

Mark Engelhard Appointed Associate Editor for Surface Science Spectra

Mark Engelhard has been invited to be an Associate Editor for Surface Science Spectra, an international journal devoted to archiving surface science spectra of technological and scientific interest. It is a peer-reviewed official journal of the AVS Science and Technology Society and is published by the society through the American Institute of Physics.  (Posted 11/5/2007)

Kelly Sullivan Elected to Council for Chemical Research

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Dr. Kelly O. Sullivan was elected to the Governing Board of the Council for Chemical Research. She will represent the Laboratory on the board.

The Council for Chemical Research, headquartered in Washington, D.C., promotes cooperation in basic research and encourages high-quality education in the chemical sciences and engineering. The Council's membership comprises more than 200 companies, universities and government laboratories with a combined research and development budget of more than $7 billion.

Sullivan, who leads the Laboratory's Office of Institutional Partnerships, already was active in the Council for Chemical Research before receiving the current board appointment. She serves on the Council's Annual Meeting Planning committee and co-leads the Graduate Education Action Network.

At PNNL, Sullivan is responsible for developing and maintaining collaborations and partnerships with colleges, universities and other research institutions that help the Laboratory achieve its missions for the nation and the world. Sullivan also serves on the Board of Directors for Sigma Xi—the Scientific Research Society, and was a member of the National Innovation Initiative team assembled by the Council on Competitiveness, among other national leadership roles.  (Posted 11/5/2007)

Lai-Sheng Wang Appointed to Editorial Board for The Journal of Physical Chemistry

An Affiliate Senior Chief Scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a professor at Washington State University Tri-Cities, Dr. Lai-Sheng Wang was appointed to the Editorial Advisory Board of The Journal of Physical Chemistry. During his term, Wang will influence the current policies and future direction of this highly respected and highly cited publication.

Wang was selected for this three-year appointment based on his distinguished and innovative contributions to the field of atomic clusters and for pioneering work on gaseous multiply-charged anions. During his 20 years in research, Wang has written or co-written more than 260 publications. He is active in the scientific community, working with the American Chemical Society, American Physical Society, Materials Research Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, where he was recently named a Fellow.  (Posted 11/5/2007)

Dick Smith

Dick Smith Elected to HUPO Council

Dick Smith was elected to a 2-year term to the Council of the Human Proteome Organization at the HUPO World Congress in Seoul, Korea, October 10. HUPO is an international scientific organization representing and promoting proteomics through international cooperation and collaborations by fostering the development of new technologies, techniques and training. The HUPO Council is the organization's decision-making body.

Smith, a Battelle Fellow and Chief Scientist and Director of Proteomics for PNNL's Biological Sciences Division, is an internationally known proteomics expert. His current research emphasis involves the development and application of new methods for quantitatively probing the proteome, which is the entire array of proteins expressed by a cell, tissue or organism. Smith is Director of the Proteomics Research Resource for Integrative Biology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. He has authored or coauthored more than 600 publications, and has been awarded 30 patents and seven R&D 100 Awards.  (Posted 10/15/2007)

qafoku

Nik Qafoku to Serve Three-Year Term as Associate Editor on Editorial Board of the Soil Science Society of America Journal

Nik Qafoku is serving a three-year term as an associate editor on the editorial board of the Soil Science Society of America Journal. As a member of the board, Nik works to ensure the quality of the articles that are published. In agricultural and soil science, this journal rates at the top in number of citations and third in terms of impact. In serving on the board, Nik has a broad and deep knowledge of the scientific literature. Further, he has and is continuing to build connections with his scientific peers around the world. Through this work, Nik is helping to make top-quality information on soil chemistry available to researchers around the world.  (Posted 6/1/2007)

campbell_prof

James R. Campbell appointed Associate Professor of Global Health at George Washington University School of Global Health and Health Services

James R. Campbell was appointed Associate Professor of Global Health, in the George Washington University School of Global Health and Health Services, Washington, D.C. The school is internationally recognized for programs in risk science and environmental health, ecosystems and human health, homeland security, and informatics. Jim joined PNNL in 2005 as a manager in the physical and chemical sciences division. He currently is guiding biological security and biological defense programs and initiatives for national security applications.  (Posted 4/1/2007)

editorial

Wayne Hess to Serve on Editorial Board for Laser Chemistry

Manager of PNNL's Chemical Structure and Dynamics Group, Wayne Hess has been selected to serve on the editorial board for Laser Chemistry. With his peers on the board, which include experts from universities, research foundations, and government councils, Wayne will review technical articles that have been screened by a team of associate editors. When he receives the articles, he will study the manuscript and vote for publishing or rejecting it based on the strength of the science and the clarity of the communication.

An international journal, Laser Chemistry focuses on fundamental studies and applications within the field of laser chemical physics and spectroscopy.

Wayne was selected to serve on the editorial board because of his experience in laser-induced reactions in solids and at surfaces, including his ongoing studies in laser desorption from wide-band gap materials, metal oxides, and semiconductors. In addition, he is actively engaged in collaboration with theory groups to understand the dynamical details of condensed phase reaction dynamics, working towards a broad, material-based mechanistic understanding of excited state reactivity in solids and at surfaces.  (Posted 4/1/2007)

fisher_nrc

Darrell Fisher to Advise Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the Use of Medical Isotopes

Darrell Fisher has been appointed a member of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Advisory Committee on the Medical Uses of Isotopes (ACMUI). The ACMUI advises the NRC on policy and technical issues related to the regulation of the medical use of radioactive material.

Darrell was selected for this appointment because of his strong knowledge of radiation sciences. He specializes in the health effects and dosimetry-related exposure of radioactive materials. In addition, Darrell knows the medical uses of isotopes, has experience with patient advocacy organizations and has worked with cancer patients who have questions about different treatment methods.  (Posted 3/21/2007)

dooley_appointed

Jim Dooley Appointed to Program Committee on Greenhouse Gas Technologies

Jim Dooley was appointed to the Program Committee for the Ninth International Conference on Greenhouse Gas Technologies (GHGT-9). The GHGT conference series is the premier international symposium for the technical community focused on carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies, and is coordinated through the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme. This programme has three main activities:

  • Evaluation of technologies aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions,
  • Promotion and dissemination of results and data from its evaluation studies,
  • Facilitating practical research, development and demonstration activities

The GHGT-9 conference will be held on November 16-20, 2008, in Washington DC, with major sponsorship provided by the U.S. Department of Energy. These conferences are held every two years in the programme' s member countries, AND rotate BETWEEN North America, Europe AND Asia. < / p > < p > Jim IS a senior staff scientist located at the Joint Global Change Research Institute(JGCRI), a collaborative partnership BETWEEN the Pacific Northwest NATIONAL Laboratory AND the University OF Maryland.  (Posted 3/12/2007)

bailey_appointed

Vanessa Bailey Joins Editorial Board of Soil Biology and Biochemistry

Vanessa Bailey was appointed to the Editorial Board of Soil Biology and Biochemistry, a leading journal that is a forum for research on soil organisms, their biochemical activities and their influence on the soil environment and plant growth. Publication themes include the biochemistry of pesticide and pollution decomposition in soil, microbial aspects of soil pollution, the composition of soil populations, modeling of biological processes in soil systems and the biochemical activities of soil organisms.

As a member, Vanessa will referee submissions and help monitor the journal's editorial policy in terms of scope covered and paper quality. She was chosen for this position because of her scientific reputation as a soil microbiologist and her thorough approach to manuscript review.  (Posted 3/8/2007)

metting_named

Metting Named Chair of International Scientific Network

Blaine Metting was installed as Chair of the Microalgae Biofixation Network under the auspices of the International Energy Agency Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Research & Development Programme. Metting, who is Biological and Environmental Sciences Product Line Manager at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, replaced outgoing chair Dr. Paola Pedroni of EniTecnologie, the research arm of the Italian oil company Eni.

The Microalgae Biofixation Network was organized based on an initiative by the U.S. Department of Energy and EniTecnologie. Its purpose is to build multi-institutional research collaborations and share scientific findings related to fundamental understanding of photosynthesis and microalgal productivity and applications to greenhouse gas abatement.

Metting was installed at a meeting of the Network at the University of California, Berkeley, February 16, 2007. Fifty international attendees from industry, academia and government attended the meeting. PNNL has been a Network member for 3 years.

PNNL is currently engaged in research with microalgae in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory Biology Grand Challenge. The Marine Sciences Laboratory at Sequim, Washington, has DOE Office of Fossil Energy support to investigate the relationship between algal productivity and growth rate.  (Posted 2/23/2007)

dupuis_named

Michel Dupuis Named Specialist Editor for Computer Physics Journal

Michel Dupuis to serve another term as a specialist editor for Computer Physics Communications. Published by Elsevier, this journal contains articles on computational models in physics and physical chemistry, computer programs in physics and physical chemistry, numerical methods, algorithms and software.

As a specialist editor, a role he has held with the journal since 1998, Michel reviews articles submitted to the journal, providing comments and assistance to his colleagues around the world. He also suggests special topics and directions for upcoming issues.

The journal''s editorial board asked Michel to take this role because of his thorough and insightful reviews, his impressive publication record, and his extensive knowledge of theoretical and computational chemistry. He is known for his research in developing and applying theoretical and computational chemistry methods relevant to environmental chemistry, electrochemistry, biochemistry, catalysis, and nanoscience.  (Posted 2/23/2007)

spanner_elected

Governor appoints Gary Spanner to 3-year term on Sirti board of directors

Washington State Governor Chris Gregoire recently appointed Gary Spanner, Economic Development Office, to serve a three-year term on the Sirti board of directors. Sirti is a state agency in Spokane engaged in technology-based economic development for the Inland Northwest. Having a staff member from PNNL on the board is part of Sirti's strategy to better serve entrepreneurs in Benton and Franklin counties. Gary's term of office runs through June 2009. Sirti board members develop and produce policies and operating procedures, approve the annual operating budget and review annual progress.  (Posted 1/22/2007)

young_elected

Jonathan Young appointed to the National Research Council Standing Committee on Operational Science and Technology Options for Defeating Improvised Explosive Devices.

Jonathan Young has accepted an appointment to the National Research Council Standing Committee on Operational Science and Technology Options for Defeating Improvised Explosive Devices. The committee organizes studies to research, develop and implement advanced science and technologies to defeat the growing threats and strategies used to assemble and deploy IEDs. Jonathan will provide risk assessment and system engineering expertise. Jonathan''s years of experience in systems and safety engineering, safety analysis and his international recognition as a probabilistic safety assessor make him an excellent choice to serve on this committee.  (Posted 1/8/2007)

zhang_prof

Yanwen Zhang Receives Guest Professor Appointment at Peking University

Based on her international recognition and scientific advances in the area of ion-solid interactions, Yanwen Zhang has been awarded a unique offsite Guest Professor appointment at Peking University, one of the top universities in China. There, Yanwen will supervise graduate student research, enhance PNNL-Peking University collaborations, and contribute to strengthening fundamental ion-beam research at the university.  (Posted 1/1/2007)

 

2007 Impact on Scientific Community

Don Stevens

Don Stevens identified as one of top innovators and entrepreneurs for 2007

In its October 2007 issue, Seattle Business Monthly magazine named Maury White from Infinia Corporation and Don Stevens from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory among its Top 25 Innovators & Entrepreneurs for 2007. The magazine selected the 25 "emerging talents" based on recommendations from venture capitalists, academics, trade groups, and business leaders from various industries. White, Infinia''s Chief Technology Officer and one of its founders, helped develop the Kennewick, Wash. company''s Stirling engine technology for solar-electric generators, combined heat and power systems, and emerging-nation rural electrification. Stevens, a senior project manager and chemist at PNNL in Richland, Wash., is devising ways to convert cellulose-based byproducts, like poplar trees and corn stalks, into biomass-based fuel and products.  (Posted 12/17/2007)

Dick Smith

Dick Smith named to Scientific American 50 list of outstanding leaders

Dick Smith, a Battelle Fellow in the Fundamental and Computational Science Directorate, has been named one of 50 outstanding leaders in the 2007 Scientific American 50—an annual list of 50 key contributors in science and technology. Dick shared the honor for creating a new approach to neurological diagnostics with Desmond Smith of UCLA's David Geffen School of Medicine.

Dick's research may help identify the earliest detectable stages of Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other neurological diseases. Dick's findings indicate that many neurodegenerative diseases leave a biochemical calling card, or biomarker, that may be used to predict early stages of brain impairment. The understandings from this research may result in the discovery of drug targets for new therapeutic approaches. Many biomedical researchers also believe that detecting disease states before symptoms occur is key to reversing many as-yet-incurable diseases.

Dick's work led to the mapping of proteins in brain tissues. This mapping has allowed scientists to examine the location and abundance of large numbers of proteins within healthy brain tissue, which can be compared to protein portraits found within diseased brain tissues. These differences may help identify neurological diseases at a very early stage and proteins that might be targeted for drug intervention. It's hoped that such diseases might be curbed if caught and treated early enough.

"Dick Smith and his team have pushed the frontiers of proteomics instrumentation far beyond what was imagined just a few years ago," according to Doug Ray, PNNL's deputy director for science and technology. "By integrating new ideas into the tools available to conduct research, they have made comprehensive proteomic mapping possible."

This research was supported by the National Institutes of Health and PNNL's Biomolecular Systems Initiative.

Past Scientific American 50 winners include stem cell researcher Douglas Melton, Nobel prize-winning neurobiologist Roderick MacKinnon, former World Health Organization Secretary General Gro Harlem Brundtland, Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, and Apple CEO Steve Jobs.  (Posted 12/10/2007)

Chuck Long

Chuck Long Co-author on "Hot" Paper about Solar Brightening

Chuck Long and co-authors were recognized for their "hot" paper, reported recently by Essential Science Indicators (ESI). According to ESI, a hot paper represents a key paper in a specific field and reflects rapid and significant numbers of citations since its publication. Dr. Long's article, "From dimming to brightening: Decadal changes in solar radiation at the Earth's surface," appeared in the May 6, 2005, issue of Science. According to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) and as reported in ESI, the article has been cited 72 times as of October 3, 2007.

The article discusses evidence showing a reversal in the "dimming" trend (a decreasing trend in downwelling solar energy reaching the Earth's surface) over three decades. Although the causes of these trends are not known, the authors do show that the dimming trend may have acted to somewhat mask the projected global greenhouse warming trend. With the current brightening trend, the projected greenhouse-warming signal might become more apparent.

The ISI uses a special filter to detect hot papers. This involves looking at recently published papers and unusual citation activity in a current period. A list of more than 14,000 journals is maintained by the ISI from which the ESI compiles science performance statistics and science trends data. Both the ISI and ESI are owned and funded through the Thomson Corporation, a leading provider of integrated information-based solutions to the scientific, academic, and government community.

Journal Reference: Wild, M., H. Gilgen, A. Roesch, A. Ohmura, C. N. Long, E. G. Dutton, B. Forgan, A. Kallis, V. Russak, and A. Tsvetkov. 2005. "From dimming to brightening: Decadal changes in solar radiation at the Earth's surface." Science, 308, Issue 5723, 847-850. [DOI:10.1126/science.1103215]  (Posted 11/5/2007)

PNNL Researchers Contribute to Nobel Peace Prize for Climate Change Awareness

Researchers contributed to the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize won by Al Gore and the IPCC. (The Peace Prize medal is a registered trademark of the Nobel Foundation.)

Fifteen researchers in the Atmospheric Science and Global Change Division contributed to the recent Nobel Peace prize awarded to Al Gore and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). Through their involvement in the IPCC, the following researchers are helping to shape how the world views climate change: Antoinette Brenkert, Leon Clarke, James Dooley, Sylvia Edgerton, James Edmonds, Meredydd Evans, Steve Ghan, Anthony Janetos, Nels Laulainen, Ruby Leung, Elizabeth Malone, Richard Moss, Hugh Pitcher, Paul Runci, and Steven Smith.

These climate experts have served as convening authors, lead authors, review editors and expert reviewers on IPCC reports, and seminal research from PNNL is cited throughout the reports. These scientists have also contributed intellectual frameworks that influenced IPCC assessments and the broader climate change community in areas as diverse as integrated assessment, technology's role in mitigation, carbon dioxide capture and storage, and social science contributions in addressing climate change challenges.

In a press release following the award announcement, IPCC chairman Rajendra Pachauri stated, "This is an honour that goes to all the scientists and authors who have contributed to the work of the IPCC," emphasizing the world - wide coverage and interdisciplinary work of the IPCC.

Through the years, the depth and breadth of ASGC contributions to a number of IPCC Assessment Reports demonstrate their standing as world class experts and their influence on the scientific, technical AND socio - economic understanding OF climate change.Congratulations to all on such a great honor.

For more information about their specific contributions to the IPCC, see the PNNL press release  (Posted 10/25/2007)

Leung, Janetos, and Edmonds Invited to National Academies Workshop on Climate

Ruby Leung
Ruby Leung
Tony Janetos
Tony Janetos
James (Jae) Edmonds
Jae Edmonds

Drs. Ruby Leung, Anthony Janetos and James (Jae) Edmonds were invited to participate in the workshop, "Strategic Advice on the U.S. Climate Change Science Program." Hosted by the National Academies, the three-day workshop took place October 15-17 in Washington, D.C. Speakers invited to this workshop are internationally recognized leaders in their field and were encouraged to share their views on the U.S. Climate Change Science Program's future and to help establish scientific objectives.

The workshop was held in response to a recent report by a National Research Council committee evaluating the progress of the U.S.Climate Change Science Program. They concluded that although good progress has been made in understanding and predicting temperature trends and environmental changes, U.S.climate research lacks focus and appropriate funding. The goal of the workshop is to shape the priorities and identify gaps in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program to ensure the long-term success of our nation's climate science. The workshop brings together a broad spectrum of scientists, resource managers, industry, and policymakers.

Dr. Leung is a research scientist and Laboratory Fellow. She gave a plenary presentation on predictive global and regional models, and shared her vision for the U.S.Climate Change Science Program.

Dr. Janetos is a research scientist and the director of the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a collaborative partnership between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Maryland. His plenary presentation focused on the need for the U.S.Climate Change Science Program to perform a new National assessment of climate change impacts.

Dr. Edmonds is a senior staff scientist, Laboratory Fellow, and Chief Scientist at the Joint Global Change Research Institute. He co-chaired a working Group on impacts, adaptation, and mitigation of climate change.

The National Academies is a private, non-profit institution, which advises the nation on scientific and technical matters.They bring together committees of experts in all areas of science and technology. These experts address critical National issues and give advice to the federal government and the public. Four organizations comprise the Academies: the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Medicine, and the National Research Council.  (Posted 10/19/2007)

lecture

Sotiris Xantheas Selected for Prominent Theoretical Chemistry Lecture

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Sotiris Xantheas was selected to participate in the Greater Boston Area Theoretical Chemistry Lecture Series. Sotiris was selected based on his research accomplishments in the field of hydrogen-bonded networks and the development of a new interaction potential for water from first principles electronic structure calculations.

For the lecture series, a committee of graduate students from Harvard, MIT, and Boston University select engaging speakers that appeal to a broad cross-section of the student population. As part of the series, each speaker spends a day at each of the three institutions visiting with faculty and delivers a 3-hour lecture at MIT on the evening of the third day. "The invitation to participate in the lecture series highlights the national recognition our work -- funded by DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences -- is receiving," said Sotiris. "Being a part of the series gave me the chance to interact with faculty and students, establish future collaborations and get fresh ideas about using our capabilities to open new research directions."

During his visit, which took place during September 24-26, 2007, Sotiris provided the next generation of scientists with opportunities to learn more about theoretical chemistry at PNNL. Also, he discussed opportunities to bring students to the Laboratory for collaborative projects next year.  (Posted 10/1/2007)

Wilcoxon

Dale Anderson was awarded the Frank Wilcoxon Priz

Dale Anderson was awarded the Frank Wilcoxon Prize for the paper "Detection and Location of Gamma-Ray Sources with a Modulating Coded Mask." Dale, the lead author, was assisted in writing the article by Randy Hansen, Tony Peurrung and Sharon Wunschel, all NSD, and by non-PNNL contributor David Stromswold. The article presents two methods of detecting and locating a concealed nuclear gamma-ray source for applications in national security and threat detection. The article appeared in the May 2006 issue of Technometrics, a journal dedicated to the development and use of statistical methods in the physical, chemical and engineering sciences. The Frank Wilcoxon award is presented to the best practical application paper appearing in the previous year's Technometrics.  (Posted 10/1/2007)

ghan_speaks

Steve Ghan invited to speak at Gordon Research Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry

Steve Ghan was invited to speak at this year's Gordon Research Conference on Atmospheric Chemistry in August. Speakers at the Gordon Research Conferences are recognized internationally as leaders in the fields of the biological, chemical and physical sciences and are invited to discuss recent advances in their research. Steve focused on the incorporation of aerosol processes and properties in global modeling frameworks, discussing recent work in the field and introducing a path toward meeting future needs in a presentation titled "Aerosols and Gases in Global Atmosphere Models: Current and Future State of the Science."

Held annually since 1931, the conference brings together scientists with common professional interests for a week of intense discussion and examination of the most advanced aspects of their field.  (Posted 9/10/2007)

dagstuhl

Pak Chung Wong participates in international seminar on information visualization

Pak Chung Wong participated in an invitation-only seminar in Dagstuhl, Germany that brought together theoreticians and practitioners from around the world to discuss the studies of information visualization and their applications. The findings of the seminar will be released as a book published by Schloss Dagstuhl.  (Posted 9/1/2007)

fast

Jerome Fast invited to speak at the Gordon Research Conference

Jerome Fast was invited to speak at the Gordon Research Conference in July at Colby-Sawyer College, New Hampshire. Speakers at the Gordon Research Conferences are internationally-recognized leaders in their field and are invited to discuss the most recent advances in their research. The theme of this year's conference on radiation and climate was "Integrating multiscale measurements and models for key climate questions." In his presentation, Jerome discussed his recent research during a session on Regional Aerosol Models: Simulation of Chemical Weather.  (Posted 8/1/2007)

curie

Sotiris Xantheas Receives Marie Curie Fellowship - International Award to Share Expertise Abroad

Sotiris Xantheas was selected for a Marie Curie Fellowship for More Experienced Researchers within the Transfer of Knowledge Program. This award helps European institutions develop research capabilities by hosting expert researchers with specialized knowledge.

Through this fellowship, Sotiris will spend up to 2 months over the next 3 years at the Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL) in the Foundation for Research and Technology—Hellas in Heraklion, Crete, Greece. His travel and local expenses for those visits will be covered by the fellowship.

In his first visit, Sotiris is working with IESL's researchers on establishing a capability for calculating excited states of molecular and ionic clusters. Initial case studies include the accurate calculation of the excited states of pyrrole and its complexes with rare gas atoms (such as argon, krypton and xenon) to explain the qualitatively different results obtained during photofragment slice imaging experiments performed at IESL. These experiments suggest that the clustering with selected rare gas carrier atoms (such as krypton and xenon but not argon) can selectively quench N-H bond fission.

Pyrrole is an ideal model for the study of more complex systems. It is an important source of nitrogen fuel in coal and heavy oils and plays an important role in the synthesis of biologically active compounds and other complexes.

This research is quickly leading to published results. A joint experimental-theoretical paper based on the results of the calculations entitled "Photofragment slice imaging studies of pyrrole and the Xe...pyrrole cluster" has been accepted in the Journal of Chemical Physics.  (Posted 7/1/2007)

appointment

Subhash Singhal Appointed to National Academies' Committee

Subhash Singhal was named to a two-year term on the National Research Council's Technical Assessment Committee for the Army Research Laboratory (NRC is a branch of the prestigious National Academies). The committee assists the Army in assessing and improving the quality of its scientific and technical work. In his new role, Subhash will provide technical guidance to the Sensors and Electron Devices Panel.

Subhash, a Battelle Fellow and Director for PNNL's Fuel Cells Program, has conducted and managed major research, development and demonstration programs in advanced materials and energy conversion systems. He is author of more than 70 scientific publications and has edited 12 books, received 13 patents and given more than 205 invited presentations worldwide.  (Posted 7/1/2007)

PNNL Staff Members Help Shape Global Understanding of Climate Change

Ruby Leung
Ruby Leung
Mike Scott
Mike Scott
Tony Janetos
Tony Janetos
Several PNNL staff members are helping shape how the World views climate change through their contributions to the Fourth IPCC Climate Change 2007 Assessment Report. IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change), which was established by the United Nations and the World Meteorological Organization to provide information relevant to climate change, periodically issues reports to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date assessment of the current state of knowledge on climate change. Since January 2007, IPCC's three Working Groups have issued summaries for policy makers, with complete reports due later this year. PNNL participants include:

Working Group I, "The Physical Science Basis": Ruby Leung, contributing author.

Working Group II, "Impacts, Adaptation and Vulnerability": Mike Scott and Tony Janetos, lead authors; Liz Malone and Antionette Brenkert, contributing authors.

Working Group III, "Mitigation of Climate Change": Jae Edmonds, lead author; Hugh Pitcher and Leon Clarke, contributing authors; Liz Malone, review editor.

The depth and breadth of contribution demonstrates PNNL staff members' standing as world class experts and their influence on the scientific, technical and socio-economic understanding of climate change. Congratulations and thank you.

For more information, visit the IPCC website  (Posted 6/1/2007)

Bob Scherpelz Receives Award for Article in Russian Publication

Bob Scherpelz won an award for his article in the Russian journal Radiation Safety Problems. Russian counterparts submitted documents the team had prepared to the scientific journal published by the Mayak Production Association; subsequently the paper received the journal's Best Paper of the Year award.

The article is based on the team"s research to reconstruct radiation doses received by Mayak workers in the late 1940s and early 1950s. The Mayak site is similar to the Hanford Site. To reconstruct the doses, the team needed to determine the response characteristics of the film dosimeters used by the site more than 50 years ago. The article describes the calculations and experimental studies on the performance of the dosimeters.

Citation: Smetanin, MY, EK Vasilenko, IV Lyubarskaya, VA Knyazev, MV Gorelov, RI Scherpelz, and JJ Fix. 2006. "Calculation Experimental Studies of Energy and Angular Response of the Film Dosimeters used at the Mayak PA," Radiation Safety Problems No. 4, 2006, pp 46-59 (in Russian).  (Posted 6/1/2007)

gregory

PNNL Scientist Selected for National Engineering Symposium

Michelle L. Gregory has been selected to participate in the National Academy of Engineering's 2007 U.S. Frontiers of Engineering Symposium Sept. 24-26 at Microsoft Research in Redmond, Wash. The annual event brings together 100 of the nation's outstanding young engineers from industry, academia and government to collaborate in examining research challenges in various engineering fields and industry sectors.

Gregory is a leader in the field of computational linguistics. She uses computer science, mathematics and psychology to help bridge the gap between human and computer language processing, resulting in more natural-sounding speech synthesis and better speech recognition performance, as well as computational methods to model aspects of discourse. Gregory is widely published, has 2 patents and 4 pending, and also holds an adjunct teaching position at WSU-Tri-Cities.  (Posted 6/1/2007)

accomplishment

Thallapally and McGrail Article Places in April's Top Ten accessed on Chemical Communications' website

Praveen Thallapally and Pete McGrail's article "Sorption of nitrogen oxides in a nonporous crystal" was among the top ten accessed articles on Chemical Communications' website. Accessed 784 times in April, the article focuses on sensor applications and separation of nitrogen oxides (NOx). There is a growing need to stabilize global NOx atmospheric concentrations to help reduce their effect on earth's climate, similar to what is now widely acknowledged is needed for carbon dioxide.

Chemical Communications is the leading weekly journal for publications on important developments in the chemical sciences. Its feature articles and reviews are written by leading scientists within their field and summarize current topical interests or those of cross-disciplinary appeal.

These accomplishments are also announced on the ETD website  (Posted 5/25/2007)

roadmap

Paul Bredt and Terri Stewart Pave the Way for DOE Roadmap

Paul Bredt and Terri Stewart made significant contributions to DOE's Environmental Management (EM) Roadmap for the Office of Engineering and Technology. This document identifies technology gaps in the EM program, associated risks and proposed strategies to close the gaps and enable the DOE cleanup mission. Paul and Terri provided technical expertise for drafting the strategic initiatives surrounding nuclear waste processing and groundwater and soil remediation.

Paul leads the Advanced Processing and Applications Group, and his current research is focused on the behavior of multi-scaled interfacial systems. Terri leads the Environmental Biomarkers Initiative researching ways to use biomarkers to transform environmental science.  (Posted 5/1/2007)

zhou_presents

Xiao-Dong Zhou Presented Nanomaterials Knowledge at International Forum

Xiao-Dong Zhou presented as one of only four invited USA Early Career Participants at the 4th U.S.- Korea Forum on Nanotechnology. Zhou, a research scientist in PNNL's Energy Materials group, delivered an insightful presentation on "Nanomaterials for Energy Applications – Defect and Transport Properties in Nanoscale Oxides," at the April conference held in Hawaii.

The series of meetings focuses on sustainable nanotechnology and energy dealing with the design, synthesis, fabrication, and characterization of nano-materials. Other topics include devices and systems for energy applications such as fuel cells, batteries, hydrogen production and storage, and solar cells.  (Posted 4/1/2007)

kathmann

Shawn Kathmann invited to contribute to the new perspectives issue of Theoretical Chemistry Accounts

Shawn Kathmann has been invited to contribute to the new perspectives issue of Theoretical Chemistry Accounts. Shawn was one of just 33 chemists, mainly those whose publications began to appear in earnest in the 1996-1999 time frame, selected to write about emerging areas of theoretical chemistry being pursued by a new generation of scientists.

In his 13-page article, Shawn wrote about the chemical physics of reactions involved in nucleation - the general process of describing phase transformations e.g., from the vapor phase to the liquid phase.

"Nucleation occurs in the manufacture of everything from snow flakes to jet engines turbine blades," said the Staff Scientist. "Yet, there are a lot of questions concerning the underlying processes and mechanisms."

In his article, Shawn shares insights concerning rate constants, molecular interactions, statistical mechanics and their consequences on nucleation phenomena. His article, titled "Understanding the Chemical Physics of Nucleation," is one of the most viewed articles in the issue.

Being asked to share thoughts and ideas about the future directions of research is a chance to influence the direction of scientific understanding.

Citation: Kathmann, SM. 2006. "Understanding the Chemical Physics of Nucleation," Theoretical Chemistry Accounts 116:169-182. Abstract online.  (Posted 4/1/2007)

PNNL receives award from International Symposium on Spectral Sensing Research

PNNL received an award from the International Symposium on Spectral Sensing Research for best technical presentation of session (Surface Sensing and Monitoring). Steven Sharpe spoke on "Infrared Spectral Signatures for Stand-off Monitoring: Creation of a Quantitative Library, Its Utility and Limitations." This work was conducted by Tim Johnson and Robert Sams, both of the Fundamental Science Directorate, and Steven Sharpe, National Security Directorate. It was funded under the Office of Nonproliferation Research and Development (NA-22).  (Posted 4/1/2007)

bio_article

Biosensor Article Made Analytical Chemistry's Most Cited List

Guodong Liu and Yuehe Lin's article on an innovative biosensor for pesticides and nerve agents made the 2006 Top 20 Most Cited Articles in Analytical Chemistry. Their article "Biosensor Based on Self-Assembling Acetylcholinesterase on Carbon Nanotubes for Flow Injection/Amperometric Detection of Organophosphate Pesticides and Nerve Agents" appeared in the February 1, 2006, issue of the journal. The article is already being cited by other researchers.

The article discusses the construction of a sensor, composed of enzymes that self-assemble layer by layer onto tiny, hollow carbon tubes. When the sensor encounters organophosphates, the enzymes slow down. This reduced activity is transmitted as an electrochemical signal through the carbon nanotubes to an attached electrode. By reading the sensor's measurements, users can determine the concentration of organophosphates in environmental samples and biological fluids.  (Posted 4/1/2007)

gephart_invite

Roy Gephart invited by the National Academies to participate in workshop on radiation contamination and remediation issues

At the invitation of the National Academies, Roy Gephart, EMSL, is traveling to Russia with an eight-member U.S. team in early June to participate in a workshop, hosted by the National Academies and the Russian Academy of Sciences, on radiation contamination and remediation issues in the former Soviet Union. Cleanup problems will be assessed by the participants for six Russian sites: Kurchatov Institute, Lakes 10 and 11 at Mayak, Andreev Bay, Krasnokamensk Mining Enterprise (Siberia), Almaz Mining Enterprise (North Caucasus), and a site for testing peaceful nuclear explosions (Perm or Ivanovo region). Roy will lead one of the workshop's review sessions. The Russian Academy of Sciences will present the workshop recommendations to the Ecology Committee of the Russian National Security Council. The invitation to the workshop is a reflection of Roy's experience on addressing radioactive waste issues and providing his consultation and expertise to the National Academies and others.  (Posted 4/1/2007)

Two Journal Articles Make ACS Most-Cited List

Richard Barry
Richard Barry
Stephen Callister
Stephen Callister
Dick Smith
Dick Smith
Mary Lipton
Mary Lipton
Haixing Wang
Haixing Wang
Two articles by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory staff that appeared in the February 2006 issue of the Journal of Proteome Research are being featured as an American Chemical Society 2006 Most-Cited Article. These are articles published in ACS journals during 2006 that received the most citations in the same year, based on citation data obtained from Thomson Scientific. The two articles are:

  • "Normalization approaches for removing systematic biases associated with mass spectrometry and label-free proteomics," by Stephen Callister, Richard Barry, Josh Adkins, Ethan Johnson, Wei-Jun Qian, Bobbie-Jo Webb-Robertson, Dick Smith, and Mary Lipton.

Researchers investigated four techniques for normalizing peptide abundance measurements obtained from high-throughput liquid chromatography-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The peptides came from a protein sample, two Deinococcus radiodurans samples, and two mouse striatum samples. Before normalization, replicate runs from each sample set were statistically different, and after normalization, they were not. For most LC-FTICR MS analyses, linear regression normalization ranked either first or second among the four techniques, suggesting that it was more generally suitable for reducing systematic biases.

  • "Characterization of the mouse brain proteome using global proteomic analysis complemented with cysteinyl-peptide enrichment," by Haixing Wang, Wei-Jun Qian, Mark Chin, Vladislav Petyuk, Richard Barry, Tao Liu, Marina Gritsenko, Heather Mottaz, Ron Moore, Dave Camp, Arshad Khan, Desmond Smith, and Dick Smith.

Scientists from PNNL and the University of California-Los Angeles completed the first comprehensive characterization of the whole mouse brain proteome and the most comprehensive proteome coverage for the mammalian brain to date. They took a global proteomic approach for comprehensive profiling of the brain tissue using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and an extensive protein database for the whole mouse brain. The database generated from this study will be the basis for future quantitative brain proteomic studies using mouse models.

A most-cited article represents critical, new research results influencing the direction of scientific discovery.  (Posted 3/1/2007)

space

Tony Janetos Helps National Research Council Outline Future of Space-Based Earth Observations

As a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space, Dr. Anthony Janetos and his colleagues examined the government's long-term planning for space-based observations of Earth over the next 10 years. Their findings were released during the 2007 American Meteorological Society meeting. Earth Science and Applications from Space: National Imperatives for the Next Decade and Beyond recommended a number of fundamental improvements to existing observation and information systems to provide the United States with crucial scientific information for predicting severe storms and climate change effects. The study was commissioned by groups within the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and the U.S. Geological Survey.

Dr. Janetos served on the Executive Committee and chaired the Panel on Earth Science Applications and Societal Needs. He is the director of the Joint Global Climate Change Research Institute, a collaborative partnership between the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Maryland.  (Posted 1/1/2007)

 

2006 Awards

chief

Fredrickson Named GTL Chief Scientist

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Laboratory Fellow Jim Fredrickson was appointed Chief Scientist of the U.S. Department of Energy's Genomics: Genomes to Life (GTL) program. This is a new position created by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) at DOE in September 2005. As Chief Scientist, Dr. Fredrickson provides scientific leadership and guidance in coordination with the GTL Program Manager and other BER staff. His responsibilities include representing the GTL program's science at scientific meetings, with contributions to the scientific literature, and in interactions with national associations such as the National Academy of Sciences and the American Society for Microbiology.

Some of Fredrickson's activities and accomplishments in this new role include the following:

  • Co-organizer of the DOE Biomass to Biofuels Workshop hosted by BER and the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy December 6-9 in Rockville, Maryland. At the workshop, he gave a talk on "GTL Crosscutting Science Applied to Biomass." He is currently contributing to the final workshop report.

  • Participant in the National Academies Committee review of the GTL program in September. He presented the program's progress and potential and challenges it faces. He was instrumental in helping BER prepare key material that addressed specific questions by the committee.

  • Planning of and participation in the Joint Genomics: GTL Contractor-Grantee Workshop IV and Metabolic Engineering Working Group Interagency Conference on Metabolic Engineering 2006 February 12-15 in Bethesda, Maryland.

Fredrickson works closely with the DOE Program Manager and GTL scientists and is helping define GTL performance metrics, milestones, and expected outcomes. He also assists in preparing updated versions of the GTL Science Plan/Roadmap, which define the scientific direction and goals of the program.  (Posted 2/1/2006)

mentor

Andy Ward Earns Mickey Leland Mentoring Award

Andy Ward received the Office of Fossil Energy Mickey Leland Energy Fellowship Mentor Award. He was recognized for his loyal and dedicated service beyond the call of duty while serving as a mentor to college minority students focused in geology.

As a mentor, Andy established personal relationships with five interns over the summers of 2004 and 2005. He helped them develop long-term management skills, provided opportunities for students to interact with scientists from various backgrounds, and maintained regular interaction and consistent support.  (Posted 1/1/2006)

PNNL's Harold Tilden Named Hazardous Materials Manager of the Year

The Eastern Washington Chapter of the Academy of Certified Hazardous Materials Managers has announced its awards for 2006. PNNL's Harold Tilden, Environment, Safety, Health and Quality Directorate, was one of two Hazardous Materials Managers of the Year named by the chapter. Harold will be recognized at the chapter's awards ceremony Dec. 7, 2006.  (Posted 12/1/2006)

garner_mst

Frank Garner Receives Outstanding Achievement Award

Frank Garner was honored with the Outstanding Achievement Award by the Materials Science and Technology Division (MST) of the American Nuclear Society. The award recognizes Frank for his significant achievements within material science and technology and for his contributions to the development of nuclear energy.

Frank, who joined PNNL in 1987, was selected for this award, due to his sustained research in the field of structural materials behavior for nuclear fission and fusion systems. Frank's core expertise is in radiation effects on structural materials, and has made influential contributions on understanding the formation of defects in irradiated materials.  (Posted 11/1/2006)

PNNL Staff Members Help Richland Section Win 2006 National ACS ChemLuminary Award

PNNL staff members helped the Richland Section of the American Chemical Society win the 2006 ChemLuminary Award for Outstanding Advocacy on Behalf of Women in the Chemical Sciences. The chapter brought together 100+ middle school girls for a day-long "Girls in Science" event focused on analyzing evidence and forensics to illustrate chemistry in a tangible way. Other activities included a 2-day Girl/Boy Scouts Chemistry merit badges event, college student affiliate poster sessions and innovative local meetings, and hands-on chemistry events on the Umatilla Reservation. PNNL staff members who are section officers or committee chairs and who contributed to this effort include Sam Bryan, Janet Bryant, Tim Hubler, Bruce McNamara, Dennis Wester, Bill Samuel, Therese Clauss, Novella Bridges, Kayte Denslow, Rich Lucke and Amanda Kissire.  (Posted 10/1/2006)

smith_e

Eric Smith receives IEEE award for significant contributions to radiation instrumentation

Eric Smith was honored by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society as the recipient of the 2006 Radiation Instrumentation Early Career Award. This award recognizes individuals who have made significant and innovative technical contributions to the fields of radiation instrumentation and measurement techniques for ionizing radiation.

During the span of his career, Eric has made contributions in the areas of novel radiation detection development, advanced simulation methods and in the analysis of radiation detection scenarios. He has demonstrated leadership through participation in national panels and has authored more than 50 publications.

"Eric is still in the early part of career, but he has established himself as a national leader in advancing radiation detection instrumentation for national security applications," said Phil Gauglitz, technical group manager for Radiation Detection & Nuclear Sciences. "He has recently focused his efforts on developing analysis methods and tools to simulate the performance of radiation detectors during realistic scenarios of nuclear material smuggling. Eric's work is having a broad impact on the national research agenda and is also improving the performance of radiation detectors at our country's borders." Eric received the award at the IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium on Oct. 30, 2006.  (Posted 10/1/2006)

materials

Robbie Tidwell Receives Eastern Washington Chapter of the Academy of Certified Hazardous Materials Managers Champions of Excellence Award

Robbie Tidwell received the Eastern Washington Chapter of the Academy of Certified Hazardous Materials Managers Champions of Excellence Award. Her accomplishments include introducing the philosophy of certified hazardous materials managers to PNNL, giving talks around the Northwest on the dangers of household chemicals, and serving as vice president of the Chapter. In September, Robbie will receive her award at the national conference.  (Posted 9/1/2006)

chemical

American Chemical Society Honors Jean Futrell for Achievements in Mass Spectrometry

Jean Futrell, Battelle Fellow at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been chosen to receive the American Chemical Society's Frank H. Field and Joe L. Franklin Award for Outstanding Achievement in Mass Spectrometry. The award will be presented at the ACS national meeting in Chicago in March 2007.

Futrell was selected for his contributions to the theory and practice of mass spectroscopy. His work often focuses on developing or modifying instrumentation for specialized research purposes, including high-pressure and chemical-ionization mass spectrometers. Through this research, Futrell has addressed fundamental questions in mass spectrometry. Among his many contributions to mass spectrometry instrumentation is the invention of tandem mass spectrometry, a technique employed in most commercial mass spectrometers today. His current research involves collisional activation of complex ions in ion-surface interactions and surface modifications by ion capture.

Author of nearly 300 refereed journal articles and invited reviews, Futrell earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering at Louisiana Tech University in 1955, and a doctorate in physical chemistry at the University of California-Berkeley in 1958. He was the first permanent director of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a major DOE scientific user facility located at PNNL.  (Posted 9/1/2006)

samms

SAMMS Awarded American Chemical Society Regional Industrial Innovation Award

Glen Fryxell, Energy Science and Technology Directorate, is a recipient of the American Chemical Society Regional Industrial Innovation Award. Glen received the award for co-developing and commercializing Self-Assembled Monolayers on Mesoporous Supports, a powerful new class of sorbent materials that combines two novel technologies to selectively sequester heavy metals and radionuclides. SAMMS demonstrates great promise for rapid and effective chemical separation of complex mixtures and remediation of hazardous wastes. SAMMS is versatile and has proven effective for a wide range of applications in industry, medicine, and environmental cleanup. The world's largest scientific society, ACS advances the chemical enterprise and increases public understanding of chemistry.  (Posted 7/1/2006)

aviation

PNNL Scientists Win American Statistical Association Outstanding 2006 Statistical Application Award

Brett Amidan

PNNL scientists, Thomas Ferryman and Brett Amidan, have won the American Statistical Associations (ASA) Outstanding 2006 Statistical Application Award for development of The Morning Report: Advanced Proactive Safety and System Monitoring Tool. The Morning Report analyzes large datasets of aircraft information that aviation safety experts and airline policy makers use to determine subtle but potentially serious safety issues. The ASA presents the award annually for outstanding achievement in the physical, biological, or medical sciences.  (Posted 5/1/2006)

sriram

Sriram Somasundaram Named 2006 Tri-Cities Engineer of the Year

As part of National Engineers Week, Sriram Somasundaram was named Tri-Cities Engineer of the Year at the Tri-Cities Feb. 24 Engineers' Week banquet. The award was presented by the Tri-Cities Chapter of the Washington Society of Professional Engineers.

Sriram joined Battelle 17 years ago and works in the areas of energy efficiency in HVAC equipment and commercial buildings, combined heat and power technologies, thermal energy storage, and distributed power generation technologies. He has been named a Fellow in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and has received the society's Dedicated Service Award. Sriram also received the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers Homer Addams Award and Distinguished Service Award.

He is the founding secretary of the India Association of Tri-Cities and active in the Hindu Society of Eastern Washington.  (Posted 3/1/2006)

ywang2

Yong Wang Named Asian American Engineer of the Year

As part of National Engineers Week, Yong Wang was named the Asian American Engineer of the Year for his outstanding scientific achievements and contributions to his community. Yong was honored at the Feb. 25 national AAEOY banquet in Seattle.

Since joining the Lab ten years ago, Yong has developed highly active catalysts for microchannel reaction technologies in efforts to reduce energy consumption and environmental concerns in the chemical industry. He has authored more than 90 publications, received two R&D 100 Awards, a Presidential Green Chemistry Award, and holds 57 issued patents, with approximately 30 patents pending. He also contributes his leadership and time to the local Chinese American Association, Chinese Language School and Chinese Alliance Church.  (Posted 3/1/2006)

ashrae

PNNL Scientists Earn Distinguished Service Awards from American Society for Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers

Sriram Somasundaram

Sriram Somasundaram, Srinivas Katipamula and Michele Friedrich (not pictured) were presented with Distinguished Service Awards from the American Society for Heating, Refrigeration, and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE).

This award recognizes ASHRAE members who have served the Society faithfully and with distinction on committees or have otherwise given freely of their time and talent on behalf of the Society. The awards were presented at the Society's Annual Meeting in Quebec City, Canada, during the Plenary Session on Saturday, June 24, 2006.  (Posted 2/1/2006)

security

PNNL's Larry Runyon Awarded 2005 Council Chairman of the Year Award for Leadership

Larry Runyon, deputy chief of Counterintelligence, National Security Directorate, has been awarded a 2005 Council Chairman of the Year award for his leadership of the American Society for Industrial Security International's Information Asset Protection Council. In addition, the Council he leads received a Distinguished Achievement Award. Both were formally recognized at the ASIS International 2006 Volunteer Leadership Conference in Washington, D.C. Larry's Council promotes programs and best practices to assist organizations in protecting sensitive info assets from careless/unauthorized disclosure and unlawful/unethical acquisition. ASIS is the premiere organization for security practitioners.  (Posted 1/1/2006)

early

Craig Aalseth Receives International Early Achievement Award

Craig Aalseth, a senior research scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has received the Early Achievement Award from the IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society, a prestigious international award given every two years.

Aalseth joined PNNL in 1998 as a graduate research fellow and became a permanent staff member in 2002. His most notable technical leadership is through significant roles in the Majorana Collaboration, a proposed next-generation double-beta decay probe of neutrino mass, and in working to develop an advanced ultratrace radionuclide detection capability.  (Posted 1/1/2006)

acs

PNNL Scientist Receives Leadership Development Award from ACS

Kayte Denslow, a scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been selected to receive a Leadership Development Award from the Younger Chemists Committee of the American Chemical Society. The award enables her to participate in a YCC Leadership Development Workshop in late January held in conjunction with the ACS Leaders Conference in Baltimore, Md. This YCC program recognizes emerging leaders in the profession and helps them prepare for the leadership opportunities at volunteer organizations, such as ACS, and in their professional career. According to the notification letter from YCC Chair Katherine Glasgow, "YCC recognizes your past contributions and your leadership qualities. The committee also believes that you have tremendous potential to be a successful leader."  (Posted 1/1/2006)

vasquez_p

Peggy Vasquez selected in national competition for America's Next Top Administrative Professionals

Peggy Vasquez, Executive Assistant for the Director of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, was one of three national finalists for the America's Next Top Administrative Professional Award, in conjunction with the 14th annual Administrative Professionals Conference. The award acknowledges three exceptional administrative candidates from a national pool of nominees, who were judged on their contribution to the team, dedication to colleagues and clients, and multi-tasking abilities to advance the goals of the company and its values. Peggy has been asked to serve as a member of the selection committee for next year's Top Administrative Professional Award.  (Posted 12/1/2006)

Battelle Fellow Subhash Singhal Recognized for Outstanding Contributions to Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Technology

In addition to receiving the Christian Friedrich Schoenbein Gold Medal from the European Fuel Cell Forum, Singhal has been appointed to the editorial board of Elsevier's Journal of Power Sources; honored by the American Chemical Society with a symposium on chemistry of fuel cells in his name at its meeting in San Francisco, awarded Joint ASM International/Indian Institute of Metals Visiting Lecture Award by ASM International for 2006, appointed a member of the peer committee on materials engineering for a three-year term (2006-2009) by the National Academy of Engineering, appointed chair of the publications committee by the Electrochemical Society for a four-year term (2006-2010), and listed in Marquis Who's Who in Science and Engineering 2006-2007.  (Posted 10/1/2006)

lai_sheng

Lai-Sheng Wang Receives 2006 Humboldt Research Award

The Alexander von Humboldt Foundation presents up to 100 of these awards annually and invites the recipients to conduct research projects of their choice in Germany for six months to a year.

An Affiliate Chief Scientist in the Fundamental Science Directorate at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a professor of physics at Washington State University-Tri-Cities, Lai-Sheng is a world leader in nanoclusters research. For example, Lai-Sheng and his colleagues created hollow nanoscale cages of gold atoms, the first known metallic equivalent of the buckyball. In addition, he pioneered the study of multiply charged negative ions and began the study of solution molecules in the gas phase.

During his 20 years in research, he has written or co-written more than 240 publications. His work is often featured in top journals, including Science and Nature. He is active in professional societies, including the American Chemical Society, American Physical Society, Materials Research Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 2003, he was named a fellow in the American Physical Society.

His work as a researcher and a professor has been recognized with several important awards, including the Guggenheim fellowship, Washington State University distinguished faculty award, the National Science Foundation creativity award, and the Alfred P. Sloan research fellowship.  (Posted 10/1/2006)

singhal

PNNL Researcher Receives Highest Fuel Cell Honor

Schoenbein Medal honors achievements of Subhash Singhal

Fuel cell pioneer Subhash Singhal, a Battelle Fellow and Director, Fuel Cells at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has received the Christian Friedrich Schoenbein Gold Medal for his outstanding contributions to solid oxide fuel cell technology. The biennial award is the highest honor presented by the European Fuel Cell Forum.

The medal is named for the Swiss scientist who is credited with identifying the fundamental chemistry of fuel cells and, together with Sir William Robert Grove, for the creation of the fuel cell in 1839.

Singhal joined PNNL in April 2000 after nearly 30 years at Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation, where he led development of solid oxide fuel cell technology from a laboratory curiosity to fully integrated 200 kW power generation systems. At PNNL, Singhal provides senior technical, managerial and commercialization leadership to the laboratory's fuel cell program.

A member of the National Academy of Engineering, Singhal is a Fellow of four professional societies — American Ceramic Society, Electrochemical Society, ASM International, and American Association for the Advancement of Science — and a senior member of TMS, the Mineral, Metals & Materials Society. He also has served on numerous national and international advisory panels.

Singhal has authored more than 75 scientific publications, edited 13 books, received 13 patents and delivered over 225 plenary, keynote and other invited presentations worldwide. He is an adjunct professor in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Utah and serves on the Visiting Advisory Board of the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Florida.

The award was presented to Singhal by Professor John Kilner, chairman of the Seventh European Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Forum and Ulf Bossel, chairman of the European Fuel Cell Forum during the closing ceremony of the forum's July meeting in Lucerne, Switzerland.  (Posted 8/1/2006)

climate

PNNL Scientist Lead Organizer for Workshop to Identify Future Steps for Next Generation of Regional Climate Modeling

PNNL scientist Ruby Leung was the lead organizer of the international, invitation-only Regional Climate Modeling workshop "Research Needs and Directions of Regional Climate Modeling Using WRF and CCSM" held March 22-23, in Boulder, Colorado. Bill Kuo, Phil Merilees, and Joe Tribbia, National Center for Atmospheric Research, were co-organizers of the workshop, which was sponsored by NCAR's Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology and Climate and Global Dynamics Divisions.

More than 60 scientists from the United States and across the world attended the workshop to discuss the future steps needed to advance the state of the science in regional climate modeling.  (Posted 6/1/2006)

hci

Olga Anna Kuchar Selected to Participate in National Academy of Engineering 2006 U.S. Frontiers of Engineering Symposium

Olga Anna Kuchar, Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, has been selected to participate in the National Academy of Engineering's 2006 U.S. Frontiers of Engineering Symposium. The three-day symposium, to be held in Dearborn, Michigan in September, brings together a select group of the nation's outstanding young engineers from industries, universities and government laboratories. Olga currently is conducting research on methods for teaching computers to solve problems like humans do; that is, strategizing, identifying hidden relationships or patterns in data, and associating and applying different areas of knowledge to the problem. This methodology is achieved through mathematical and logical techniques that can be converted to computer code. She also conducts research on improving human understanding of information through visualizations, applying game-based techniques to real-world issues, and encoding graph storyboards for quick data pattern identification.  (Posted 6/1/2006)

spectrum

Wayne Martin Named One of Top Minorities in Science of 2006

Wayne Martin received Science Spectrum's Trailblazer 2006 Top Minorities in Research Science award. This award honors Hispanic, Asian American, Native American, and Black professionals in the science arena whose leadership and innovative thinking on the job and in the community extend throughout their industry. For more than 25 years, Wayne has conducted, directed, and led research in subsurface contaminant migration and waste storage. He is also a supporter of educational activities including Chair of the Board of Trustees for Columbia Basin College, the National Urban League's Black Executive Exchange, the WSU Tri-Cities Advisory Council, and the Black Engineer of the Year Awards Conference.  (Posted 5/1/2006)

emerald

Abrefah Receives Emerald Honors Award for Outstanding Scientific Accomplishments

John Abrefah received the Emerald Honors Award for Professional Achievement during the 2006 Minorities in Research Science Conference. This award is given to a highly experienced, mid-career scientist who has made significant discoveries, made important advances in his career, and is acknowledged as a leader of large research and development initiatives. John was selected for this honor because of his outstanding research activities in nuclear material science and engineering. He was also chosen because of his involvement in national professional organizations including the American Nuclear Society, National Organization for the Professional Advancement of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers, American Society for Testing Materials and National Technical Advisory Group for International Standard Organization.  (Posted 5/1/2006)

miracle

Ann Miracle Joins Editorial Board of International Publication

Congratulations to ETD's Ann Miracle for being selected to serve a three-year term on the editorial board of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. As a board member, Ann will review aquatic toxicology related manuscripts that are submitted for publication. In this role, she will review 15 to 20 manuscripts a year.

Ann was chosen for this position because of her expertise in environmental sentinels. At PNNL, Ann leads the Lab's efforts in predicting ecosystem change and damage. In addition, she is involved in national and international workshops dealing with the use of genomics technologies to solve environmental issues.  (Posted 1/1/2006)

 

2006 Fellowships

Five PNNL Researchers Elected Fellows by AAAS

Jim Fredrickson
Jim Fredrickson
Dick Smith
Dick Smith
SK Sundaram
SK Sundaram
Bill Weber
Bill Weber
John Zachara
John Zachara
Five scientists from PNNL have been elected Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Each was elected Fellow in separate sections of the AAAS. Jim Fredrickson was elected a Fellow in biological sciences. Dick Smith and S. K. Sundaram were elected Fellows in the AAAS sections for chemistry and engineering, respectively. Bill Weber was elected a Fellow in physics, while John Zachara was elected in the AAAS section for geology and geography.

Election as an AAAS Fellow is determined by peer reviewers. Fellows are honored for "meritorious efforts to advance science or its applications." AAAS began honoring its distinguished members with the title of Fellow in 1874.

Jim Fredrickson is a Laboratory Fellow and the Chief Scientist in the Fundamental Science Directorate. He is being recognized for "leadership in the field of microbial ecology and environmental microbiology, with emphasis on subsurface microbiology and biogeochemistry."

He also serves as the Chief Scientist for DOE's Genomics: Genomes to Life program and is the Subprogram Coordinator for DOE's Subsurface Science Program. He has been with PNNL since 1985.

Dick Smith is a Battelle Fellow and Chief Scientist in FSD. He is being recognized for "leadership in analytical chemistry, specifically in the deployment of advanced separation methods with high-performance mass spectrometry for high-throughput proteomics."

He also serves as the director of the National Institute for Health Research Resource for Integrative Proteomics and is an adjunct professor of chemistry at Washington State University and the University of Utah; and an affiliate professor of chemistry at the University of Idaho.

S.K. Sundaram is the Chief Materials Scientist in the Environmental Technology Directorate. He is being recognized for "leadership and innovative contributions to a diverse cross-section of materials sciences, particularly new tools for synthesis and characterization of novel materials, diagnostics, and nanomaterials."

He joined PNNL in 1994 as a post-doctoral fellow and then as a senior research scientist in 1996. He was named chief materials scientist in 2002. He also serves as an adjunct faculty member in the School of Mechanical and Materials engineering for WSU and has visiting appointments at MIT, Harvard, and Princeton.

Bill Weber is a Laboratory Fellow in FSD. He is being recognized for "leadership and innovative research on defects, ion-solid interactions, and radiation effects in ceramics, particularly modeling and simulations of radiation damage processes."

He joined PNNL in 1977. Currently he is the Team Leader for the Material Interfaces Group and serves as the Chair of PNNL's Council of Fellows and the laboratory's Publication Advisory Committee.

John Zachara is the Senior Chief Scientist for environmental chemistry in FSD. He is being recognized for "distinguished contributions to environmental science, particularly for his work on the chemical and microbial processes affecting subsurface contaminant transport at the Hanford site in Washington state.

He is a chief scientist for in-ground contaminants on the Hanford Remediation and Closure Science project and is a member of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory Advisory Committee.

All five honorees will be recognized at the Fellows Forum at the AAAS national meeting in San Francisco in February. They join 15 current Battelle staff members previously elected as AAAS Fellows. Founded in 1848, AAAS has worked to advance science for human well-being through its projects, programs and publications in the areas of science policy, science education and international scientific cooperation. Science magazine is the chief publication of the AAAS, reviewing and publishing many of the top research papers in the biological and physical sciences. Science was established by Thomas Edison in 1880, and has the highest paid circulation of any scientific journal in the world.

You can read more about these elections in the PNNL Newsroom.  (Posted 11/1/2006)

kouzes_ieee

PNNL's Richard Kouzes Elected Fellow by IEEE

A nuclear physicist at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been elected a Fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. Richard Kouzes is being recognized for his "contributions to nuclear radiation detection systems."

Fellow status is conferred upon IEEE members with an extraordinary record of accomplishments in any of the IEEE fields of interest. The organization first began electing Fellows in 1912. Currently, fewer than two percent of the organization's 356,000 members hold the grade of Fellow.

Kouzes is a Laboratory Fellow and Chief Scientist in PNNL's Computational and Information Sciences Directorate. He earned a bachelor's degree in physics from Michigan State University in 1969; and a master's degree and doctorate in physics from Princeton University in 1972 and 1975, respectively. He originally joined PNNL in 1991, and returned to the Laboratory in 2000.

As the principal investigator and technical lead for the Radiation Portal Monitoring Project at PNNL, Kouzes guided the project team's work to define the threat of illicit radioactive and nuclear materials at U.S. borders on behalf of U.S. Customs and Border Protection, identify the equipment needed, and initiate the modeling and testing activities that led to the successful deployment of radiation detection equipment along the country's borders.

Kouzes has been an active participant in the IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society (NPSS) for 25 years, has served as both an elected and appointed member of the Administrative Committee, was a founder of one of the technical committees, and has served as the society's webmaster for the past six years. He also has been a member of the IEEE Computer Society and the IEEE Standards Association.  (Posted 11/1/2006)

heating

Somasundaram Elected ASHRAE Fellow

Sriram Somasundaram has been elevated to the level of Fellow in the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE). Fellow is a membership grade that recognizes distinction in the arts and sciences of heating, ventilation, air conditioning or refrigeration and is earned through achievement as a researcher, designer, educator or engineering executive. It is conferred upon approval by the Society's Honors and Awards Committee and the Board of Directors. Approximately 500 of ASHRAE's 55,000 members are Fellows.

Sriram joined Battelle 17 years ago and works in the areas of energy efficiency in HVAC equipment and commercial buildings, combined heat and power technologies, thermal energy storage, and distributed power generation technologies. He has been named a Fellow in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and has received the society's Dedicated Service Award. Sriram also received the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers Homer Addams Award and Distinguished Service Award.

He is the founding secretary of the India Association of Tri-Cities and active in the Hindu Society of Eastern Washington.  (Posted 7/1/2006)

 

2006 Elected Positions and Offices

ankrum_coord

Al Ankrum to lead consortium of four national labs providing technical assistance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission

Al Ankrum was selected as program coordinator for a consortium of four national labs that have joined efforts to provide technical assistance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission for new reactor licensing. The four laboratories are PNNL, Brookhaven, Oak Ridge and Argonne, and they anticipate substantial involvement in reviewing and evaluating the construction/operating license applications for as many as 20 new nuclear power reactors in the United States over the next few years. The estimated level of effort is about $80 million. Nineteen companies have announced they will seek licenses to build new power plants in the United States, with the first applications to be submitted to NRC in late 2007. Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman recently announced that DOE would provide $2 billion in federal risk insurance to companies applying to build nuclear power plants, part of a package of government incentives designed to encourage the building of the country's first nuclear reactors since the 1970s. "This is a positive sign for nuclear energy domestically after more than 30 years without construction of a new reactor in this country," says Al, who is PNNL's relationship manager for the NRC.  (Posted 10/18/2006)

Ray Wildung Appointed by the Secretary of Energy to the Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee

Ray Wildung

Ray Wildung has been appointed by the Secretary of Energy to the Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. BERAC provides advice to the Director of the Office of Science on the many complex scientific and technical issues that arise in the development and implementation of the biological and environmental research program. Ray, a past recipient of the DOE E.O. Lawrence Award, was nominated to this committee because of his research experience and accomplishments in building a fundamental understanding of the long-term behavior of environmental contaminants from energy development and nuclear-defense activities. Ray will be asked to provide advice based on his expertise in the fields of soil science, microbiology, geochemistry and environmental remediation.

 (Posted 4/1/2006)

sullivan_sigma

PNNL's Kelly O. Sullivan Elected to Board of Directors of Sigma Xi

PNNL's Kelly O. Sullivan, director of institutional partnerships at PNNL, has been elected to the board of directors of Sigma Xi, the international honor society of science and engineering. She will serve a three-year term beginning July 1, 2007, and represent Sigma Xi area groups, as well as chapters at industries and state and federal laboratories. Sullivan is affiliated with the Tri-Cities Washington Chapter of Sigma Xi and serves on the society's Strategic Planning Committee.

She joined PNNL in 2001 and is responsible for developing and maintaining collaborations and partnerships with colleges and universities that help the laboratory achieve its missions. Prior to coming to PNNL, Sullivan was a chemistry professor at Mankato State University in Minnesota and at Creighton University in Nebraska. She directed the Creighton Chemistry Players, a team of faculty and students who brought the excitement of chemistry to children and adults through theatre and music. Her research interests focus on the electronic structure of small molecules and ions. Sullivan serves on several national advisory boards to various education-related initiatives and is a speaker on career development for women scientists.

She received a B.S. from Christian Brothers College and a Ph.D. from Texas Tech University. She is a member of the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, the American Chemical Society, the Association for Women in Science, the American Geophysical Union, and other professional societies.  (Posted 12/1/2006)

gracio_ieee

Deborah Gracio Appointed to Drive Strategy for IEEE Committee

PNNL's Deborah Gracio has been named as a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Information Technology Strategy Committee (ITSC). The ITSC is a standing committee that works to facilitate the development, maintenance and future implementation of an IT strategic plan for the IEEE.

For two years beginning in January, 2007, Deborah and the ITSC will be responsible for forming subject matter working groups relevant to specific areas in the strategic plan and reporting their recommendations to the IEEE Board of Directors. Deborah's cutting edge technical and management credentials and broad background in computer systems integration and scientific computing made her an excellent choice for this appointment.  (Posted 11/1/2006)

peden_acs

Chuck Peden Elected 2008 Chair of the American Chemical Society Catalysis Secretariat

The secretariat regularly organizes and cosponsors symposia at the national meetings of the ACS, but equally important is the Secretariat's role in integrating ACS divisions' activities concerned with catalysis and surface science to encourage comprehensive coverage of these subjects at ACS national meetings. Chuck's election as chair of the CATL is due, in part, to his longstanding contributions to catalysis science and engineering. He is particularly well-known as a leader in fundamental and applied studies of catalytic materials and processes for the control of vehicle exhaust emissions. His work has spanned the range from basic science, including ultrahigh vacuum surface science experiments on model single crystal catalysts, to applications-oriented efforts that are impacting the practical implementation of new "lean-NOx" reduction technologies.  (Posted 11/1/2006)

gasper_assd

Dan Gaspar to Chair Division of American Vacuum Society

Dan Gaspar was elected as the 2007 Chair-elect for the Applied Surface Science Division (ASSD) of the American Vacuum Society. This non-profit, national division's mission is to provide a forum for research and education in the preparation, characterization, modification and utilization of surfaces and interfaces in practical applications.

In his new role, Dan's responsibilities include presiding at all business meetings of the Division, submission of an annual report to the AVS Board of Directors, appointing chairs and members of Division committees and authorizing expenditures. Dan is also serving on the ASSD program committee and as the ASSD Strategic Planning committee chair.

Dan's extensive background in materials characterization and the application of surface analysis methods to address real-world challenges, in addition to his current responsibilities as technical group manager of the Materials Chemistry and Surface Research Group made him an excellent choice for this notable achievement.  (Posted 11/1/2006)

nuclear

John Abrefah to Serve Consecutive Term on American Nuclear Society Publications Committee

John Abrefah has accepted the reappointment to serve on the Publications, Meetings, Proceeding and & Transactions Committee for the American Nuclear Society. On this committee, John's tasks will involve ensuring technical meetings meet the society's standards for technical and scientific contributions.  (Posted 8/1/2006)

trends

American Physical Society Appoints Chair for Committee on Careers and Professional Development

John Orrell has been appointed chair of the Committee on Careers and Professional Development for the American Physical Society. As chair, John will lead a nine-person team that monitors job market health and trends for physicists and provides modest career development resources. This appointment caps a three-year term. During his time on the committee, John has helped develop Best Practices for universities establishing programs that encourage physics students to explore a wider range of careers available. The committee also has been creating a career development guide for students and researchers that helps them improve non-technical skills.  (Posted 7/1/2006)

mikey

Michaele "Mikey" Brady Raap Elected to the American Nuclear Society Board of Directors

Michaele "Mikey" Brady Raap has been elected to the American Nuclear Society's (ANS) Board of Directors in a national election by ANS members. She previously served on the ANS Board from 1998 to 2001. Mikey is the technical project lead at PNNL for nuclear criticality safety evaluations that support the design of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility for converting weapons materials to commercial-grade fuel. Her three-year term on the board will begin in June (See full article...).  (Posted 5/1/2006)

asms

Julia Laskin Appointed to American Society for Mass Spectrometry Board of Directors

Julia Laskin has been appointed to the American Society for Mass Spectrometry Board of Directors. The ASMS promotes and disseminates knowledge of mass spectrometry and allied topics. It currently includes more than 5,500 scientists involved in research and development. Julia will act as treasurer of the Board, making her responsible for funds and annual budget preparation. Julia has been a member of ASMS since 1999. Her research interests focus on the fundamental aspects of collisional activation and dissociation of protonated model peptides. Her research efforts emphasize activation of large ions in a single collision with surfaces using a specially designed Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.  (Posted 4/1/2006)

Don Baer Named to Editorial Advisory Board of Surface and Interface Analysis

Don Baer has been named to the editorial advisory board of Surface and Interface Analysis. The journal is devoted to the publication of papers dealing with the development and application of techniques for the characterization of surfaces, interfaces and thin films. Don has frequently published with his collaborators in this journal and will serve in this capacity with more than 20 of his colleagues from national and international academic, industrial, and government institutions.  (Posted 12/1/2006)

napier_epa

Bruce Napier to Advise Environmental Protection Agency

This committee provides advice on the science and technology of protecting people and the environment from radiation exposure. In addition, the committee comments on the science of radiation studies, which are critical to the nation's environmental regulations and policies.

The committee selected Bruce because of his experience and reputation for tackling complex issues. For nearly 30 years, Bruce has developed and operated models on the environmental transport of radiological and chemical contaminants.  (Posted 11/1/2006)

young_ied

Young Appointed to National Research Committee on Improvised Explosive Devices

Jonathan Young has accepted an appointment to the National Research Council Standing Committee on Operational Science and Technology Options for Defeating Improvised Explosive Devices (IED). The committee organizes studies to research, develop and implement advanced science and technologies to defeat the growing threats and strategies used to assemble and deploy IEDs. Jonathan will provide risk assessment and system engineering expertise.

Jonathan's years of experience in systems and safety engineering, safety analysis and his international recognition as a probabilistic safety assessor make him an excellent choice to serve on this committee.  (Posted 11/1/2006)

ghan_agu

Steve Ghan Appointed to Journal of Geophysical Research Editorial Board

Steve Ghan was appointed to a 4-year term as editor for the Atmospheres section of the Journal of Geophysical Research, published by the American Geophysical Union (AGU). In his role as editor, Ghan has authority to accept or reject papers, as well as the responsibility for attracting new and interesting research to the journal. Along with fellow editors, Ghan will play a critical role in assuring the journal continues to be the most important in its field, and serve the needs of both authors and readers.

In his congratulatory letter, AGU President Tim Killeen stated that the search committee spoke highly of Ghan's commitment to improve the journal, notably by promoting additional special sections devoted to specific research areas. They also noted that Ghan's broad research interests and ties to the international research community made him especially qualified to enhance the interdisciplinary aspects of the journal. Ghan joined Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in 1990 and focuses his research on climate modeling.

The AGU is a worldwide scientific community that, through cooperative research, advances the understanding of earth and space for the benefit of humanity. It publishes more than a dozen peer-reviewed journals ranging from earth and oceans to atmosphere, space, and planets.  (Posted 11/1/2006)

nih_panel

Steven Wiley Joins National Institutes of Health Scientific Review Panel

Effective September 28, 2006, he will serve a 4-year term on the Genomics, Computational Biology and Technology (GCAT) Study Section. Study sections review grant applications submitted to the NIH, make recommendations on the applications to the appropriate NIH council or board, and survey the status of research in their fields of science. Members are selected on the basis of demonstrated competence and achievement in their scientific discipline, as evidenced by quality of research accomplishments, publications in scientific journals, and other significant scientific activities, achievements, and honors. The GCAT will consider research grant applications involving global and integrative analyses of biological systems, and the development of new computational and experimental methods. Wiley leads PNNL's systems biology program, developing and leveraging PNNL's unique capabilities in cell imaging, computational biology, and high throughput proteomics to understand cell communication. He was recently named biology lead for the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at PNNL. Wiley is the author or co-author of more than 130 scientific journal articles, review articles, and book chapters.  (Posted 10/1/2006)

mandelbrot

Benoit Mandelbrot Decorated as Officer in National Order of the Legion of Honor

Benoit Mandelbrot, one of the world's most influential mathematicians and a Battelle Fellow, recently participated in two events. In Paris, Benoit attended a ceremony held by his alma mater, École Polytechnique, where he was decorated as an Officer in the National Order of the Legion of Honor. Benoit was awarded this honor for his legendary work in fractals and contributions to mathematics. The Order, founded by Napoleon Bonaparte, recognizes eminent service to the Republic of France. This is the French equivalent to the National Academy of Science. In Madrid, Benoit gave a plenary talk on "The Nature of Roughness in Mathematics, Science and Art" at the International Congress of Mathematicians. The event attracted a large number of participants, students and mathematicians. ICM is a scientific event that brings together mathematicians from all over the world, and demonstrates the vital role that mathematicians play in our society.  (Posted 9/1/2006)

Carbaugh Shaping National Policy to Monitor and Decontaminate People after a Nuclear Event

Gene Carbaugh has been appointed to the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements study providing recommendations for monitoring people exposed during a nuclear or radiological incident, such as nuclear reactor accident or a dirty bomb detonation. Gene will also help develop methodologies to decontaminate those exposed. The work will help the U.S. government if it is ever forced to respond to a nuclear or radiological incident.

A certified health physicist, Gene was selected for this study because he has 30 years experience in applied internal dosimetry, radiological and environmental safety, radiation measurements and their interpretation, and nuclear reactor maintenance and construction.  (Posted 8/1/2006)

PNNL Researcher Seeks to Enhance Human and Technology Interactions

Tom Sanquist, NSD Staff Research Scientist located in Seattle, has been appointed a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Human-System Design Support for Changing Technology. The appointment runs from 2005 to 2007. The committee is chartered to develop a vision for incorporating human factors engineering considerations into the design process for complex systems, especially in view of technologies that are changing rapidly and increasing in complexity.

The committee members will consider techniques for an integrated, interdisciplinary, adaptable human-system design methodology and tools that can be applied in both civilian and military arenas. A report will be issued by the committee in 2007 with recommendations on a program of research and development required to achieve its findings.

Tom's research at PNNL focuses on the use of analytic and experimental methods for designing and evaluating user interactions with complex systems. He has applied his expertise to intelligence analysis, security systems, transportation, imaging devices, satellite control systems, nuclear power plants, and military command and control. Tom has designed and implemented significant large-scale systems such as the Air Force Satellite Control Network user interface and has performed a variety of human factors work for the Radiation Portal Monitoring Program.  (Posted 8/1/2006)

catalyst

János Szanyi Appointed to Editorial Advisory Board of Catalysis Letters

János Szanyi was appointed to the Editorial Advisory Board of Catalysis Letters, a widely circulated journal that publishes rapid communications in the broad field of catalysis for the international community. As a member, János will advise the editors on matters concerning the journal, help in gathering quality publications, and review contributed manuscripts. He was chosen for this position because of his contributions and basic research on real and model catalyst systems.  (Posted 7/1/2006)

kudo

Jim Fredrickson Appointed to NRC Committee

PNNL Fellow Jim Fredrickson has accepted a provisional appointment as a member of the National Research Council's Committee on the Astrobiology Strategy for the Exploration of Mars. The appointment runs January 2006-September 2007. The committee will undertake a study that defines a scientific strategy for the search for life on Mars. The members will consider techniques appropriate to the detection of extinct or extant life in situ and in the laboratory. Jim's research includes the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry subsurface environments using geochemical and molecular approaches.  (Posted 7/1/2006)

greenhouse

Jim Dooley Appointed to Editorial Board for International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control

Jim Dooley was appointed to the editorial board for the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, the first peer reviewed journal to focus on carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies. As a member of the editorial board, Jim's principal responsibility is to assist the journal editors with the refereeing of newly submitted articles. He also will encourage CCS researchers to submit their work to the journal. Jim was chosen for this position because of his cutting edge research on CCS and the role of this class of technologies in addressing climate change for PNNL's Joint Global Change Research Institute and Global Energy Technology Strategy projects. He also was chosen because of his role as the lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage.  (Posted 6/1/2006)

fellow

Ellis Appointed to Canadian NMR Advisory Board

Laboratory Fellow Paul Ellis has been invited to a 3-year appointment as a member of the International Advisory Board for the National Ultrahigh-Field NMR Facility for Solids, a joint facility of the National Research Council Canada and the University of Ottawa. The board meets yearly to review the facility operations and provide comments, suggestions, and recommendations on operations. Dr. Ellis chairs the board; other members are Jean-Paul Amoureux (National Superior School of Chemistry in Lille, France) and Mark Smith (University of Warwick, UK).

Dr. Ellis attended a board meeting June 2 in Ottawa that was held in conjunction with dedication of the NMR Facility's 900-MHz spectrometer, which is the only one in Canada dedicated to the study of solids.  (Posted 6/1/2006)

evergreen

Chartrand Elected Vice President of InfraGard's Evergreen Chapter in Washington State

Greg Chartrand, a counterintelligence officer at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been elected Vice President of InfraGard's Evergreen Chapter in Washington State. InfraGard is a partnership between the FBI and the private sector that was established to share information and intelligence regarding critical infrastructures. Chartrand specializes in information sciences and special technologies. He is the first PNNL employee to serve in the role of vice president of InfraGard's Evergreen chapter.  (Posted 4/1/2006)

exposure

Bruce Napier to Chair Committee for National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements

Bruce Napier has been appointed Chair of a National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements committee preparing a report on fundamental principles of dose reconstruction. The report will discuss the scientific process of figuring out past radiation exposures of specific individuals.

Bruce was chosen for this position because of his experience in environmental radiation dose reconstruction. For the past 18 years, he has worked on projects collaborating with epidemiological studies, investigating the effects of radiation exposure on the public around both Hanford and the equivalent Russian nuclear facility at Mayak. Bruce is also the chair of both the US-Ukraine and US-Belarus Bi-National Advisory Groups for Chernobyl Studies.  (Posted 3/1/2006)

analysis

Richard Benedick Appointed to National Research Council Committee on Analysis of Global Change Assessments

Richard Benedick has been appointed to a National Research Council committee on Analysis of Global Change Assessments. The committee will identify lessons learned from past assessments to guide future global change assessment activities of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program.

Richard was chosen for this position because of his experience in the State Department where he was responsible for U.S. international environmental policies and negotiations, as well as his work on climate policy at PNNL's Joint Global Change Research Institute. He was the chief U.S. negotiator and a principal architect of the historic Montreal Protocol on protection of the ozone layer, and the Special Advisor to Secretaries-General of both the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development and the International Conference on Population and Development.  (Posted 3/1/2006)

 

2005 Awards

zhang

Yanwen Zhang Receives 2005 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers

Yanwen Zhang, a materials physicist at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, today received the 2005 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers -- the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on outstanding scientists and engineers beginning their independent careers. Zhang and 55 other recipients were honored by President Bush earlier today and received their awards from John Marburger, director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy.

To be eligible for the presidential award, Zhang first had to be selected by the Department of Energy for its Early Career Scientist and Engineer Award. As a PECASE recipient, Zhang receives a committment from DOE's Office of Science to continue funding the research for which the award was given for five years.

Zhang's research focuses on interactions of energetic ions with solid materials and how those interactions can be applied to the analysis and study of those materials. Zhang developed a novel way of measuring the energy loss of atomic particles as they pass through materials. Accurate measurements of such energy loss were a long-standing problem until Zhang successfully used high-resolution, time-of-flight spectroscopy to determine energy loss over a continuous range of energies.

Because energy loss of high-energy particles is fundamental to irradiation effects, radiation detection, and electronic device manufacturing, Zhang's discoveries have potential applications in nuclear power, national security, nuclear waste management and energy efficient electronics. Zhang, whose research is supported by DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, is a staff scientist in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a scientific user facility at PNNL.

The presidential award embodies the high priority placed by the government on maintaining the leadership position of the United States in science by producing outstanding scientists and engineers who will broadly advance science and the missions important to participating agencies, such as DOE.

The award also recognizes scientists and engineers who show exceptional potential for leadership in scholarship, service and education.

With more than 100 publications and several long-term international research collaborations, Zhang is recognized for her contributions in ion-solid interactions, irradiation effects and ion beam techniques. She also is active in several professional societies, has received many international scientific and academic awards and is involved in educational activities and community service.

She routinely hosts visiting scientists at EMSL's ion-beam user facility, lectures on topics related to ion beam physics, mentors post doctoral fellows, graduate students, summer undergraduates and high school interns, serves on Ph.D. committees, assists local middle schools with Chinese translations, and serves as a judge for local science fairs.

Zhang holds two doctorate degrees - one in engineering physics from Lund University in Sweden and another in science from Beijing Normal University in China.  (Posted 7/27/2006)

hydrogen

PNNL's Marylynn Placet Shares DOE Hydrogen Program Award for Excellence in R&D

(Argonne National Laboratory, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and others). Marianne Mintz and Michael Wang of Argonne National Laboratory; Margaret Mann, Johanna Levene, and Matthew Ringer of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Marylynn Placet of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Mike Rutkowski of Parsons Engineering; Steven Lasher and Kurt Roth of TIAX; Brian James of Directed Technologies, Inc.; Dan Mears of Technology Insights; and Joan Ogden of the University of California, Davis, received the 2005 Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program Award for Excellence in R&D in May. The team of scientists and engineers was recognized for advancing the analysis capabilities of hydrogen production and distribution. Their efforts resulted in an H2A model that provides a clear and transparent methodology, enabling DOE to evaluate various technology options for producing and delivering hydrogen and make decisions in an unbiased manner.

The award was presented at the 2005 Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation of the U.S. DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program. The peer-review meeting was held on May 23 - 25, 2005, in Arlington, Virginia. PNNL's role was to assist in the development of the lifecycle costing methodology and develop appropriate financial and feedstock price forecasts for use in the analysis.  (Posted 10/1/2005)

bpa

PNNL Power Grid Expert Receives BPA Award

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researcher and Laboratory Fellow John Hauer received one of the Bonneville Power Administration's highest honors, the BPA Award for Exceptional Public Service.

Hauer is an internationally recognized expert in power system monitoring, analysis and control. After retiring from BPA in 1994, Hauer joined PNNL and continued his pioneering work in improving power system reliability. Although semi-retired from PNNL, Hauer still is active on BPA and Department of Energy projects.

For example, Hauer has been instrumental in the creation and implementation of technologies to reduce blackouts, such as the one experienced by the eastern United States and Canada in August 2003.

The award is part of BPA's 2005 Administrator's Excellence Awards program. It recognizes "outstanding achievements by employees whose innovation, initiative, superior service or courageous acts have made exceptional contributions to BPA's mission, the electric utility industry or to the local community." The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a federal agency under the U.S. Department of Energy.

Hauer is a 1961 electrical engineering graduate of Gonzaga University and received a Ph.D. in controls systems from the University of Washington in 1968. He is a licensed professional engineer and a life fellow of the Institute for Electrical and Electronic Engineers.  (Posted 8/22/2005)

moss

DOE's Distinguished Associate Award Presented to PNNL Researcher

Richard Moss recognized by Secretary of Energy for leadership in global and climate change research.

Richard Moss, director of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program Office in Washington D.C., and a staff scientist of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has received the Distinguished Associate Award from the Department of Energy. The award, designated and signed by Spencer Abraham, former Secretary of Energy, recognizes Moss "for his outstanding leadership and individual efforts in global and climate change research and his dedication in helping to integrate ... agency research and develop the Strategic Plan for these combined programs." The award was presented at a ceremony in January by Dr. Raymond Orbach, director of DOE's Office of Science.

The U.S. Climate Change Science Program is the nation's foremost national research program focusing on changes in climate and related environmental systems. The program integrates research from 13 participating federal agencies and departments, and has an annual budget of approximately $1.8 billion.

The Distinguished Associate Award is the highest award for employees of DOE-owned, contractor-operated facilities, such as PNNL. Winners must be nominated by DOE program managers and cannot apply for the honor.

In addition to his role of director of the program office, Moss also holds an appointment as staff scientist at the Joint Global Change Research Institute which is managed by the University of Maryland - College Park and PNNL. From 1993-1998, he served as director of the Technical Support Unit of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change - impacts, adaptation and mitigation working group. He has served as a lead author and general editor of several IPCC assessments, special reports and technical papers.

Moss has also served as program officer at the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme in Stockholm, Sweden, where he co-authored a report on human drivers of land use and land cover change. Moss served on the faculty of Princeton University from 1989 to 1991. He currently chairs the Task Group on Data and Scenario Support for Impact and Climate Analysis of the IPCC and serves on the editorial board of Climatic Change Magazine. He was named a fellow of the Aldo Leopold Leadership Program in 2001 and was a member of the editorial board of Annual Review of Energy and the Environment from 1994-1999.

He earned a bachelor's degree in English literature from Carleton College in Minnesota in 1977, and master's and doctorate degrees in public and international affairs from Princeton University in 1983 and 1987, respectively.

PNNL (www.pnl.gov) is a DOE Office of Science laboratory that solves complex problems in energy, national security, the environment and life sciences by advancing the understanding of physics, chemistry, biology and computation. PNNL employs 3,900, has a $650 million annual budget, and has been managed by Ohio-based Battelle since the lab's inception in 1965.  (Posted 1/31/2005)

PNNL Team Receives Two ChemLuminary Awards for Volunteer Efforts

Timothy Hubler
Timothy Hubler
Janet Bryant
Janet Bryant
Sam Bryan
Sam Bryan

Tim Hubler, Sam Bryan and Janet Bryant, all of Environmental Technology Directorate, received two ChemLuminary awards for their volunteer efforts through the Richland Section of the American Chemical Society to "open young minds to science." They were part of a team that organized the Native American Umatilla Reservation Math/Science Fair, Girls in Science Day, Project SEED, and Careers in Chemistry for middle school minority students.

 (Posted 10/20/2005)

Three PNNL Researchers Win Industrial Innovation Awards

Alison Campbell
Allison Campbell
Mary Bliss
Mary Bliss
Ned Wogman
Ned Wogman

Dr. Allison Campbell, Dr. Mary Bliss and Dr. Ned Wogman received Regional Industrial Innovation Awards from the American Chemical Society (ACS).

Campbell received the award for the development of a bioceramic coating for implants that will mimic bone growth and extend artificial implant life.

The team of Bliss and Wogman was honored for their collaboration on the development of a glass fiber neutron detector, a revolutionary radiation monitoring system that uses glass fibers to detect the presence of radionuclides such as plutonium.

Campbell is the director of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory at PNNL. Bliss is responsible for managing the only glass fiber drawing facility in the DOE complex. Wogman is the director of PNNL's Homeland Security Program.  (Posted 8/25/2005)

somasundaram

Sriram Somasundaram Receives ASME Dedicated Service Award

Sriram Somasundaram, Energy Science and Technology Directorate, received the American Society of Mechanical Engineers' Dedicated Service Award in 2004. This award honors outstanding leadership, dedicated service and enthusiasm for advancing the art and science of mechanical engineering. He served as chair of the Advanced Energy Systems Division from 2003-2004, and now is on the Society-wide committees of the Business Development for Conferences and Events, Volunteer Orientation and Leadership Training Academy, the Board on Institutes and the ad-hoc committee to explore the formation of an Energy and Power Institute within ASME. He also is an associate editor of the Journal of Energy Resources Technology.  (Posted 5/19/2005)

yuehe

Yuehe Lin and C0-Authors Receive Award for Highly Cited Electrochemistry Article

Congratulations to ETD's Yuehe Lin and his co-authors for receiving the 2005 award for the best cited paper published in Electrochemistry Communications. Yuehe's article "Low-potential stable NADH detection at carbon-nanotube-modified glassy carbon electrodes," published in 2002, has been cited extensively.

The paper elucidates the researchers' discovery that electrodes based on carbon-nanotubes have significantly enhanced sensitivity and stability for detecting nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, a molecule that participates in many important biological reactions. This discovery forms the basis for the development of biosensors based on carbon nanotubes. Electrochemistry Communications is ranked second in citation impact in the field of electrochemistry.  (Posted 12/1/2005)

wmartin

Wayne Martin Named One of Top Minorities in Research Science

Wayne Martin received Science Spectrum's Trailblazer 2005 Top Minorities in Research Science award. This award honors recipients who are distinguished thinkers and doers making a difference in their respective fields. They desire to lead, develop ideas, and change the ways we live and see the world today and in the future.

For more than 25 years, Wayne has conducted, directed, and led research in subsurface contaminant migration and waste storage. He is also a supporter of educational activities including the National Urban League's Black Executive Exchange, the WSU Tri-Cities Advisory Council, and the Black Engineer of the Year Awards Conference.  (Posted 11/28/2005)

ywang

Yong Wang Joins Editorial Board of Catalysis Today

Yong Wang has been invited to join the editorial board of Catalysis Today, a serial publication dealing with topical themes in catalysis. As a board member, Yong will help improve the quality of the journal by attending editorial board meetings, promoting the journal, and actively encouraging colleagues and peers to submit high-quality papers.

Yong was selected for this honor because of his contributions in the field of heterogeneous catalysis and microchannel reaction technology to the development of energy efficient technologies. He has also received two R&D 100 awards, a Presidential Green Chemistry Award, and holds 57 issued patents.  (Posted 11/1/2005)

young

Jonathan Young Appointed Member of National Research Council Committee

Jonathan Young has been appointed to the Committee on Determining Basic Research Needs to Interrupt the Improvised Explosive Device Delivery Chain. The committee is a multidisciplinary group who advises the Office of Naval Research on ascertaining basic research questions in physical science, social science, and engineering that, if answered, could lead to new methods of countering use of improvised explosive devices.

Jonathan will contribute to the deliberations and reporting of the committee. He will also serve on a subcommittee that plans the detailed committee activities. Jonathan was selected because of his expertise in probabilistic risk assessment, systems engineering, and uncertainty analysis.  (Posted 11/1/2005)

thom

Ron Thom Meets with National Research Council to Protect Eroding Shorelines

Ron Thom, working at PNNL's Sequim Marine Research Operations, met with the National Research Council panel, organized by the National Academy of Science, to discuss shore erosion along sheltered coasts. The panel examined the efficiency and environmental effects of erosion mitigation techniques in a two-day workshop. Ron discussed protecting beach shorelines and ways to use vegetation to protect shorelines.

NRC Program Assistant Sarah Capote stated, "We selected Ron as a panel member because of his expertise in mitigating shoreline erosion." For nearly three decades, Ron has studied and resolved complex marine and coastal issues, specializing in nearshore habitat ecology and restoration.  (Posted 10/1/2005)

devanathan

PNNL's Ram Devanathan Selected to Participate in National Academy of Engineering 11th Annual Frontiers of Engineering Symposium

The three-day event will bring together engineers ages 30 to 45 who are performing cutting-edge engineering research and technical work. The participants — from industry, academia, and government — were nominated by fellow engineers or organizations. The symposium will be held Sept. 22 – 24, 2005, at GE Global Research Center in Niskayuna, N.Y., and will explore aspects of ID and verification technologies, the engineering of complex systems, engineering for developing communities, and energy. Devanathan was one of only 88 engineers nationwide selected to attend the symposium.  (Posted 8/17/2005)

peters

Dr. Leonard K. Peters, Director of PNNL, Selected to Receive Oak Ridge Associated Universities Outstanding Leadership Award

The award was established to recognize individuals who have demonstrated sustained leadership and support of ORAU activities involving member universities and/or national laboratories. The award also includes a grant to support a conference or symposium, which will be used to hold a conference on atmospheric chemistry.

Peters came to PNNL in 2003 with a distinguished career in research, most recently serving as the Vice Provost for Research at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University where he managed Virginia Tech's diverse $230 million research program.

Peters was recognized for this honor at the 59th Annual Meeting of the Council of Sponsoring Institutions, which was held on March 9th in Washington, D.C.  (Posted 3/9/2005)

 

2005 Fellowships

bruemmer

Steve Bruemmer Elected Fellow in National Association of Corrosion Engineers

Steve Bruemmer has been elected as Fellow in the National Association of Corrosion Engineers (NACE). The award was presented at the Corrosion 2006 Conference on March 12-16 in San Diego.

Steve earned his B.S. and M.S. in Metallurgical Engineering from the University of Illinois and a Ph.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from the Oregon Graduate Institute for Science and Technology. He joined Battelle in 1978 and became a Laboratory Fellow in 1995. He is author or co-author of more than 270 technical publications; author for several book chapters; editor of five books, and has given more than 60 invited lectures at conferences and meetings. In addition to being elected Fellow in the National Association of Corrosion Engineers and elected in 2006, he is a Fellow in ASM International and a member of the Materials Research Society and the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (Past Chairman of the Corrosion and Environmental Effects Committee and Secretary/Treasurer for the Structural Materials Division), and he received Distinguished Service Award in 2002.

While at PNNL, Steve has initiated and led a wide range of basic and applied research programs in materials science as program manager and principal investigator. His research encompasses simple and advanced materials, physical and mechanical properties, and environmental effects on material behavior. The emphasis of his work is on the measurement, understanding, and prediction of microstructural and microchemical effects on the structural reliability of engineering materials. He is an acknowledged leader in the quantification of grain boundary segregation, precipitation, and deformation effects on materials failure.  (Posted 11/1/2005)

xantheus

Sotiris Xantheas Named American Physical Society Fellow

Sotiris Xantheas has been appointed Fellow of the American Physical Society. Sotiris was nominated for this honor by the Division of Chemical Physics for his fundamental contributions to the understanding of molecular interactions in aqueous systems.

Sotiris is known in the chemical physics community for his research on intermolecular interactions in aqueous ionic clusters and the use of ab-initio electronic structure calculations to elucidate their structural and spectral features and the development of interaction potentials for water. He has received a Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel award and PNNL's Director's award for Outstanding Performance in 2003. Sotiris has written or contributed to more than 75 publications and has received more than 3,500 citations.  (Posted 11/1/2005)

Five PNNL Researchers Elected Fellows by AAAS

Five scientists from the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been elected Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Linda Lasure and Steven Wiley were elected Fellows in the AAAS section on biological sciences. Greg Exarhos and Bruce Kay were elected Fellows in the AAAS section on chemistry. Subhash Singhal was elected a Fellow in the AAAS section on engineering. All five will be recognized at the Fellows Forum at the AAAS national meeting in St. Louis in February.

Election as an AAAS Fellow is determined by peer reviewers. Fellows are honored for "meritorious efforts to advance science or its applications." AAAS began honoring its distinguished members with the title of Fellow in 1874.

Greg Exarhos
Greg Exarhos

Greg Exarhos is a Laboratory Fellow in PNNL's Fundamental Science Directorate. He is being recognized for "innovative research on charge transport processes in dielectric films and the use of light scattering methods to probe structure/property relationships."

Prior to joining PNNL in 1980, Exarhos was an assistant professor at Harvard University. He is currently the associate director for interfacial chemistry and engineering in PNNL's Chemical Sciences Division and is the Program Coordinator for the suite of BES Materials Sciences projects within the laboratory.

Exarhos earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry with a minor in physics from Lawrence University in 1970, and a doctorate in physical chemistry from Brown University in 1974.

Linda lasure
Linda Lasure

Linda Lasure manages a team in PNNL's chemical, biological and processing group in the laboratory's Environmental Technology research directorate. She is being honored for her "sustained and effective leadership in industrial microbiology, particularly the innovative use of fungal enzymes in product development."

Before joining PNNL in 2001, Lasure was the president of Lasure and Associates, Vice President of Panlabs, Inc, and had previously served as the president of CellPath, Inc.

Lasure earned a bachelor's degree in biology and chemistry from St. Cloud State College in 1968 and a doctorate in Genetics from Syracuse University in 1973.

Bruce Kay
Bruce Kay

Bruce Kay is Laboratory Fellow in PNNL's Fundamental Science Directorate. He was elected for his "innovative use of molecular beams to elucidate chemical kinetics and dynamics at environmentally-relevant aqueous and oxide interfaces."

He has been with PNNL since 1991 and is also an affiliate professor of chemical engineering and of physical chemistry at the University of Washington.

Kay earned a bachelor's degree in chemistry in 1976 from the University of Illinois; and a doctorate in chemical physics in 1982 from the University of Colorado.

Subhash Singhal
Subhash Singhal

Subhash Singhal is a Battelle Fellow in PNNL's Energy Science and Technology Directorate. He is being recognized for "outstanding leadership in developing and promoting solid oxide fuel cells for clean and efficient power generation." Singhal joined PNNL in 2000 and is the director of fuel cells for the laboratory.

Singhal earned a bachelor's degree in physics, chemistry and mathematics from Agra University in India in 1963; a bachelor's degree in metallurgy from the Indian Institute of Science in Bangalore, India in 1965; a doctorate in materials science and engineering from the University of Pennsylvania in 1969; and a master's degree in business administration from the University of Pittsburgh in 1977. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering.

Steve Wiley
Steven Wiley

Steven Wiley is a Laboratory Fellow in PNNL's Fundamental Science Directorate. He was elected a Fellow for his "significant contributions in the newly emerging area of systems biology and important achievements in the quantitative analysis of the EGF receptor system."

Wiley has been with PNNL since 2000 and serves as the director of the laboratory's Biolmolecular Systems Initiative and the PNNL Program Office for Systems Biology and Biotechnology.

He earned a bachelor's degree in biology from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville in 1974 and a doctorate in biomedical sciences from the University of Tennessee - Oak Ridge Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences in 1979.

The honorees join 10 current PNNL staff members previously elected as AAAS Fellows.

Founded in 1848, AAAS (www.aaas.org) has worked to advance science for human well-being through its projects, programs and publications in the areas of science policy, science education and international scientific cooperation. Science magazine is the chief publication of the AAAS, reviewing and publishing many of the top research papers in the biological and physical sciences. Science was established by Thomas Edison in 1880, and has the highest paid circulation of any scientific journal in the world.  (Posted 10/20/2005)

april

John April Named Fellow in American Society of Civil Engineers

John April of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has advanced to the grade of Fellow in the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). This is the highest technical grade in ASCE that is attained by less than 5 percent of the society's members. The ASCE is the oldest national engineering society in the world, with more than 133,000 members. John has been a member for over ten years. He has over twenty seven years of experience in geotechnical engineering, supporting naval nuclear programs, Indian water rights and project management of large scale environmental restoration projects for private and federal agencies. He rejoined PNNL in August of this year after an eleven year absence and is working on the Radiation Portal Monitor Project as an equipment design authority. For those eleven years John was working for the Hanford Environmental Restoration Project with several management and engineering assignments from proto-type, design, regulatory documentation and his recent achievement of performing dual role of construction management and resident engineer for the Environmental Restoration Facility Expansion Cells 5 & 6.  (Posted 10/19/2005)

cesar

César Izaurralde Elected Fellow of American Society of Agronomy

César Izaurralde is a Laboratory Fellow in the Joint Global Change Research Institute, a collaboration of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Maryland. He is also an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Geography and an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Natural Resource Sciences and Landscape Architecture at the University of Maryland. Dr. Izaurralde earned his Agronomist Engineer degree from University of Córdoba (Argentina) and his M.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees from Kansas State University.

Dr. Izaurralde's research focuses in three areas: 1) sustainable agriculture, 2) climate change impacts on agriculture and water resources and 3) climate change mitigation through soil carbon sequestration and reductions in soil emissions of nitrous oxide. He uses modeling and experimental approaches to understand the mechanisms of carbon stabilization in soil and explain production and evolution of nitrous oxide in soil. Dr. Izaurralde's research contributes to a larger program of integrated assessment of global change conducted at the Joint Global Change Research Institute.

Dr. Izaurralde has authored or co-authored 64 refereed journal articles, 26 book chapters, 56 abstracts, 5 computer programs, and 18 extension publications.

Dr. Izaurralde has been an active member of the American Society of Agronomy and the Soil Science Society of America since 1982. He is also an active member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Geophysical Union, and the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing. He currently serves as invited Associate Editor of the Journal of Environmental Quality.  (Posted 10/1/2005)

koppenaal

PNNL Scientist Appointed to Royal Chemistry Society

Dave Koppenaal, a Laboratory Fellow and manager of Macromolecular Structure and Dynamics at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been appointed a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, UK. The honor is given to distinguished scientists who have made outstanding contributions to the advancement of chemical science.

Koppenaal was selected for his more than 30 years of experience and achievement in the field of chemistry, and for his internationally recognized expertise in plasma source mass spectrometry. He has been involved in ion source, instrumentation, application and theoretical innovations with this widely-used and applied analytical technology. He has pioneered the application of ion molecule reactions in inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry, and also initiated its use as a powerful and increasingly relevant radioanalytical tool. Currently, he is leading a collaboration effort on the design of a new detector technology for mass spectrometry and is active in the development of techniques and methods for use in proteomics and structural and functional biology research. Koppenaal has interacted extensively with UK colleagues and instrumentation manufacturers in many of these endeavors.

Koppenaal earned a bachelor’s degree in environmental chemistry and mathematics from Southwest Missouri State University in Springfield in 1974 and a doctorate in chemistry from the University of Missouri in Columbia in 1978. He has published more than 68 scientific articles, has seven patents and has presented more than 130 lectures internationally. In 1998, Koppenaal was appointed a Laboratory Fellow, the highest distinction of scientific achievement at PNNL. He also is a member of the American Chemical Society, American Society for Mass Spectrometry and Society of Applied Spectroscopy.

RSC (www.rsc.org) has 42,000 members, and was founded in England in 1877. The RSC is the largest organization in Europe for chemical sciences and works to pursue the advancement of chemistry, the dissemination of chemical knowledge and the development of chemical applications.

PNNL (www.pnl.gov) is a DOE Office of Science laboratory that solves complex problems in energy, national security, the environment and life sciences by advancing the understanding of physics, chemistry, biology and computation. PNNL employs more than 4,000, has a $650 million annual budget, and has been managed by Ohio-based Battelle since the laboratory’s inception in 1965.  (Posted 5/16/2005)

 

2005 Elected Positions and Offices

ywang3

Yong Wang to Chair Program Committee for ACS Petroleum Chemistry Division

Congratulations to ETD's Yong Wang on his appointment as Program Committee Chair of the American Chemical Society's Division of Petroleum Chemistry from 2006 to 2008. The Division of Petroleum Chemistry is a professional network of scientists and engineers interested in the chemistry of petroleum exploration, refining, and effective networking opportunities.

Yong's responsibilities will include identifying topics for future Division symposia for National ACS meetings, pursuing Division participation, and establishing working relationships with other Division Program Chairs. Yong was selected for this honor because of his contributions in the field of heterogeneous catalysis to the development of energy efficient technologies.  (Posted 12/1/2005)

astm

Gary L. Smith Re-Elected to ASTM International Committee C26 on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

Gary L. Smith has been re-elected to Chair the ASTM International Committee C26 on the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. This committee develops consensus standards that facilitate many aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle, including spent nuclear fuel, waste materials, and repository waste packaging and storage. As C26 Chair, Gary presides over all committee meetings, works with the executive committee to appoint and approve subcommittee chairs, and serves as ex officio member of 13 subcommittees.

Gary is a Fellow of ASTM International and has spent much of his career conducting research on nuclear waste and waste vitrification. Currently, he is on full-time loan to the Hanford Waste Vitrification Project Research & Technology Organization.  (Posted 9/1/2005)

ray

Doug Ray Joins National Academy Chemical Sciences Roundtable

Doug Ray has been appointed to the National Academies' Chemical Sciences Roundtable. The CSR is a unique science-oriented, apolitical forum for leaders of the chemical enterprise. Its objectives are to facilitate enhanced understanding of issues in the chemical sciences and technologies that affect government, industry, academic, national laboratories, and nonprofit sectors, and the interactions among them.

As a member, Doug will attend several annual meetings and organize workshops on highly relevant and important topics. The proceedings of the workshops are made available to the chemical sciences community and are designed to enable follow-up discussion or action by others in the chemical sciences community.  (Posted 12/1/2005)

dupuis

Michel Dupuis Elected to International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science

Dr. Michel Dupuis, a Laboratory Fellow in the Molecular Interactions and Transformations Group, was elected to the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science at its 42nd annual meeting held July 2-3, 2005, at Menton, France.

The Academy was created in Menton, in 1967. Originally, the Academy was limited to 25 regular members under the age of 65, with no limit on senior members. The Academy has expanded to 35 regular members under the age of 65 and currently includes 88 members worldwide. The members are selected from scientists from all countries who have distinguished themselves in the broad field of the application of quantum mechanics to the study of molecules and macromolecules. The main goal of the Academy is to provide a forum for international contact and collaboration and a periodical evaluation of the main developments, advances, and promising directions of research in the broad field of its interest. (Adapted from the Academy’s web site.)  (Posted 7/7/2005)

singhal

Fuel Cell Pioneer, Subhash Singha, Elected to National Academy of Engineering

Subhash C. Singhal, Battelle Fellow and director of fuel cells research at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, was one of 74 members elected today to the National Academy of Engineering, the NAE announced in Washington, D.C.

Singhal is PNNL’s only current staff member in the National Academy, which includes NAE, the National Academy of Sciences, the Institute of Medicine and the National Research Council.

Singhal was cited by NAE "for the development and promotion of solid oxide fuel cells for clean and efficient power generation." He is noted for developing high-temperature solid oxide fuel cells, having brought this technology from experimental units that generated only a few watts to fully integrated, 200 kilowatt power-generation systems.

"Subhash is recognized internationally as a leader in solid oxide fuel cell technology," said PNNL Director Len Peters. "This is a wonderful recognition by his peers and members of our nation’s most prestigious scientific and engineering body. Not only are we thrilled for Subhash, but we also take this as a reflection of the world class, high-impact science we do at PNNL."

Singhal leads the technical, managerial and commercialization efforts for PNNL’s extensive fuel cell program. He joined the lab’s Energy Science and Technology Directorate in 2000 after 29 years with Siemens Westinghouse Power Corp. He has conducted and managed major research, development and demonstration programs in advanced materials and energy conversion systems, particularly high temperature fuel cells.

He is author of more than 70 scientific publications and has edited 12 books, received 13 patents and given more than 205 invited presentations worldwide. He is a fellow of the American Ceramic Society, of the Electrochemical Society and of ASM International (formerly known as the American Society for Metals); and a member of the Mineral, Metals & Materials Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He serves on numerous national and international advisory committees. He holds a doctorate in materials science and engineering from the University of Pennsylvania and a master’s in business administration from the University of Pittsburgh.

NAE (www.nae.edu) membership is among the highest professional distinctions accorded an engineer, the NAE said in its announcement. Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to "engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature" and to the "pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to engineering education."

Today’s elections bring the total U.S. membership to 2,195. Singhal and the other new members will be inducted at a ceremony at the NAE annual meeting on Oct. 9 at its headquarters in Washington, D.C.

PNNL (www.pnl.gov) is a DOE Office of Science laboratory that solves complex problems in energy, national security, the environment and life sciences by advancing the understanding of physics, chemistry, biology and computation. PNNL employs 3,900, has a $650 million annual budget, and has been managed by Ohio-based Battelle since the lab’s inception in 1965.

For more on PNNL’s fuel cells work, see http://www.pnl.gov/energy/fuelcells/index.stm.  (Posted 2/16/2005)

 

2004 Awards

PNNL's Diaz Receives National Engineering and Homeland Security Honors

Diaz recognized twice with distinct honors for leadership in developing homeland security technology.

Aaron Diaz, a staff scientist at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been selected to receive two distinct honors for his work in homeland security.

Aaron Diaz

The first is the Outstanding Technical Achievement Award from the Hispanic Engineer National Achievement Awards Corporation (HENAAC). Diaz is the first PNNL staff member to receive this honor, and joins other 2004 winners from IBM, Hewlett Packard and Argonne National Laboratory. Diaz is being recognized for both his technical accomplishments as well as his extensive contributions of community service in the greater Hispanic community.

The second is the Christopher Columbus Fellowship Foundation's (CCFF) Homeland Security Award. Diaz is being recognized in the field of border/transportation security for his scientific research and engineering development of nondestructive and noninvasive ultrasonic technologies.

At PNNL, Diaz led the development of ultrasonic measurement techniques that have resulted in the invention of the Acoustic Inspection Device, a technology being commercialized for use by border patrol agents around the United States. This technology also won an R&D 100 Award and a Federal Laboratory Consortium Award for Technology Transfer in 2003.

Diaz has been an invited speaker at numerous scientific conferences, and has continued that speaking role for minority student audiences ranging from elementary to post-graduate level. He has been active in the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, the International Society for Optical Engineering and the American Society for Nondestructive Testing. Additionally, he continues to make regular visits to his hometown of Toppenish, Wash., where he encourages high school students to pursue studies in science.

Diaz 
demonstrates the Acoustic Inspection Device, a technology that provides a noninvasive evaluation of 
sealed containers
Diaz demonstrates the Acoustic Inspection Device, a technology that provides a noninvasive evaluation of sealed containers (7"x5" 300 dpi image available from PNNL's Photo Library)

He earned a bachelor's degree in physics from the University of California at Santa Cruz in 1989, and has more than 30 publications and technical reports to his credit.

Diaz will receive the HENAAC award during the 16th Annual HENAAC Conference on Oct. 8, in Pasadena, Calif., at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium, a venue that also has hosted the Emmys and the Oscars. He will receive the CCFF Homeland Security Award on Oct. 11 — Columbus Day — at a ceremony held at the Phoenix Park Hotel in Washington, D.C.

HENAAC (www.henaac.org) was established in 1989 to highlight the achievements of Hispanics in engineering, science, technology, and math; to motivate and educate more students to pursue careers in these fields; and to increase the role the Hispanic community plays in maintaining America's status as the world's technology leader. Contributing partners to the HENAAC mission include universities, NASA and the National Academy of Engineering.

CCFF (www.columbusfdn.org) was established by Congress in 1992 as an independent federal agency to "encourage and support research, study and labor designed to produce new discoveries in all fields of endeavor for the benefit of mankind." Governed by a Presidential appointed Board of Trustees, the Foundation seeks to nurture and recognize pioneering individuals and programs which reflect the visionary spirit and pioneering heritage of Christopher Columbus through competitions.  (Posted 9/28/2004)

PNNL Scientist Selected for National Academy Symposium

Yong Wang chosen as one of only 86 in the nation to participate in pioneering engineering event.

Yong Wang, a senior scientist at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been invited to participate in the National Academy of Engineering’s 10th annual Frontiers of Engineering symposium, September 9-11, in Irvine, Calif.

Yong WangThe three-day event will bring together engineers ages 30 to 45 who are performing cutting-edge engineering research and technical work in industry, academia and government. Wang was selected for his work in the development of advanced catalysts and novel reactors for hydrogen production, the development of microchannel reactors and engineered catalyst for microchannel fuel processing, and chemical synthesis and aqueous phase catalysis for biomass conversion.

Wang has more than 20 years of experience in the fields of catalysis and reaction engineering. He has received two R&D 100 Awards, a Presidential Green Chemistry Award, was named the 2004 PNNL Inventor of the Year and the 2003 Battelle Distinguished Inventor. Wang has 88 publications and 30 issued U.S. patents, 15 of which were granted in 2003 and eight already in 2004. Additionally, Wang has co-authored a textbook titled Microreaction Technology and Process Intensification to be published in 2005.

Wang earned a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Chengdu University of Science and Technology in China in 1984, and master’s and doctorate degrees in chemical engineering from Washington State University in 1992 and 1993, respectively.

Wang is the third staff member from PNNL to be selected for this honor, and the second in the last two years. S.K. Sundaram was selected in 2001, and Cindy Bruckner-Lea in 2003. He currently focuses on the development of microchannel reactors for fuel processing and chemical synthesis. He also is an adjunct professor at Washington State University.

The National Academy of Engineering (www.nae.edu) was established in 1964 as an independent, nonprofit institution that serves as an adviser to government and the public on issues in engineering and technology. Its members consist of the nation’s premier engineers, who are elected by their peers for their distinguished achievements.

PNNL (www.pnl.gov) is a DOE Office of Science research center that advances the fundamental understanding of complex systems and provides science-based solutions in national security, energy, chemistry, the biological sciences and environmental quality. Battelle, based in Columbus, Ohio, has operated PNNL for DOE since 1965.  (Posted 9/4/2004)

PNNL Research Team Wins Industrial Innovation Award

Novella Bridges, Darrell Fisher and Anna Gutowska, research scientists at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, recently received the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) 2004 Regional Industrial Innovation Award. The award is given to individuals and teams whose creative innovations have contributed to the commercial success of their company and to the good of society.

The team is being honored for their collaborative work on development of radiolabeled composites, known as RadioGel™, as therapeutic agents for high dose treatment of solid cancers that cannot be removed surgically. RadioGel™ is an injectable solution that holds the therapeutic radioisotope in place at the target site for highly-localized radiation therapy of cancerous tissue with minimal effects on adjacent healthy tissues and normal organs. It has applications for treating cancers of the liver, pancreas, brain, neck and kidneys.

Bridges, Fisher and Gutowska were presented with the award in June at the ACS 59th Northwest/18th Rocky Mountain Regional Industrial Innovation Award Program in Logan, Utah.

Bridges specializes in inorganic chemistry. She earned a bachelor degree in chemistry from Jackson State University in 1994 and a doctorate degree in inorganic chemistry and organometallics from Louisiana State University in 2000.

Fisher has more than 30 years of experience in radioisotope science, and has more than 90 publications and four patents. He earned a bachelor degree in biology from the University of Utah in 1975, and masters and doctorate degrees in nuclear engineering sciences from the University of Florida in 1976 and 1978, respectively.

Gutowska has served as a leader in the field of polymer development. Her extensive research experience is focused on stimuli-sensitive polymer research with a major focus on medical applications. She holds four patents, with several pending, and has more than 24 publications. Gutowska earned a masters degree in chemistry from the University of Warsaw, Warsaw, Poland in 1978; and a doctorate in pharmaceutics and pharmaceutical chemistry at the University of Utah in 1994.

ACS was founded in 1876, and consists of more than 159,000 members at all degree levels in all fields of chemistry. ACS is actively involved in the science, education and public policy arenas.

PNNL (www.pnl.gov) is a DOE Office of Science research center that advances the fundamental understanding of complex systems and provides science-based solutions in national security, energy, chemistry, the biological sciences and environmental quality. Battelle, based in Columbus, Ohio, has operated PNNL for DOE since 1965.  (Posted 6/25/2004)

Alan Waltar Receives American Nuclear Society 2004 Public Communication Award

Alan Waltar, director of Nuclear Energy at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been named the recipient of the American Nuclear Society's 2004 Public Communication Award. According to ANS, he is being recognized for his exceptional achievements in furthering public understanding of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, and will receive the award at the ANS annual meeting, June 15, in Pittsburgh, Penn.

Waltar has more than 30 years experience in the fields of nuclear energy and nuclear communications. He has published more than 70 scientific articles, written two books and has presented lectures throughout the United States and 15 foreign countries. He served as president of ANS in 1994-1995 and was elected a Fellow of the society in 1984.

His latest book, "Radiation and Modern Life: Fulfilling Marie Curie's Dream", will be published in November, 2004.

Additionally, Waltar helped found the Eagle Alliance in 1996, a national educational movement designed to encourage policymakers to endorse nuclear technologies and to support demonstration of its societal benefits.

He earned a bachelors of science degree in electrical engineering from the University of Washington, a masters of science degree in nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a doctorate degree in engineering science from the University of California at Berkley. Prior to joining PNNL in 2002, Waltar served as professor and head of nuclear engineer at Texas A&M University, overseeing what is now the largest department of nuclear engineering in the nation.

The ANS Public Communication Award was established in 1983 to recognize and honor individuals for outstanding personal dedication and accomplishment in furthering public understanding of the peaceful applications of nuclear technology. ANS (www.ans.org) was established in 1954 and includes more than 10,000 members.  (Posted 6/15/2004)

rosso

Kevin Rosso Awarded Mineralogical Society of America Award for 2004

The Mineralogical Society of America (MSA) has awarded Kevin Rosso, senior research scientist, their Mineralogical Society of America Award for 2004. The MSA Award is one of the most prestigious awards in the entire field of geosciences and is awarded in recognition of outstanding published contributions to the science of mineralogy by individuals near the beginning of their professional careers.

Rosso is well recognized for his work to creatively address long-standing problems in mineral surface chemistry related to reactivity and electron exchange at the mineral-water interface. He earned a doctorate in geological sciences from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1998 and joined PNNL as a full-time research scientist that same year.

The recipient of the MSA Award receives a certificate and is made a Life Fellow of the Society. More information on the award is available at www.minsocam.org/MSA/Awards/MSA_Award.html.  (Posted 12/16/2003)

chambers

Scott Chambers Selected as 2004 Recipient of E.W. Mueller Award for Outstanding Research in Surface Science

He is being recognized for advancing the science of molecular beam epitaxy, and applying it to fundamental investigations of the structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of metal oxide films, surfaces, and interfaces.

Chambers, a Laboratory Fellow at PNNL, has 25 years of experience in the fields of surface science and electronic materials. He hold three patents, has more than 150 publications, and is a Fellow of the American Vacuum Society.

Chambers will be recognized for this honor at a reception at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, in August where he will be presented a certificate of achievement and a prize of $5,000. Additionally, he will be given a series of lectures on his work to a select audience of students, faculty, university administrators, and industry representatives.  (Posted 8/1/2004)

 

2004 Fellowships

henderson

PNNL Scientist Named AVS Fellow

Michael Henderson, a scientist at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been named a Fellow of the American Vacuum Society (AVS). Henderson was selected for his scientific and technical contributions in pioneering investigations of fundamental phenomena on oxide surfaces. Fellow status is the highest recognition an AVS member can receive. Henderson will be recognized at the AVS Award Assembly on November 17, in Anaheim, California.

Henderson has more than 20 years of experience in the field of chemistry. His current research focus is in molecular-level examination of the chemistry of oxide single crystals in vacuum conditions. He further works to provide fundamental understanding into the physical and chemical properties of complex oxide surface phenomena. He has 90 publications and is a highly regarded professional speaker in his field, with 59 presentations to his credit.

He earned a bachelor's and master's degree in chemistry from Auburn University in Alabama in 1981 and 1984, respectively. He earned a doctorate in physical chemistry from the University of Texas-Austin in 1988. Henderson also served as board member for the Pacific Northwest chapter.

AVS (www.avs.org) was founded in 1953 to promote communication between academia, government laboratories and industry for the purpose of dissemination of information in science and technology. AVS is comprised of more than 6,000 members worldwide.  (Posted 11/17/2004)

neitzel

PNNL Scientist Appointed American Institute of Fishery Research Biologists Fellow

Duane Neitzel, a scientist at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been awarded the status of Fellow in the American Institute of Fishery Research Biologists (AIFRB). It’s the highest honor the Institute bestows upon a member. Neitzel was selected for this recognition based on his extensive research into hatchery and fisheries projects on the Columbia River and throughout the Columbia Basin.

Neitzel has more than 30 years of experience in the fields of biology and aquatic ecosystems. His research currently is focused on the assessment of impacts to aquatic ecosystems from the development and production of energy, and the management of hazardous wastes. Neitzel’s work has appeared in more than 100 journal articles, symposium proceedings and technical reports.

He earned a bachelor’s degree in zoology from the University of Washington in 1968 and a master’s degree in biology from Washington State University in 1982. Neitzel holds professional certification as a fisheries biologist from the American Fisheries Society and as an ecologist from the Ecological Society of America.

AIFRB (www.aifrb.org) was founded in 1956 to promote conservation and proper utilization of fishery resources through the application of fishery science.

PNNL (www.pnl.gov) is a DOE Office of Science laboratory that solves complex problems in energy, national security, the environment and life sciences by advancing the understanding of physics, chemistry, biology and computation. PNNL employs 3,900, has a $640 million annual budget, and has been managed by Ohio-based Battelle since the lab’s inception in 1965.  (Posted 11/17/2004)

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Tom Ackerman and Paul Ellis Elected Fellows by American Association for the Advancement of Science

The full 2004 Class of Fellows was announced in the Oct. 31 issue of Science magazine. Tom Ackerman and Paul Ellis, both of PNNL’s Fundamental Science Directorate, were elected as members whose “efforts on behalf of the advancement of science or its applications are scientifically or socially distinguished.” AAAS began recognizing its distinguished members with the distinctive honor of Fellow in 1874.

Ackerman, a Battelle Fellow and chief scientist for DOE’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, is being recognized for pioneering studies of radiative properties of aerosols, for developing millimeter-wave radar for measuring cloud properties and for technical leadership of the nation’s principal atmospheric radiation research program.

Ellis, a Laboratory Fellow, is being honored for contributions to the field of multinuclear magneticPaul Ellis resonance spectroscopy and its applications to bioinorganic chemistry, short-range structure and bonding and chemical catalysis. Following a 23-year career as a member of the chemistry faculty at the University of South Carolina, he joined PNNL in 1993 to lead the development and commissioning of the magnetic resonance instrumentation laboratories at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). The EMSL’s magnetic resonance laboratory is recognized as being world-class in its capability and in the expertise of its staff.

Both Ackerman and Ellis will be recognized in February at the AAAS Fellows Forum to be held at the AAAS National Meeting in Seattle, Wash. Ackerman and Ellis join three other PNNL researchers as AAAS Fellows, including Senior Battelle Fellow Jean Futrell, Battelle Fellow David Dixon and Laboratory Fellow Norman Rosenberg.

Election to APS fellowship is limited to no more than one half of 1 percent of the society memebership, which currently stands at 43,000.  (Posted 10/31/2004)

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Don Bihl and Bruce Napier Named Fellows of Health Physics Society

The honorees were recognized in July at the HPS annual meeting in Washington, D.C., for their outstanding contributions to health physics.

Bihl operated the internal dosimetry program at DOE's Hanford Site in Washington State between 1989 and 2002. The program included performing internal radionuclide dose evaluations for thousands of staff on the Site. Bihl further managed the external dosimetry program for two other DOE sites. He presently consults for those two programs and works on the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health dose reconstruction project. He earned a bachelor’s degree in health physics in 1971 and a master’s degree in 1973, both from San Diego State University. Bihl has published more than 20 reports and publications.  (Posted 8/19/2004)

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Russell Jones Elected Fellow of NACE International, the National Association of Corrosion Engineers

Russell Jones, a Laboratory Fellow at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been elected Fellow of NACE International, the National Association of Corrosion Engineers. Each year the honor of Fellow is presented in recognition of distinguished contributions in the field of corrosion and its prevention.

Jones has more than 37 years of experience in the fields of stress corrosion cracking, high-temperature composites, fusion reactor materials, radiation effects on materials and mechanical properties of materials. He has more than 200 publications and has been the editor of 13 books and proceedings in his areas of expertise. Jones has been a member of NACE since 1966.

He earned a bachelor degree in metallurgical engineering from California State Polytechnic University in 1967 and a doctorate degree in materials science from the University of California in 1971. Additional honors for Jones include Fellow of ASM, International and Fellow for the Russian Academy of Engineering Sciences. He was also honored as the first Distinguished Alumni for Materials Engineering in 1994 by his alma mater, California State Polytechnic University. Jones serves as adjunct professor at Washington State University, instructing students on materials science and engineering.

Jones was recognized for this honor at the organization’s 59th annual Corrosion 2004 conference held in New Orleans, La. on Mar. 31. Additionally, he will now serve as an advisor to the technical and professional members of NACE International.

NACE International (www.nace.org) is a technical society with more than 15,000 members dedicated to public safety, environment protection and reducing the economic impact of corrosion. Jones is joined in the 2004 class of fellows by other well recognized corrosion experts including: John Beavers, Gerald Frankel, Robert Heidersbach, Peter Mayer, Derek Milliams, Michael Renner, Herbert Townsend and Leonardo Uller.  (Posted 4/14/2004)

Gary Smith and Denis Strachan Elected Fellows of American Ceramic Society

Gary Smith, portrait
Denis Strachan, portrait

Gary L. Smith and Denis Strachan, two researchers from the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, have been elected Fellows of the American Ceramic Society (ACerS). Gary L. Smith and Denis Strachan were elected by the ACerS board of directors to receive the honor, one of the society’s most distinguished. They join eight other PNNL staff members who have been recognized as ACerS Fellows.

Smith, a staff scientist, has served on more than 25 committees and technical sessions for the society, most recently as chair of the Nuclear and Environmental Technology Division. He has published more than 50 refereed journal articles, technical reports and conference papers, and has co-edited three ACerS publication volumes. Smith joined PNNL in 1993, and is currently on special assignment to the multi-billion dollar Waste Treatment Plant Project at the Hanford Site near Richland. He has been a member of ACerS since 1985. He earned a bachelor of science degree in chemistry from Occidental College in Los Angeles, and a doctorate in materials science and engineering from the University of Arizona.

Strachan, a laboratory fellow at PNNL, has been a technical chairman for four international conferences related to testing of ceramic and glass waste forms for the disposal of nuclear waste, and is a twice-invited guest scientist at the Hahn-Meitner Institute of Berlin. He has authored or co-authored more than 130 journal articles and technical reports, and holds a patent for a method for immobilizing radioactive iodine. Strachan has been with PNNL for 22 years, and has been a member of ACerS since 1975. He earned a bachelor of science degree in chemistry from Gonzaga University in Spokane, and a doctorate in physical chemistry from Iowa State University.

Both Smith and Strachan will be recognized Apr. 20 at the Honors and Awards Banquet at the ACerS Annual Meeting in Indianapolis, Ind.

ACerS (www.ceramics.org) is an international organization dedicated to the advancement of ceramics. The study of ceramics is used in a variety of industrial and scientific applications, including construction, space exploration and nuclear waste management.  (Posted 4/14/2004)

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Jean Futrell, Battelle Fellow, Elected Fellow of American Physical Society

Futrell’s election recognizes his work in furthering the development and fundamental aspects of mass spectrometry throughout his career, and how those contributions have led to dramatic advances in scientific research, including efficiencies in the field of expiremental chemical physics.

Futrell is credited with inventing the furst tandem double focusing mass spectrometer, which led to the achievement of kinetic energy analysis for both the rectant and product ion beams, and ion lenses for decelerating ion beams to near-thermal energy that became the world standard for studies of elementary processes in ion collisions.

Election to APS fellowship is limited to no more than one half of 1 percent of the society memebership, which currently stands at 43,000.  (Posted 2/9/2004)

 

2004 Elected Positions and Offices

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Gary L. Smith Appointed Chair of ASTM International Committee C26 on Nuclear Fuel Cycle

Gary L. Smith, a staff scientist at the Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been appointed chair of the ASTM International Committee C26 on Nuclear Fuel Cycle. This prominent and influential committee develops standards important to work done on the nuclear fuel cycle, including spent nuclear fuel, waste materials and repository waste packaging and storage. Smith also was honored with the Harlan J. Anderson Award which is presented annually to a member of C26 who has made outstanding contributions toward the successful operation of the Committee. Smith has more than 23 years of experience in the fields of ceramics and material science and engineering. For the last 10 years he has been working primarily in nuclear waste and vitrification. He has over 50 publications and has co-edited three Ceramic Transactions volumes, published by the American Ceramic Society. Smith is currently assigned to the Hanford Waste Treatment Plant near Richland to ensure the development and use of simulants is coordinated, consistent and defensible across the Project and into commissioning. He earned a bachelor degree in chemistry from Occidental College in Los Angeles, Calif. in 1980 and a doctorate in material science and engineering from the University of Arizona in 1993. Smith is a Fellow of ASTM International and of the American Ceramic Society, and is also a member of the Materials Research Society.

ASTM International (www.astm.org) is one of the largest standards development and delivery organizations in the world. Their standards are recognized and used in research and development, product testing, quality systems and commercial transactions.  (Posted 5/13/2004)

 

2003 Awards

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Dean Matson Receives American Chemical Society Regional Industrial Innovation Award

Dean Matson has been chosen to receive an American Chemical Society (ACS) Regional Industrial Innovation Award for his work in the development of Ultra Barrier Coatings. Matson is a Senior Research Scientist in PNNL’s Energy Science and Technology Directorate (ESTD) and has been with the Lab since 1985. He has 15 years of experience related to various aspects of vapor-deposited coating technology, and has received multiple awards and patents related to commercial application of his work in this and other areas. He received his BS in Chemistry and BA in Education from Western Washington State College in 1976, and PhD in Physical Chemistry from the University of Hawaii in 1984.

The ACS Regional Industrial Innovation Award Program (www.chemistry.org/industry/regionalawards) allows ACS to recognize scientific researchers for their creative contributions to society and their corporate leadership for its advancement of a healthy regional economy. Only fourteen nominees from six companies around the country were selected to receive this award. Dr. Matson will be recognized for this honor at the ACS 58th Northwest Regional Meeting in Bozeman, Montana in June of 2003.  (Posted 4/22/2003)

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Landis Kannberg Named Columbia Basin Section ASME Engineer of the Year

Landis Kannberg, Program Manager, Energy Science & Technology Directorate, has been named a Fellow in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers International and is the Columbia Basin Section ASME Engineer of the Year. Dr. Kannberg is known for his work in critical infrastructure protection and advanced energy concepts. For several years before the September 11 terrorist attacks, he was instrumental in establishing a Department of Energy program to help the nation’s industry better understand and manage their threats, vulnerabilities, and risks.  (Posted 2/1/2003)

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Richard Smith Receives American Chemical Society National Award for Creative Work in Analytical Chemistry

Richard Smith, Battelle Fellow and Chief Scientist at EMSL, received the American Chemical Society’s 2003 national award for creative work in Analytical Chemistry. Dr. Smith’s accomplishments include developments that involve the integration of work in two analytical disciplines: separation science and mass spectrometry. His leading role in the applications of these combined techniques to modern bioanalytical problems and biological systems characterization has led to numerous advances in analytical chemistry, and most recently in major new capabilities for large-scale protein studies. Dr. Smith’s research has included the development of capillary electrophoresis in combination with mass spectrometry. Dr. Smith also was honored as a highly cited author in chemistry by the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI). ISI provides the research community with products and services that enable them to gain access to historical research and keep abreast of the most recent developments in their respective disciplines.  (Posted 1/1/2003)

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David Dixon Receives American Chemical Society 2003 National Award

David Dixon, Associate Director of Theory, Modeling and Simulation at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), received the American Chemical Society’s 2003 national award for creative work in Fluorine Chemistry. The award honors Dr. Dixon for “advancing the use of computational chemistry to bring unique understanding to the field of fluorine chemistry, especially chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) replacements, organofluorine molecules, and inorganic fluorides.” Dr. Dixon introduced the use of reliable computational approaches to study compounds containing fluorine almost 20 years ago. At the time, it was thought that computational approaches could not predict the properties of fluorinated compounds, and he developed methods that allowed the properties of these technologically important compounds to be predicted reliably. He also has been a leader in the supercomputing revolution, demonstrating the capabilities of these unique resources to address the most challenging scientific and engineering problems.  (Posted 1/1/2003)

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Sotiris S. Xantheas Awarded Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award

Sotiris S. Xantheas, a chief scientist in PNNL's Fundamental Science Directorate (FSD), has been awarded the Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel Research Award from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation in Bonn, Germany. Between 2001 and 2003, the foundation will grant approximately 10 of these awards to outstanding young scientists already internationally recognized in their fields for significant contributions. Through this award, Xantheas was invited to spend time in a German research institution for at least six months to conduct research of his choice. He will spend his tenure in the Institute of Physical & Theoretical Chemistry at the University of Kaiserslautern and the Technical University of Munich.

Xantheas has been with PNNL since 1992. He is a physical chemist and received a diploma in chemical engineering from the Technical University of Athens, in Greece, and a doctorate from Iowa State University. His research interests lie in the application of high-level electronic structure calculations to elucidate the properties of hydrogen-bonded systems and the use of quantum mechanical results in the development of empirical models to simulate their macroscopic properties.

The Alexander von Humboldt Foundation is a nonprofit organization that promotes international research cooperation. More information is available online at http://www.avh.de/en/programme/preise/bessel.htm.  (Posted 5/22/2003)

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Richard Johanson Earns Two Safety Certifications

The exam was administered by the American College of Microbiology and endorsed by the American Biologist Safety Association (ABSA). This accomplishment gives Johanson two certifications, first, a certified specialist microbiologist (SM) in biological safety that merits a membership in the National Registry of Microbiologists and, second, a certified biological safety professional that is issued by the ABSA. Johanson is the fourth person in the state of Washington to be certified and one of 105 certified in the United States. The exam is administered once a year by the American College of Microbiology. Certified recipients are internationally recognized as having sufficient knowledge and experience to qualify as a specialist microbiologist in biological safety.

Johanson has 25 years of experience in the fields of public health and safety and risk management. His specific areas of expertise include chemical and biological safety. His motivation for taking the exam was his continued interest in the field of microbiology and PNNL’s move toward biological sciences and proteomics.  (Posted 3/17/2003)

 

2003 Fellowships

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Greg Exarhos Named Fellow of American Vacuum Society

The American Vacuum Society has named Greg Exarhos as Fellow of the Society. Exarhos, a laboratory fellow at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, is being recognized for his ""fundamental studies of charge transport phenomena in dielectric films and the use of spectroscopic methods to relate resident structure and chemistry to film properties."" He has been active in the AVS (www.avs.org) for many years including chair of the long range planning committee and election to the Board of Directors. He was appointed technical program chair for the 1997 International AVS meeting in San Jose and also has served for many years on the Executive Board of the Advanced Surface Engineering Division within the Society. Along with 10 other distinguished colleagues, Exarhos will be honored at the 50th International Meeting of the AVS in Baltimore, Md., in November 2003.

At PNNL, Exarhos coordinates the suite of fundamental materials research programs supported through the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences and manages three of the associated projects. His work is focused on laser-solid interactions, optical materials design and development and directed synthesis of nanoarchitectured materials. He also coordinates the multilaboratory polymer smart materials task area within the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials. He has served as principal investigator on 20 major research programs while at PNNL. From 1974 to 1980 he was a member of the chemistry faculty at Harvard University. Exarhos also was active in the development of radar-absorbing coatings for the Department of Defense. His research work appears in over 180 technical publications and books, and he has been awarded six patents.  (Posted 10/23/2003)

Darrell Fisher and Paul Stansbury Named Fellows by Health Physics Society

Darrell Fisher, portrait
Paul Stansbury, portrait

Darrell Fisher (left) and Paul Stansbury (right), senior scientists in the laboratory’s Environmental Technology Directorate have been named fellows by the Health Physics Society. They are being recognized for their “significant administrative, educational and scientific contributions to the profession of health physics.”

Darrell Fisher joined PNNL in 1978. He is a medical physicist with experience in nuclear science, environmental science, radiological protection, radiation biology and radiochemistry. He leads the laboratory’s Radioisotopes Program, a national technology resource supporting innovative radioisotope applications in science, medicine and industry. Additionally, he holds adjunct faculty appointments at the University of Washington and at Washington State University. He earned his bachelor’s degree in biology from the University of Utah in 1975, and his master’s degree and doctorate in nuclear engineering sciences from the University of Florida in 1976 and 1978, respectively.

Paul Stansbury joined PNNL in 1990 and specializes in the assessment and reduction of radiation risks in the workplace and environment, locally and around the world. He is certified by the American Board of Health Physics as a certified health physicist, and teaches a course on behalf of the Columbia Chapter of the Health Physics Society for those preparing for the certification exam. He has an adjunct appointment at Washington State University and instructs a course in radiologic science. He earned degrees from the Georgia Institute of Technology, including a bachelor’s degree in physics in 1970, a master’s degree in physics in 1971 and a doctorate in nuclear engineering in 1978.

Both Fisher and Stansbury will be recognized for this honor at an awards reception and dinner this July at the annual meeting of the society in San Diego, CA.

The Health Physics Society (www.hps.org) is an international professional scientific organization dedicated to promoting the practice of radiation safety. The society is active in all aspects of radiation protection, including information dissemination, standards development, education, preparation of position papers and promotion of scientific conferences and committees.  (Posted 6/10/2003)

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Darby Stapp Appointed Fellow by Society for Applied Anthropology

Darby Stapp, senior scientist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, was recently appointed a Fellow by the Society for Applied Anthropology. This award recognizes the contributions Stapp has made to apply social sciences to contemporary problems. Stapp has more than 25 years of experience in anthropology and archaeology and has worked at Hanford since 1988. He currently supports the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Cultural and Historic Resources Program, which helps ensure the protection of historic and archaeological sites and Native American traditional-use areas.  (Posted 4/1/2003)

Prabhakar

Prabhakar Singh Named Fellow of American Ceramic Society

Prabhakar Singh has been named a Fellow of the American Ceramic Society (ACerS). Dr. Singh is Fuel Cell Development Director (ESTD) and has been with the Lab since 2000. He has over 20 years of experience with advanced fuel cell technologies and holds a Ph.D. in Metallurgy from the University of Sheffield, UK. Elevation to the status of Fellow is one of the highest honors for ACerS members. The ACerS (www.ceramics.org) is a leading international organization dedicated to the understanding and advancement of ceramics in a variety of industrial and scientific applications. Dr. Singh will be recognized for this honor at a black-tie awards event at the ACerS National Meeting in April of 2003 in Nashville, Tennessee.  (Posted 3/12/2003)

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Society of Vacuum Coaters Elects Pete Martin as Mentor

The Society of Vacuum Coaters, SVC, has elected Pete Martin, a senior staff scientist and Laboratory Fellow,as a Mentor, or Fellow, of the Society of Vacuum Coaters (www.svc.org). The honor reflects more than 25 years of dedicated service to the coatings industry, including authoring and co-authoring more than 150 technical publications. Martin serves on the SVC's Board of Directors, is the technical editor and senior technologist for Vacuum Technology and Coating, and has served as the program chair for the Annual Technical Conference of the Society since 2001. He will be recognized in May at the 2003 Technical Conference in San Francisco. Martin is internationally recognized for his thin-film coatings research. He earned a doctorate in solid state physics from Ohio State University, and joined PNNL in 1978.  (Posted 3/1/2003)

Deborah Dickman Elected Fellow of Institute of Nuclear Materials Management

Deborah Dickman, portrait

Deborah Dickman, Product Line Manager, Non-Proliferation and ARMS Control, National Security Directorate, was elected a Fellow of the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management. The Institute recognized Ms. Dickman for her distinguished contributions to safeguards and non-proliferation programs both domestically and world-wide.

 (Posted 2/1/2003)

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David Geist Appointed Fellow in American Institute of Fishery Research Biologists

David Geist, Senior Research Scientist II, Environmental Technology Directorate, was appointed a Fellow in the American Institute of Fishery Research Biologists, which advances the theory, practice, and application of fishery and related sciences. Dr. Geist’s accomplishments include the development of radio telemetry techniques to monitor fish behavior and physiology, and innovative studies of ground water – surface water interactions in salmon spawning habitat.  (Posted 2/1/2003)

Bruce Kay and Charles Peden Elected Fellows of American Vacuum Society

Kay, portriat
Peden, portrait

Bruce Kay (left) and Charles Peden (right) were elected Fellows of the American Vacuum Society. This recognition goes to members who made sustained and outstanding scientific and technical contributions for at least 10 years. Dr. Peden is Associate EMSL Director for Interfacial Chemistry and Engineering, and Dr. Kay is Senior Chief Scientist, Chemical Structure & Dynamics. They were honored at the 47th National AVS Symposium in Boston.

 (Posted 2/1/2003)

 

2003 Elected Positions and Offices

abrefah

John Abrefah Appointed to Two National Committees

PNNL’s John Abrefah has been appointed by the American Nuclear Society President to serve on two national committees; the Honors and Awards Committee, and the Meeting, Proceedings & Transactions Committee.

The Honors and Awards Committee is responsible for administering a program that advances candidates for the Fellow grade, encourage and assist individuals and groups that sponsor candidates, and supervise the preparation of diplomats for presentation. The work scope of the Meeting, Proceedings & Transactions includes a provision to ensure that technical meetings held by the Society and its divisions and local sections meet the society standards for technical and scientific contributions.

The American Nuclear Society (www.ans.org) is an international, not-for-profit scientific and educational organization consisting of approximately 11,000 engineers, scientists, educators, students, and others with nuclear-related interests.  (Posted 9/23/2003)

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Steve Wiley Chosen to Participate in National Academies' Inaugural Keck Futures Initiative Conference

Steve Wiley, chief scientist of the Biomolecular Systems Initiative from the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, participated in the National Academies’ inaugural Keck Futures Initiative conference Nov. 14-16 in Irvine, Calif. Only 100 participants were selected to attend this conference, with Wiley representing one of only four scientists selected from a national laboratory.

“Futures Conferences…bring together some of the nation’s best and brightest researchers,” according to Ken Fulton, executive director, National Academy of Sciences. The Futures Initiative is a 15-year effort by the National Academies and the W.M. Keck Foundation to catalyze interdisciplinary inquiry and to enhance communications among researchers, funding agencies, universities and the general public.

“This was a great opportunity to discuss issues surrounding cell signaling as it applies to a variety of scientific disciplines and the challenges of doing interdisciplinary biology,” said Wiley. “Forums like these are invaluable in highlighting both the importance of the work, as well as the unique capabilities we have at PNNL.”

Wiley has authored more than 150 scientific publications, including more than 80 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals and 15 review articles and book chapters. His work is notable for combining the techniques of molecular and cellular biology with quantitative biochemical and optical assays. The results are then used to build computer models of the underlying cell processes.

Wiley holds a B.A. in Biology from the University of Tennessee, and a Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences from the University of Tennessee-Oak Ridge Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences.

More information on the Futures Initiatives is available at www.nationalacademies.org/keck  (Posted 12/2/2003)

bruckner

Cynthia Bruckner-Lea Selected to Participate in National Academy of Engineering Ninth Annual Frontiers of Engineering Symposium

Cynthia Bruckner-Lea, a senior scientist at PNNL, has been selected to participate in the National Academy of Engineering’s ninth annual Frontiers of Engineering symposium. The three-day symposium, held September 18-20, 2003, highlights 83 of the nation's top young engineers who are “performing leading-edge engineering research and technical work”. The participants were selected from nominations by leading engineers and engineering organizations in industry, academia, and government. More information on the symposium is available at www.nae.edu/frontiers.

Bruckner-Lea joined PNNL in 1992 and heads research programs in bioanalytical sensor systems, including a biodetection project funded by the Department of Homeland Security, and efforts to develop a Biodetection Enabling Analyte Delivery System, or BEADS, technology for environmental monitoring. She has authored more than 20 scientific publications in peer reviewed journals, and holds three patents in the area of bioanalytical chemistry and microfluidics. Her scientific contributions have been recognized by invitations to present papers at symposia and seminars on sensor and biosensor techniques both nationally and internationally, and she is also active in professional societies in her field. Bruckner-Lea also was recently awarded the 2003 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Woman of Achievement Award.

The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964 and is an independent, nonprofit institution that serves as an adviser to government and the public on issues in engineering and technology. Academy members include the nation's most acclaimed engineers, and are elected by their peers for distinguished achievements in their fields.  (Posted 9/17/2003)

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Jonathan Young Selected as Member of Newly Formed National Research Council Committee

Jonathan Young, of the ETD Risk and Decisions Sciences Group, has been selected as a member of a newly formed National Research Council committee. Along with the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering, the National Research Council (www.nationalacademies.org/nrc) provides science, technology and health policy advice under a Congressional Charter. Jonathan was selected because of his expertise in probabilistic risk assessment technology and applications.  (Posted 4/3/2003)

yasuo

Yasuo Onishi Appointed to Committee on Understanding Oil Spill Dispersants: Efficacy and Effects

Yasuo Onishi, a scientist for the Fluid and Computational Engineering Group PNNL has been appointed to the National Academy of Sciences’ Committee on Understanding Oil Spill Dispersants: Efficacy and Effects. Dr. Onishi will assist the committee in evaluating the effects and efficacy of chemical dispersants, and evaluating risk assessments related to an oil spill in freshwater, estuarine and marine environments. Dr. Onishi’s principal experience lies in fluid mechanics/hydrology, environmental risk assessment and reactive fluid dynamics of radioactive and chemical wastes. His career also highlights such achievements as being a principal developer of four sediment-contaminant transport models; expertise in the risk assessment and transportation of chemicals and contaminants; and his work on the sediment-contaminant migration and fate is internationally recognized. Dr. Onishi also serves as a graduate adjunct faculty member in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department of Washington State University.  (Posted 3/9/2003)

Gary McNair and Landis Kannberg Inducted into Oregon State University Academy of Distinguished Engineers

Landis Kannberg, portrait
Gary McNair, portrait

Gary McNair (left), Energy Science and Technology Directorate, and Landis Kannberg (right), Environmental Technology Directorate, will be inducted into Oregon State University’s Academy of Distinguished Engineers on February 21. The Academy was established in 1998 and has inducted 62 engineers. This year an additional 13 engineers will be honored. Membership in the Academy is awarded to mid-career Oregon State graduates who have sustained distinguished contributions to the profession, field, OSU, or society at large. Members have at least 20 years of experience beyond their bachelor’s degrees and are still practicing their profession.

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Dr. Novella Bridges Named One of Eight "Young Observers"

The U.S. National Committee for IUPAC named Dr. Novella Bridges one of eight "Young Observers," who traveled to the 2003 IUPAC General Assembly and Congress in Ottawa, Canada, August 9-17, 2003 to attend and observe specific meetings of the General Assembly, the Divisions, and Standing Committees, to acquaint themselves with IUPAC activities and projects. Information about the IUPAC is available online at http://www.iupac.org/general/about.html. Dr. Bridges joined PNNL in January 2001, earning her Ph.D. in chemistry from Louisiana State University in 2000. She also was recognized as a Rising Star in Technology at the 2001 Women of Color Government and Defense Technology Awards Conference. Dr. Bridges is a research scientist in the Materials Science division of PNNL's Energy Science and Technology Directorate. She works in the Materials Synthesis and Modifications group with research experience in multi-step synthesis, high pressure autoclave experiments, tabulating theoretical calculations of Organometallic compounds, material sciences, nanotechnology, radioanalytical chemistry and separations, and bio-based products.

 

2002 Awards

ackerman

Thomas Ackerman Awarded NASA's Distinguished Public Service Medal

Thomas Ackerman, Battelle Fellow and Chief Scientist for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program, has been awarded the National Aeronautics & Space Administration’s Distinguished Public Service Medal. This is the highest honor NASA awards to anyone who was not a Government employee when the service was performed. The award is granted only to individuals whose distinguished accomplishments contributed substantially to the NASA — mission. Dr. Ackerman has been intimately involved with the NASA earth science activities for many years. In addition, he has served on several NASA review boards and panels over the past 15 years.

lesperance

Ann Lesperance Awarded Environmental Protection Agency's Bronze Medal

Ann Lesperance, Senior Research Scientist II, Environmental Technology Directorate, has been awarded the Environmental Protection Agencys Bronze Medal. Ms. Lesperance was presented this award by EPA for developing a Statement of Cooperation between EPA and Environment Canada on protecting and managing Puget Sound/Georgia Basin—an international ecosystem shared by both countries. She currently works with the EPA Region X Administrator and the Washington State Director of Ecology on Hanford Cleanup issues. She also advises and mentors business students engaged in international business studies at the University of Washington.

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Steven Doctor Recognized by International Society of Optical Engineering and the NDE Organizing Committee

Steven Doctor, Senior Chief Engineer, National Security Directorate, received the International Society for Optical Engineering and the NDE Organizing Committee 2002 NDE Lifetime Achievement Award for his commitment and outstanding leadership in research and development in the field of Nondestructive Evaluation.  (Posted 1/1/2002)

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Shawn Knowles Named 2002 Young Leader of The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society

Shawn Knowles, Senior Research Scientist, Energy Science & Technology Directorate, was named a 2002 Young Leader of The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS). This national award, instituted in 1996, is presented annually to about 10 highly qualified individuals under age 35 to recognize their professional accomplishments in the materials field and prepare them for leadership roles within TMS.  (Posted 1/1/2002)

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Allison Campbell Selected by American Chemical Society as One of the Most Promising Young Female Chemists in the Nation

Allison Campbell, Deputy Director of EMSL, has been selected by the American Chemical Society as one of the most promising young female chemists in the nation. An ACS presidential-appointed committee selected 12 women chemists from nominations across the country for their current and projected contributions to the field of chemistry. The chemists are being honored in conjunction with the 75th diamond jubilee celebration of the ACS Women Chemist Committee. Each chemist is being featured in Chemical and Engineering News in 2002.  (Posted 1/1/2002)

singhal_ipa

Subhash Singhal Receives Invited Professorship Award

Subhash Singhal, a Battelle fellow in the Energy Science & Technology Directorate, received the Invited Professorship Award from the Japan Ministry of Science, Education and Culture. As part of this award, he spent two weeks in Japan in November 2001, lecturing on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell related topics at Oita University, SOFC Society of Japan, and Mitsubishi Materials Corporation.  (Posted 1/1/2002)

 

2002 Fellowships

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David Dixon Named Fellow of American Physical Society

David Dixon has been named a fellow of the American Physical Society for 2002. The citation for this honor reads, “For the development and use of high-level computational chemistry techniques to solve complex industrial and environmental problems.”  (Posted 6/1/2002)

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Robert Schenter Elected Fellow in American Nuclear Society

Robert Schenter, Staff Scientist, Environmental Technology Directorate, was elected a Fellow in the American Nuclear Society. Dr. Schenter’s recognition was based on his long-time work on neutron cross-section and decay data, and on radioisotope production.  (Posted 1/1/2002)

 

2002 Elected Positions and Offices

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Walt Laity Elected Vice President, Engineering Education

Walt Laity, ESTD, has been elected Vice President, Engineering Education by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Laity is the Nuclear Safety & Technology Product Line Manager for ESTD. He received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Oregon State University in 1977. This honor is the result of Laity’s active and dedicated service in ASME for the past 15 years. As part of this service, he was appointed to represent ASME on the Engineering Accreditation Commission and, most recently, on the Board of Directors of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. Laity will lead the Board on Engineering Education, which is responsible for ASME’s role in promoting the quality and improvement of mechanical engineering and mechanical engineering technology education, and for managing ASME’s responsibilities as a participating society of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. Dr. Laity’s nomination was confirmed at the ASME International Congress and Exposition in November of 2002 and he will officially take office for a three-year term at the 2003 ASME Summer Annual Meeting. Additional information on ASME is available at www.amse.org.  (Posted 11/1/2002)

Glenn Hollenberg Appointed to Nominating Committee of American Ceramic Society

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Glenn Hollenberg, a senior staff scientist, was appointed to the Nominating Committee of The American Ceramic Society in April 2002. Committee members assure that a slate of candidates are willing and able to be elected as officers or board members of the Society. An active member since 1966, Hollenberg served on the Board of Directors and held numerous chairmanships for the Society's Nuclear and Environmental Technology Division, Basic Science Division and Ceramic Manufacturing Council. Hollenberg's career has included project management of work in sodium separation, key contributions on the Tritium Target Development Project and engineering for irradiation testing of solid breeder materials for fusion.  (Posted 8/1/2002)

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Walter J. Apley Elected to ANS Nationall Board of Directors

Walter J. Apley, Associate Laboratory Director for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Environmental Technology Directorate, was elected to a three-year term on the national board of directors of the American Nuclear Society. The Society represents 1,600 organizations, has 11,000 members, and helps develop and safely apply nuclear science and technology for public benefit. Apley is a life member of both the American Nuclear Society and American Society of Naval Engineers. At PNNL since 1977, Apley previously served as the Laboratory's Facilities & Operations Director and Deputy for Laboratory Operations. Before coming to PNNL, he was on active duty for five years as a naval nuclear submarine officer.  (Posted 8/1/2002)

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Tom Tenforde Elected President of National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements

Tom Tenforde was elected president of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. He is the fourth president since the Council and its predecessor organizations was formed in 1929. Dr. Tenforde, Senior Chief Scientist., Environmental Technology Directorate, has promoted the production of radioisotopes and isotope products for medical, industrial, and research purposes, and championed work in the environmental and biological sciences.  (Posted 5/1/2002)

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Judith Ann Bamberger Elected Vice Chair of Coordinating Group on Fluid Measurements

Judith Ann Bamberger, a senior research engineer at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, was elected Vice Chair of the Coordinating Group on Fluid Measurements, part of the prestigious, international American Society of Mechanical Engineer's Fluid Engineering Division. During her two-year term, she will work with international experts to organize, promote and present symposia discussing key research and issues in instrumentation, procedures, data acquisition and analysis for fluid measurements. At the end of the two-year term, it is customary for the vice chair to be elected as chair.  (Posted 2/1/2002)

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Evelyn Hirt Elected to Aerospace and Electronics Systems Society Board of Governors

Evelyn Hirt was elected to the Aerospace and Electronics Systems Society Board of Governors for 2002-2003. She is a Senior Quality Engineer in the Environment, Safety, Health & Quality Directorate.

Dan Strom and Bruce Napier Elected to Six-year Terms as Members of National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements

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Strom, portrait

Dan Strom ( left), Staff Engineer, and Bruce Napier (right), Staff Scientist, were elected to six-year terms as members of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Both work in PNNL’s Environmental Technology Directorate. Mr. Napier was elected because of his national and international experience in environmental radiation protection. For example, he has been a key contributor on the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction project, which estimated the possible doses to people living near Hanford from 1944 to 1992. Dr. Strom has extensive experience in radiation protection. His work includes dosimetry of intakes of radionuclides, applied statistical inference, occupational dose reconstruction, indoor radon assessment, and radiation risk assessment.

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Steven Parker President of National Association of Energy Engineers

Steven Parker, Senior Research Engineer II, Energy Science and Technology Directorate, is president of the National Association of Energy Engineers. Mr. Parker is PNNL lead for the DOE Federal Energy Management Program’s new technology demonstration program, which introduces new energy-efficient technologies to the federal sector. He received the AEE’s Energy Professional Development Award in 2001 and International Energy Project of the Year honors as part of a PNNL team the previous year. He also is Editor-in-Chief for the association’s Cogeneration and Competitive Power Journal.

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Joel Pounds Appointed to Canada Research Chairs' College of Reviewers

Joel Pounds, a scientist at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, has been appointed to the Canada Research Chairs' College of Reviewers. The College of Reviewers seeks out the expertise of specialists in areas that have been targeted for research in Canadian universities. Pounds' expertise in cellular and molecular toxicity of metals and osteotoxicology is of particular interest to the College.  (Posted 5/1/2002)

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SK Sundaram Appointed "Visiting Scholar" at Harvard University

SK Sundaram, chief scientist in Advanced Processing and Applications at PNNL, has been appointed "Visiting Scholar" by the Division of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Harvard University. He will work with Prof. Eric Mazur on ultra fast lattice dynamics and nonlinear optical properties of materials.  (Posted 5/1/2002)

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Richard Benedick Elected to American Academy of Diplomacy

Richard Benedick, Associate Director of the Joint Global Change Research Institute, was elected to the American Academy of Diplomacy. The academy is an association of 100 former cabinet secretaries, ambassadors, and statesmen who have made significant contributions to American foreign policy. Ambassador Benedick is the only academy member to have been elected for his work in the environment and science fields, rather than in traditional foreign policy.  (Posted 1/1/2002)

 

2001 Awards

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Jeffery Dagle Named Tri-Cities Engineer of the Year for 2001

Jeffery Dagle, Chief Engineer, Energy Science & Technology Directorate, was named Tri-Cities Engineer of the Year for 2001 by the Tri-Cities Chapter, National Society of Professional Engineers. The awardees are judged based on their technical, professional, and community contributions. Mr. Dagle was recognized for his world-class power grid analysis expertise, his efforts with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, especially the Power Engineering Society, and support to the local community.  (Posted 1/1/2001)

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Single-molecule Spectroscopy Among 101 Most Important Scientific Discoveries

DOE’s Office of Science in June 2001 named single-molecule spectroscopy among the 101 most important scientific discoveries supported by the Office during the past 25 years. Real-time observation of individual enzyme molecules by Peter Lu of PNNL and Sunney Xie, Harvard University, established single-molecule spectroscopy as one of the most important new methods for unraveling chemical dynamics in heterogeneous and complex chemical systems. In addition to their pioneering work on biological systems, Dr. Xie and Dr. Lu have developed and applied single-molecule spectroscopic methods for studying chemical dynamics in interfacial chemical systems, semiconductor nanoparticles, and nanostructures.  (Posted 6/1/2001)

 

2001 Discover Magazine Awards

Christopher Columbus Fellowship Foundation Award Winner-Timed Neutron Detector-Richard Craig

Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation were presented by the Christopher Columbus Foundation "to recognize the all-too-often neglected men and women behind the technologies that impact our lives."

See PNNL's news release for more information on PNNL's winners.

The Timed Neutron Detector (TND) was honored by Discover Magazine with the 2001 Christopher Columbus Fellowship Foundation Award. This award is given to a living American currently working on a discovery that will significantly affect society and that needs additional funds to be realized. The TND, developed by Dick Craig and Tony Peurrung, looks similar to a metal detector, yet it applies neutron physics to find indications of a land mine's presence. The system detects hydrogen, which is present in casings and explosives found in plastic or metal land mines, and hydrogen's interactions with neutrons. Thus land mines can be accurately and safely located for disarming.

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Health Category - Combined Optical/Magnetic Resonance Microscope-Robert Wind

This innovation combines the principles of magnetic resonance imaging and confocal microscopy to create a new microscope to study cells. With this new instrument, live cells can, for the first time, be examined simultaneously with two entirely different microscopic techniques. In this way, the information provided by both microscopes can be combined and integrated. This makes it possible to follow cellular events in real time, and in more detail than is possible with each of the microscopes individually.

Findings based on this new technology are likely to have a significant impact on basic cellular research and increase our knowledge of how cells work and respond to stresses, such as exposure to contamination. The technology and its resulting research also may become of great value in medical laboratories and hospitals in improving the detection and diagnosis of diseased cells and in evaluating a patient's response to therapy.

"We're excited about where this technology is taking us because it may allow us to study a variety of cell processes in more detail than ever before, including those of critical importance to such things as cancer diagnosis and therapy," said Robert Wind, who led the multidisciplinary development team.

 

1999 Discover Magazine Awards

Winner - Transportation Category - Micro-Plasmatron Fuel Converter

Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation were presented by the Christopher Columbus Foundation "to recognize the all-too-often neglected men and women behind the technologies that impact our lives."

Daniel Cohn of MIT and colleagues, including Jud Virden at PNNL, shared the winning award for developing the world's smallest oil refinery. The plasmatron looks a little like a fat spark plug, and it can use anything that burns as fuel to produce electricity that turns the fuel and surrounding air into plasma, a hot collection of charged atoms and electrons. The end product is a hydrogen-rich gas that burns far more cleanly than gasoline.

Finalist - Environment Category - Mesoporous Silica for Mercury Removal-Xiangdong Feng

While a researcher at PNNL, Feng developed a process where molecules that can grab mercury out of the water are placed inside mesoporous silica. This spongelike rock has a surface area thousands of times larger than its size allowing it to grab the mercury quickly and efficiently. Eventually, Feng says, it should be possible to reduce the presence of mercury to a few parts per trillion, compared with a few parts per billion for current techniques, and do it more quickly as well. In addition, Feng says his invention can remove just about any pollutant or heavy metal from contaminated water. "People say I should quit my day job and start mining for gold."

Mesoporous Silica also won an R&D 100 award in 1998.

 

1997 Discover Magazine Awards

Winner - Computer Hardware and Electronics Category - MUSTPAC-1 (Medical Ultrasound, Three-dimensional and Portable with Advanced Communications - Rik Littlefield

Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation were presented by the Christopher Columbus Foundation "to recognize the all-too-often neglected men and women behind the technologies that impact our lives."

MUSTPAC-1 allows a field medic or physician to perform three-dimensional scans of an ill or injured soldier. Experts anywhere in the world can then interpret the scans.

Developed for the military, the portable unit weighs about 85 pounds, fits in a backpack, and can be configured to run on batteries. MUSTPAC-1 will bring the benefits of sophisticated ultrasound imaging used in major hospitals to the front lines. Army officials hope this device may someday reduce the number of battlefield deaths. For the less severely injured, the technology promises to provide previously unavailable medical diagnosis and treatment with improved quality of care.

In addition to military applications, MUSTPAC-1 could be used by rural physicians in treating medical emergencies and providing assistance in hard-to-access places such as mountains, boats, and even outer space.

 

1996 Discover Magazine Awards

Finalist - Environmental Category - RubberCycle: Tire-Recycling Microbes-Robert Romine

Discover Magazine Awards for Technological Innovation were presented by the Christopher Columbus Foundation "to recognize the all-too-often neglected men and women behind the technologies that impact our lives."

PNNL chemist Bob Romine was working on a way of using recycled tire rubber in asphalt pavement when his wife, Margaret, a PNNL microbiologist, introduced him to Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. As the name implies, the bug likes to dine on sulfur found among the minerals in the hot springs. When added to a vat of powdered tire rubber, the microbe attacks the sulfur in the rubber. That turns out to be the best way of decomposing this chemically tough material that is hard to recycle. Although virgin rubber is like "a plate of wet noodles," as Romine says, when heated the sulfur atoms combine with carbon to form a stiff lattice. Sulfolobus breaks the lattice down. Automobile tires generally cannot contain any more than 3 percent of recycled rubber because of high performance requirements: inert impurities would cause too much heat to build up when the rubber meets the road, making the tires wear out quickly. For this reason, Romine makes sure to curb his bacteria, either by lowering the temperature or raising the pH, before they break down all the sulfur-carbon bonds. That way the rubber can be made to bond more thoroughly with virgin rubber during recycling. Because these bonds dissipate heat, tires can contain up to 15 percent of the recycled rubber without sacrificing quality.

RubberCycle also won and R&D award in 1997.

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